News

Worcestershire NHS Trust
Worcestershire NHS Trust
Published 8th Aug 2017

Worcestershire NHS Trust was put in to special measures in December 2015. This means it has had over a year and a half to put things to a normal standard (not exceptional which you would expect) for a service that is supposed to care for and look after the most vulnerable in society.

Unannounced visits to Kidderminster Hospital, the Alexandra Hospital and Redditch Hospital in April 2017 by the Care Quality Commission produced yet another damning report on the state of the Worcestershire NHS trust.

When patients are being treated in corridors it is no wonder mistakes are happening and medical negligence occurs in Redditch, Kidderminster and Worcester Hospitals. People should feel safe coming to the local hospitals in Worcestershire not be worrying about being treated by an NHS trust in special measures for over a year and a half. 

The inspectors have been inspecting Worcestershire NHS trust over the past 2 years yet still they fail to fulfil the basic requirements. 

Nicola Cummings Medical Negligence Solicitor based in Worcestershire stated "It is very sad when the local NHS trust is in such a bad state and after 18 months of being placed in special measures they have still not sorted out the problems to a basic acceptable level. My firm has dealt with what are called never events where people have died due to the incompetence at these hospitals including a patient being linked to the wrong machine because the ward was so messy. Patients are being placed in the wrong wards for their problems, patients are not being monitored properly again leading in some cases to death which my firm has had to deal with. When peoples lives are being dealt with there should be more serious sanctions than just another inspection saying the same thing."

Mistakes happen in hospitals however when mistakes happen over and over again because of issues within the structure of the Worcestershire NHS trust more and more people will have to live or in some cases die due to the medical negligence within the Worcestershire NHS trust system when instead the trust should be learning from their mistakes. 

Disgraced Breast Surgeon
Disgraced Breast Surgeon
Published 7th Aug 2017

A breast surgeon who destroyed his patients lives has had his 15-year jail term increased to 20 years. 

Nicola Cummings one of the specialist clinical negligence solicitors who is acting against Mr Ian Patterson to obtain justice for his victims has stated "this is a situation driven by pure greed, that a man in a position of trust can destroy patients lives who looked to him as saving their lives this is a massive betrayal".

The spire hospital and the NHS have allowed this man to perform unnecessary and negligent surgery without regard for their patients these negligent operations have caused misery to many innocent patients of Mr Ian Patterson. 

Nicola Cummings as a specialist clinical negligent solicitor (also referred to as medical negligence) is one of the few solicitors to be involved in the group action against Mr Patterson and believes more should be done to hold private hospitals to account. "Whilst the NHS has worked hard to correct the wrongs carried out by Mr Patterson for his negligence and deliberate acts, the private system has let their patients down".

Nicola Cummings is one of a specialist group of clinical negligent solicitors that is not only able to deal with the specialist clinical negligence litigation as documented above, Nicola is also a national panel clinical negligence solicitor for a legal expense insurance company such is her specialism.

Please contact Nicola today to discuss your needs Nicola deals with all aspects of medical negligence from gynaecological issues, to cancer misdiagnosis, to surgical errors and orthopaedic issues.   

Ambulance service apologises after death of woman who was told to take paracetamol for chest pains
Ambulance service apologises after death of woman who was told to take paracetamol for chest pains
Published 16th Nov 2016

A woman died from a heart condition just two days after a paramedic told her to take paracetamol for her chest pains.

Carol Wilson had been suffering from chest pains for a few days, as well as severe throat and ear pain, when her husband Peter called 111 on New Year’s Day in 2015.

A paramedic was sent to the couple’s Sheffield home at around 7am but, instead of giving her a heart scan or taking her to hospital, they told her to take paracetamol.

Mrs Wilson, 70, died in her sleep two days later because of a heart condition.

Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust has apologised for the death of Mrs Wilson, who had three sons, and admitted that it could have been prevented.

Mr Wilson, a 72-year-old retired HR director, said: “We had been married for over 40 years and I don’t think I will ever truly get over Carol’s death and I’m still devastated thinking about it now.

“Nothing can turn back the clock but I just hope that the trust will learn the importance of investigating chest pain in the future.”

Peter Wilson said he was "devastated" by Carol's death.

A spokesman for Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust said: “We would like to apologise for the standard of care that was provided to Mrs Wilson on January 1 2015.

"The assessment carried out by a member of our staff was not reflective of the high quality clinical care provided by the Trust and actions have been taken as a result of this incident to prevent such an occurrence in the future.

"We would like to reassure members of the public that we take very seriously any concerns that are raised by patients and their relatives and we are committed to being open and honest with them."

Source: telegraph

Sussex family to take legal action over premature baby’s death
Sussex family to take legal action over premature baby’s death
Published 16th Nov 2016
Isabellina Brewerton died on October 31, 2013, at just 33 days old.
 
Mother Jay Brewerton, from Haslam Crescent, Bexhill, gave birth to Isabellina 13 weeks early.
 
Weighing just 2lb 2oz, she was transferred from East Surrey Hospital to the neonatal unit at St
George’s Hospital in South London.
 
Isabellina’s condition deteriorated and medical staff tried to save her.
 
The doctor trying to resuscitate Isabellina broke off to answer his phone, leaving the baby in the
care of a nurse.
 
She died soon afterwards, having suffered multiple organ failure.
 
A hospital investigation concluded that the doctor taking a call ‘had no bearing on the outcome’.
 
But Jay, who was able to touch her precious daughter just seven times in those 33 days, says she
feels there are still question marks surrounding Isabellina’s death.
 
She said: “There was a catalogue of errors which occurred causing the consultant to be called into
the hospital in the middle of the night to assist the junior doctor in charge.”
 
“There is no guarantee that we will get the truth, or an apology - that’s not occurred in three years I
have little hope it will now - but at least we will establish the actual facts.”
 
Last week St George’s Hospital was placed in Special Measures after being rated ‘inadequate’ by the
CQC.
 
Source: Chichester

Church Crookham care home 'must learn from errors' after grandmother's choking death
Church Crookham care home 'must learn from errors' after grandmother's choking death
Published 16th Nov 2016

The daughter of an elderly woman who choked to death at a Church Crookham care home is calling for bosses to learn from their mistakes after its owners pleaded guilty to health and safety breaches.

Margaret Humphreys, 84, died after choking on food at Marlborough House Nursing Home in Aldershot Road on August 16, 2014.

At a hearing at Winchester Crown Court on Monday (November 7), Marlborough House pleaded guilty and was ordered to pay an £80,000 fine over two years following a successful prosecution by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) for a breach of Section 3, Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Mrs Humphreys, a grandmother, became a temporary respite resident at Marlborough House while her family went on holiday.

Her daughter usually cared for her mother at home, since she had suffered a stroke.

The stroke left Mrs Humphreys unable to swallow large pieces of food, meaning she needed to be supervised while eating and her food had to be cut up into small pieces.

Following Mrs Humphreys’ death and other issues raised at the home, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) took enforcement action and issued a number of warning notices following an unannounced inspection in September the same year.

The HSE launched an investigation into safety standards at the home and found Marlborough House had failed to comply with its responsibilities under the Health & Safety at Work Act 1974..

After the case, Mrs Humphreys daughter, Gayle Gunner, said: “It is a really difficult decision to leave a relative in respite care, but it’s done in the hope that they will get the best quality of care, when the family is in need of respite.

“It is therefore crushing to learn how mum died and we feel that the care home betrayed our trust.

“My family and I are relieved by the hearing’s outcome and hope that through this prosecution, valuable lessons have been learned by Marlborough House to ensure no-one else loses their loved ones in the same devastating way we did.

 “We now hope to move forward with concluding mum’s inquest so we can get back to thinking of her in happier times and not the dreadful circumstances of her death.”

Source: gethampshire


Mother speaks out after medical negligence left her daughter with cerebral palsy
Mother speaks out after medical negligence left her daughter with cerebral palsy
Published 14th Nov 2016

A mother has spoken out about her fight for compensation after medical negligence left her daughter with cerebral palsy.

Leona Bisping was born in September 2001 but a court has ruled that a delay in delivery and a failure to proceed to a caesarean section caused her to suffer brain damage and she now requires constant care.

Now her mother has taken part in a new campaign to raise awareness of the effects of a brain injury as a result of medical negligence called #LeonasStory and appeared in a video.

Angela Boreham, from Clitheroe, said: “The morning after I’d been induced it became evident quite quickly that Leona was in distress and her heart rate had dipped.

“The midwives called the obstetricians and decided that I didn’t need a caesarean and they would wait and see what happened.

“Eventually they took me up to the delivery suite and said that if it happened once more they would send me for a caesarean. It did happen again and we went for a caesarean.

 “The paediatricians arrived then they had to resuscitate her.

“For a day or two she was actually having seizures constantly.

“They got her seizures under control but she was a very agitated baby.

“She basically never stopped crying until eventually they got her medication right and then she calmed down.

Cerebral palsy is a neurological disorder which is caused by damage to the brain during, before or after a child is born.

It affects muscle movement and also co-ordination, sometimes resulting in a variety of symptoms such as muscle weakness, stiffness, tremors and problems with balance.

The campaign aims to highlight the impact of a brain injury and how making a claim can help to improve not only quality of life, but also provide a wider support network for those affected.

Mrs Boreham was able to use the compensation to specially adapt her house and garden in order to make Leona feel as comfortable as possible, as well as paying for high-quality medical equipment and various physiotherapy sessions.

Source: lancashiretelegraph

Disabled man awarded £2.5million compensation from NHS after hospital birth fault
Disabled man awarded £2.5million compensation from NHS after hospital birth fault
Published 14th Nov 2016

A man has been awarded a £2.5million NHS payout 47 years after suffering catastrophic brain damage at birth.

Peter Atherton was left with severe physical and learning difficulties after being starved of oxygen at Billinge Hospital, Wigan.

Peter Atherton has been awarded a £2.5million NHS payout 47 years after suffering catastrophic brain damage at birth.

Asherton also has cerebral palsy affecting all four of his limbs, memory problems and struggles with communication.

Parents Maurice and Sheila, now in their 70s, have cared for him with little professional help, and no compensation for the errors made at his birth.

A financial settlement has now been approved by the High Court, with the NHS agreeing to the payout without accepting liability.

Speaking outside the court after the verdict, Peter’s mother said: “Peter will be able to have a more comfortable life now.”

Upon winning the compensation Peter’s mother said: “Peter will be able to have a more comfortable life now.

Upon Approving the settlement, Judge Graham Wood QC said: “Where parents have dedicated themselves in the way these parents have, it is only right the court notes and commends their dedication. One hopes now, with the benefit of these funds, that professional care can be provided.

“This gives them some assurance that, should anything happen to them in future, Peter will be very well cared for.”

Source: thesun

-language:EN-US'>It affects muscle movement and also co-ordination, sometimes resulting in a variety of symptoms such as muscle weakness, stiffness, tremors and problems with balance.

 

The campaign aims to highlight the impact of a brain injury and how making a claim can help to improve not only quality of life, but also provide a wider support network for those affected.

Mrs Boreham was able to use the compensation to specially adapt her house and garden in order to make Leona feel as comfortable as possible, as well as paying for high-quality medical equipment and various physiotherapy sessions.

Source: lancashiretelegraph

Disabled man awarded £2.5million compensation from NHS after hospital birth fault
Disabled man awarded £2.5million compensation from NHS after hospital birth fault
Published 14th Nov 2016

A man has been awarded a £2.5million NHS payout 47 years after suffering catastrophic brain damage at birth.

Peter Atherton was left with severe physical and learning difficulties after being starved of oxygen at Billinge Hospital, Wigan.

Peter Atherton has been awarded a £2.5million NHS payout 47 years after suffering catastrophic brain damage at birth.

Asherton also has cerebral palsy affecting all four of his limbs, memory problems and struggles with communication.

Parents Maurice and Sheila, now in their 70s, have cared for him with little professional help, and no compensation for the errors made at his birth.

A financial settlement has now been approved by the High Court, with the NHS agreeing to the payout without accepting liability.

Speaking outside the court after the verdict, Peter’s mother said: “Peter will be able to have a more comfortable life now.”

Upon winning the compensation Peter’s mother said: “Peter will be able to have a more comfortable life now.

Upon Approving the settlement, Judge Graham Wood QC said: “Where parents have dedicated themselves in the way these parents have, it is only right the court notes and commends their dedication. One hopes now, with the benefit of these funds, that professional care can be provided.

“This gives them some assurance that, should anything happen to them in future, Peter will be very well cared for.”

Source: thesun

-language:EN-US'>It affects muscle movement and also co-ordination, sometimes resulting in a variety of symptoms such as muscle weakness, stiffness, tremors and problems with balance.

 

The campaign aims to highlight the impact of a brain injury and how making a claim can help to improve not only quality of life, but also provide a wider support network for those affected.

Mrs Boreham was able to use the compensation to specially adapt her house and garden in order to make Leona feel as comfortable as possible, as well as paying for high-quality medical equipment and various physiotherapy sessions.

Source: lancashiretelegraph

Mother-of-one awarded £200,000 in compensation after she is left infertile from a medical blunder
Mother-of-one awarded £200,000 in compensation after she is left infertile from a medical blunder
Published 14th Nov 2016

A mother has been awarded £200,000 in damages after she was left infertile following a medical blunder.

Natasha Richardson, 26, was accidentally cut by surgeons during her Caeserean section and developed a flesh-eating bug.

Surgeons were unaware of their error until the receptionist returned to hospital 10 days later suffering from intense stomach pain. 

After being transferred to intensive care and operated on, she was diagnosed with necrotising fasciitis which had eaten away at her womb and surrounding tissue.

She was then transferred for a hysterectomy to remove all of the infection - leaving her unable to extend her family. 

Ms Richardson was told she needed a Caesarean because there were problems with her child's heart.

And despite Noah arriving at a healthy 6lbs 2oz, she was left cut from the operation - but doctors had no idea. 

Because they were not aware of their error she was stitched up while she was suffering internal bleeding.

Doctors soon realised what had happened as she was in severe pain. She was then transferred to intensive care and operated on. 

She was sent home five days after the second operation and she put her weakness, fatigue and pain down to giving birth. 

But it was when she was rushed back to Leeds General Infirmary, where she had given birth, 10 days later that they realised she had developed necrotising fasciitis.

This devastating bug had eaten away at her womb and surrounding stomach muscles and tissue.

She was transferred to a different hospital where they performed a hysterectomy.

Over the following months Ms Richardson had a further six operations to remove all of the bacteria.

This left her with an open wound in her stomach and very little muscles. She had to remain in hospital attached to a vacuum machine to help her open wound heal. 

But her pain continues - as she has now developed a hernia and has terrible scars - with one on her stomach measuring 30cm x 10cm, leaving her conscious over what she wears. 

Because of her lack of stomach muscles, it affects what she can and can't do and it can be painful when Noah jumps on her.

She is also unable to go anywhere alone with him because she is unable to pick him up and carry him.

She is now set to go under the knife again as surgeons attempt to repair the hernia, reconstruct her stomach and to perform plastic surgery.

The Trust has admitted liability for the problems Natasha has faced, which has come as a relief to her, but she is also keen to ensure the Trust learns from this incident and puts steps in place so that this doesn't happen to anybody else.

Professor Suzanne Hinchliffe, deputy chief executive at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, said: 'On behalf of the Trust I would like to express our sincere apologies to Ms Richardson and her family.

'This was an extremely tragic case and we have looked carefully at what occurred and made changes to our Caesarean clinical guidelines as a result.'

Source: dailymail

Settlement for family of school caretaker who died after asthma attack after doctors surgery admits they  failed to manage respiratory symptoms
Settlement for family of school caretaker who died after asthma attack after doctors surgery admits they failed to manage respiratory symptoms
Published 8th Nov 2016

Richard Coxall died after calling 999 from Townley Primary School in Christchurch, near March where he was

working alone during the half-term break. Paramedics quickly arrived at the scene, but despite being able to

see the stricken 48-year-old, they could not reach him because the building’s doors were locked.

 

Despite having a history of asthma in childhood and again in 1998 when he was 35 recorded in

his medical notes, one practice nurse wrongly recording a history of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

meaning he did not receive the correct long-term care.

 

Throughout his treatment, Richard was prescribed antibiotics and several different steroid inhalers for short-

term use. He also was treated with a nebuliser on a number of occasions after calling the out-of-hours service

with breathing difficulties, after which his condition briefly improved.

 

Richard should have in fact been prescribed continuous steroid inhalers from which he should have been

advised to take a minimum dose of two puffs a day. This should have been taken alongside a Salbutamol

inhaler; a medication that opens up the medium and large airways in the lungs.

 

The cause of Richard’s death was recorded as cardiac arrest due to cardiac arrhythmia induced by breathing

problems caused by acute severe asthma.

 

Source: peterboroughtoday

Ipswich Hospital under scrutiny over care of young mother Jessica Rudland
Ipswich Hospital under scrutiny over care of young mother Jessica Rudland
Published 8th Nov 2016

Jessica Rudland, 24, was rushed to the hospital’s accident and emergency department in August 2015

complaining of shortness of breath - just 15 days after giving birth to her son Lewin, her family has said.

 

Jessica, from Ipswich, was diagnosed with an abnormal heart rhythm and was initially prescribed beta blockers.

But when her blood pressure dropped she was given cardioversion – a form of electrical shock treatment –

used to restore the heart back to a normal beat. She later suffered a cardiac arrest, the statement said.

 

It was following the cardiac arrest that her family claim Jessica was “abandoned” for a period of time. Jessica

subsequently spent 13 days in a coma.

 

But it was Ipswich Hospital’s own investigation into the incident, which it is required to conduct with a case of

this severity, that has caused the family concern.

 

Jessica’s father Chris Rudland has claimed the hospital did not follow local and national guidelines when

carrying out its inquiry.

 

“The framework encourages family input in serious investigations,” Mr Rudland said. “In our daughter’s case

the family was excluded from this process, even though her mother Sue was present throughout the

treatment and could add valuable insight into the incident.”

 

Nick Hulme, chief executive of The Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, said the hospital “fully recognised” that its

investigation was “too narrow” and has agreed to commission an independent clinical review of Jessica’s case,

working alongside her family.

 

“We have met with the family many times and it has always been our intention to be open in our well

recognised spirit of transparency,” he added. “A few weeks ago we agreed with the family to commission a

completely independent clinical review and Jessica’s family will be fully involved in defining the terms of

reference or scope of this review.”

 

Over a year later and Jessica’s heart has now stabilised but she suffers slowness of both movement and

speech, say her family, symptoms of what is understood to be a brain injury.

 

The Ipswich and East Suffolk Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) was asked to look into the way Ipswich

Hospital conducted its investigation and has accepted that guidelines were broken.

 

A spokesman said: “The CCG has worked with Jessica’s family and Ipswich Hospital over the last few months.

We will continue to liaise with both parties and support the family during this time.”

 

The case is now being examined by the General Medical Council, the Nursing Medical Council and the Care

Quality Commission, which is the national NHS watchdog.

 

Ms Watts said it was likely that civil action would be pursued against the hospital for its “negligence” in causing

Jessica’s injuries.

 

Source: ipswichstar

'The pain was unbelievable': Dentist pulled out part of man's jawbone in botched tooth extraction
'The pain was unbelievable': Dentist pulled out part of man's jawbone in botched tooth extraction
Published 3rd Oct 2016

A man was paid £10,000 after a dentist pulled out part of his jawbone in a botched tooth extraction.

David Checkland, 63, had to go to hospital after being left with blood streaming down his face following the dental work, the Liverpool Echo reports.

The Security guard worker had visited Atlantic Dental Practice in Croxteth, Liverpool, between 2008 and 2014.

In 2014 he was told by Dr Salman Khan that a tooth in his upper jaw was chronically infected and needed to be extracted.

But, Mr Checkland said during the procedure it became apparent that dentist Dr Khan was struggling to pull the tooth out.

He said: “He was yanking and yanking for ages but wasn’t having any luck.

 “I was getting a bit worried as he didn’t really seem to know what to do – I think he was panicking a bit.”

When Dr Khan did manage to pull the tooth out he pulled a piece of Mr Checkland’s jawbone with it and told him he needed to go to hospital.

Mr Checkland said: “Blood started streaming down my face – it was pouring from my nose and mouth.

“He’d yanked out a piece of jawbone. The pain was unbelievable.

“He stitched me up and told me I needed to go straight to hospital. When I went back to work, people thought I’d been beaten up. My face was black and blue – people couldn’t believe I’d just been to the dentist. It was horrendous.”

Examination of Mr Checkland’s teeth, dental records and X-rays showed decay and infection had been present and apparent in several of his teeth from as early as 2008 but dentists had neglected to treat it.

Mr Checkland said: “It still doesn’t feel right when I chew.

“I have to make sure I only use one side of my mouth. I’ve also lost feeling in the side of my face where he pulled a piece of my jawbone out.

“I don’t understand why he didn’t just stop when he realised he couldn’t get the tooth out – or why he let my teeth get to such a bad level of decay in the first place.”

In August Mr Checkland was paid £10,000 in an out of court settlement.

Source: mirror

Autistic teenager wins multi-million sum after NHS negligence
Autistic teenager wins multi-million sum after NHS negligence
Published 19th Sep 2016

An autistic teenager has won a multi-million pound payout after his parents discovered negligence by NHS staff caused his condition.

For years after Ben Harman's birth, his parents thought his disabilities were just one of life's cruelties and struggled on to make his life as comfortable as possible.

But it was only when they applied for a blue parking badge in 2006 that the truth was "revealed incidentally".

It was finally uncovered that medics at Kent and Canterbury Hospital had negligently failed to diagnose his 'catastrophically low' blood sugar levels after his birth in 2002.

He was eventually given dextrose, but that came too late to save him from devastating brain damage and autism.

A High Court judge ruled: "When he was discharged, his parents were told nothing about the risk that his low blood sugar levels may have caused lasting damage".

Ben’s parents were worried when he failed to meet his milestones, but had no suspicions he may have been a victim of medical negligence.

The judge said that it was in 2006, when the family applied for a blue badge, that the truth came out when the couple were asked for medical evidence to support their application.

Mum Joanne Harman finally sued and the East Kent Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust admitted liability in July 2013.

Following the judge's ruling, Ben, now 13, is in line for massive damages to fund the lifetime of care he will need.

The trust will have to pay his fees at specialist boarding school, Prior's Court in Hermitage, Berkshire, until he is 25.

It will also have to fund his care regime at home.

The compensation figure has yet to be calculated, but it is believed to be a seven-figure sum.

Source: surreycomet

Wife says NHS apology not enough after husband dies an hour after leaving hospital
Wife says NHS apology not enough after husband dies an hour after leaving hospital
Published 19th Sep 2016

The wife of a man who died of pneumonia just an hour after being sent home from hospital says apologies from NHS bosses are not good enough.

Kim Sharp’s husband Richard, 60, died in her arms after being sent home from Nottingham City Hospital in March last year.

And now Mrs Sharp is looking into taking legal action against the hospital.

“You can’t put into words what effect that has on you,” wife Kim said.

 “You can’t describe how it feels. You are just numb.

“It’s not something I can ever forgive - apologies aren’t enough.

Mr Sharp had been diagnosed with lung cancer and had been at a pre-operative clinic at the hospital when medics noticed symptoms of pneumonia.

Despite this though, the illness was not acted upon and he was discharged and sent home to Bilborough. Just over an hour later he collapsed in his wife’s arms and was declared dead despite an ambulance being called.

Mrs Sharp – who was married to her husband for 19 and a half years – said his death has left a gaping hole.

She said: “Obviously I haven’t got my best friend anymore. It’s just so hard. Some mornings I can’t even get up.”

Bosses from Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust have apologised to Mrs Sharp in a letter.

Peter Homa, Chief Executive, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, said: “We reiterate our unreserved apologies to the family for the failings in our care and for letting Mr Sharp down so badly.

“Abnormal results from a pre-operative assessment were not acted upon as they should have been which meant Mr Sharp was discharged from the clinic instead of being admitted as a medical emergency for urgent treatment.

“We have learnt from this tragic case and made changes to improve safety and outcomes for future patients.

“I appreciate that nothing can diminish the family’s loss and our thoughts remain with them.”

Source: nottinghampost


New mum Elise Cattle left with 'surgical packing' inside her body after birth of son in Hull
New mum Elise Cattle left with 'surgical packing' inside her body after birth of son in Hull
Published 19th Sep 2016

A new mum says she was robbed of the chance to properly bond with her newborn baby after a hospital error left her in agonising pain.

Elise Cattle, 27, could not walk properly and suffered months of pain, bleeding and infections following the birth of her son, Freddie, at Hull Women and Children's Hospital.

After five months of complaining to her GP she was examined by a doctor who found that "packing" used to stem bleeding after the birth had accidentally been left inside her body.

The mistake is classed as a "never event" by NHS England – serious incidents that the NHS admits are "wholly preventable" if medical staff follow procedures and systems in place.

Single mum Ms Cattle has revealed what happened to her after figures highlighted how almost 1,200 such "unacceptable serious events" have occurred in hospitals in England over the past four years.

Three-and-a-half years after Freddie's birth, Ms Cattle, a student and part-time nursery nurse, said she still lacks as close a bond with her son as she would like, and feels "jealous" when she sees new mums holding their babies.

She said: "I couldn't sit down for days afterwards, and had to use a rubber ring to sit on.

"When I got home from hospital, the pain just got worse and worse.

"I was laid on the sofa while my mum and dad did everything. It really affected my bond with Freddie. I felt like I'd failed him.

"I still feel like that.

"I had been really looking forward to becoming a mum.

"But now when I see a mum with a newborn baby, I feel jealous, because I couldn't cuddle Freddie like that.

"I couldn't bath Freddie, and had to change his nappies with him lying across my lap. I just couldn't stand the pain."

She said the pain disappeared as soon as the doctor removed the packing.

Mike Wright, chief nurse for Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, said: "An investigation was carried out in connection with Ms Cattle's claim.

"Never events are rare, but when mistakes do happen, we are committed to being open and honest about them.

"While each set of circumstances is different, we are committed to learning from our mistakes to make services safer and improve care."

Source: hulldailymail


Woman hit by car outside Tesco Express store in Bewdley
Woman hit by car outside Tesco Express store in Bewdley
Published 14th Sep 2016

A woman was hit by a car outside a supermarket store in Bewdley.

West Midlands Ambulance Service were called to the Tesco Express store in Load Street, Bewdley, at around 3.55pm on Monday (September 12) after a woman was hit by a car.

A spokesman from WMAS said: "We were called to reports of a collision between a car and a pedestrian in a car park outside Tesco in Bewdley.

"We treated one patient, a woman believed to be in her 80s, and transported her to Worcestershire Royal Hospital.

"We had one ambulance in attendance."

Her injuries are not known.

Source: kidderminstershuttle

Blunder caused severe brain damage for teen
Blunder caused severe brain damage for teen
Published 14th Sep 2016

Anna White was left with brain damage after a routine operation when a tube delivering fluids to her was contaminated

Anna White was left with severe brain damage after a routine operation when a tube delivering fluids to her was contaminated.

She was just 15 when she was taken to the Royal Albert Edward Infirmary in Wigan with appendicitis.

The operation to remove her appendix went well, but in recovery Miss White suddenly stopped breathing.

She later suffered a cardiac arrest, and although doctors revived her, the teenager’s brain was starved of oxygen, causing serious damage.

Once a keen gymnast, Miss White, now 19, is unable to walk or talk. The Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust later admitted the tube used to administer anaesthetic during Miss White’s operation had not been fully flushed out.

When the same tube was used to provide fluids following her surgery, the remaining drug went into her body, and she suffered a respiratory and cardiac arrest.

Her mother Donna, 39, said: ‘It’s like having a new-born baby because everything a baby needs, that’s what I do now ... If this hadn’t happened, she would have been going to university this year.

‘She wanted to become a midwife and she would have achieved it.’

The family is still fighting a legal battle for compensation to ensure Miss White gets the care she needs.

Last December a trust spokesman: ‘The Trust has admitted that the care it provided ... fell below an acceptable standard, and has apologised unreservedly ... Given that legal proceedings ... are ongoing, the Trust is unable to offer further comment at this stage.’

  Source: dailymail

Addenbrooke’s apologises to Cambridge couple after delays led to birth of stillborn baby
Addenbrooke’s apologises to Cambridge couple after delays led to birth of stillborn baby
Published 14th Sep 2016

A couple who were left heartbroken when their baby girl was stillborn after signs of pre-eclampsia were not picked up in time are calling for better treatment for expectant mothers.

Aleksandra Sobolewska was tragically stillborn at the Rosie June 2, 2014 after her mother Olga Boczula, went into hospital feeling unwell and reporting her baby had stopped moving.

Just days before, Olga, 35, who lives in Cambridge with her partner Lukasz Sobolewski, 35, went to see the midwife at a GP surgery complaining she felt unwell and had high blood pressure.

She also had swelling in her feet, headaches and problems with her vision. In two of her previous checkups, she had also complained of similar symptoms.

Rather than referring her straight to hospital the midwife discussed the symptoms with a doctor, and it was decided that she did not need to be referred to the hospital and was told to return to the surgery after the weekend.

But after continuing to feel unwell and getting worse by the Sunday, she went to the Rosie where she was told the tragic news that her daughter would be stillborn.

Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH) has now admitted liability on behalf of the community midwife and agreed to pay damages

A CUH spokesman said: “The Trust sent Olga Boczula and Lukasz Sobolewski a full apology in September last year, acknowledging failings were made. We are pleased the matter has now been settled."

Source: Cambridge-news

l trusts.”

 

Source: theargus

Hospital errors cost £25m compensation
Hospital errors cost £25m compensation
Published 14th Sep 2016

Almost £25 million has been paid out by the NHS to compensate for mistakes made at Sussex hospitals.

The figure was spent in one year period to deal with claims made by patients, relatives and staff.

The figure, which includes damages as well as legal costs involved, covers April 2015 to the end of March but includes cases that happened in previous years because it can take time to reach a settlement.

Compensation claims are dealt with by the national NHS Litigation Authority, which paid out £13,497,633 for cases involving Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust.

This includes £11.5m awarded in December to a five-year-old who was severely brain damaged at birth at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton.

Payouts linked to Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Trust reached £6,663,758 and Brighton and East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust was £4,348,788.

Solicitors say for many claimants it is not just about money but also because of concerns about how complaints are handled.

They say people often feel it can be the only way to get the full explanation they need.

A Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals spokesman said: “We take patient safety extremely seriously at all times and we fully investigate any incident that gives rise to a complaint or legal claim to try to ensure it does not happen again.

“It is important to make clear that payments made by the NHS Litigation Authority are not a reflection of the level of safety or quality of services within individual trusts.”

Source: theargus

Shannon Airport emergency landing: 12 taken to hospital
Shannon Airport emergency landing: 12 taken to hospital
Published 1st Sep 2016

Twelve people, including three children, have been injured on a transatlantic flight after it encountered "severe and unexpected turbulence".

The incident prompted the United Airlines flight to make an emergency landing in the Republic of Ireland.

Ten passengers and two crew members were taken to hospital from Shannon Airport shortly before 06:00 BST.

All have now been discharged with the exception of one flight attendant.

The United Airlines flight was travelling from Houston, Texas, to London Heathrow when it diverted to the airport in County Clare.

Passenger Gregory Giagnocavo explains what severe turbulence feels like

One of the passengers on the plane, John Dunton-Downer from London, said it felt like they were going to crash.

'It felt like the plane was going down'

"We reached the mid-Atlantic when, suddenly, there was a sensation of the plane slamming into mid-air. It felt like it was made of paper and hitting a solid object," he said.

"People, including babies, hit the ceiling and there was a lot of screaming. It felt like the plane was going down.

"We were told to get out of our seats and sit on the floor.

"The captain said that we had hit turbulence due to unforeseen weather circumstances."

After the plane landed at Shannon Airport, the injured were taken to University Hospital Limerick, with cuts, bruises and minor head injuries.

"As of 10:30, one patient was still being assessed and the remaining 11 were discharged," said the hospital.

"Hospital staff are working with the airline to transport the passengers back to Shannon Airport to continue their onward journey to London."

Source: BBC

C&S Solicitors are a specialist personal injury firm dealing with aviation accidents, we have experience dealing with the Montreal convention and have dealt with accidents on board airlines including multiple fractures, brain injury and soft tissue type injuries. We have experience in liaising with US law firms on behalf of our clients and would welcome the opportunity to discuss any needs you would need following this incident.

Insurance Rip Off
Insurance Rip Off
Published 1st Sep 2016

There has been a failure by the motor insurance industry to pass savings from personal injury reforms on to consumers was uncovered this week by APIL (Association of Personal Injury Lawyers), generating national headlines.

APIL approached The Times with figures purchased from the Association of British Insurers (ABI) which show insurers have saved nearly £1billion since reforms aimed at reducing premiums were introduced in 2013.

In the article last weekend, House of Commons transport select committee chair Louise Ellman said: “The bottom line is that the insurance industry promised that they would reduce premiums as whiplash claims fell and, if they haven’t done it, they’ve reneged on their promise”.

Ian Cummings the Head of personal injury Claims at C&S Solicitors and the West Midlands coordinator for APIL stated at a time when the country is being asked to tighten its belt the insurance industry have raised premiums despite making almost a billion pounds worth of savings. It is time the insurers stopped taking the consumer for a mug and started passing on these huge savings to the consumers as they promised they would.”

Boy, 3, had both legs and seven fingers amputated after docs mistook deadly toxic shock syndrome for tonsillitis
Boy, 3, had both legs and seven fingers amputated after docs mistook deadly toxic shock syndrome for tonsillitis
Published 24th Aug 2016

A boy aged 3 had to have both legs and seven fingers removed after NHS doctors failed to diagnose potentially fatal toxic shock syndrome.

Reuben Harvey-Smith was first rushed to hospital after accidentally burning himself at the family home last summer.

But just two days later the three-year-old was back in A&E with a high fever and sore throat which was misdiagnosed as tonsillitis.

And then Less than a day later Reuben was fighting for his life as toxic shock syndrome took hold.

Reuben’s mum Lou revealed at one point she thought he little boy wasn’t going to make it through the treatment.

“The consultant had tears in her eyes when she told me he would have to undergo an amputation.

Lou said: “The first time he saw that his legs had been cut off from just below his knees, he just said, ‘Poorly feet gone, get new ones.'”

“I’m speaking out because I want to raise awareness of toxic shock and sepsis.

“More needs to be done so that the medical profession recognise the link between burns injuries and toxic shock.”

Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust has admitted full liability for the blunder offered an unreserved apology to Reuben and his family.

In a statement the they said: “We are now working with the family to ensure that lessons are learnt from Reuben’s case and further training has been provided to A&E staff on recognising the warning signs of septic shock treatment.

“The Trust are committed to ensuring that Reuben is appropriately compensated so that he has the care, prostheses and equipment that he needs throughout his life.”

Lady died at King's College Hospital, London, following failed blood transfusion, inquest hears
Lady died at King's College Hospital, London, following failed blood transfusion, inquest hears
Published 24th Aug 2016

An inquest has found a woman died following neglect from a hospital after giving birth.  

Park Wood mum-to-be Abimbola Babatola was rushed to Tunbridge Wells Hospital in July last year with an unrelated issue.

She was transferred to King's College Hospital in London the next day. 

The 39-year-old was heavily pregnant, and three weeks later was given an emergency caesarean section after she went into natural labour. 

Although her daughter, Vivienne, survived, the St Catherine’s Road resident died at the Denmark Hill hospital on Friday, July 31. 

The three-day inquest was held at Southwark Coroner's Court by senior coroner Dr Andrew Harris. 

A report states Nigerian-born Mrs Babatola died from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy - a brain injury caused by lack of oxygen, collapse after caesarean section, post-partum haemorrhage, and sickle cell disease. 

She had been unconscious since Monday, July 13, when she was declared brain dead. She died at 6.24am on July 31.  

Just days before the C-section, doctors found Mrs Babatola had suffered from suspected pulmonary embolism - a blockage in her lungs - and was treated with blood-thinning medication. 

The coroner concluded her death was caused by natural causes, contributed to by a failure to help her deteriorating condition after her operation in the recovery ward.

He said this "amounted to neglect". 

The coroner found an intravenous tube, which staff thought was giving her fluids after her C-section, was not working.

The real issue lay in the fact that she was not given a blood transfusion however. 

Before she gave birth, this procedure had not been performed on Mrs Babatola. She had also been suffering from pains related to her sickle cell disease, caused by blood vessels becoming blocked.

Dr Harris added: "I conclude a failure to escalate her care by 5.30am has contributed to her death on the balance of probabilities." 

"I am satisfied with regard to the omissions that have contributed to her death, which all constitute the provision or procurement of basic medical care."

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has issued the following statement in relation to this case: "We would like to extend our heartfelt condolences to Mrs Babatola’s family for their loss. We know this must continue to be an extremely difficult time for them.

"As anyone who was at the inquest will have heard, the death of Abimbola Babatola profoundly affected the staff involved in caring for her.

"Although maternal deaths of this kind are extremely rare, we carried out a full internal investigation into the circumstances surround Mrs Babatola’s care.

"As a result, we have made changes to strengthen the standards of maternity care at King’s College Hospital.

Source: kentonline

TV presenter 'died in agony after waiting four hours for treatment in A&E'
TV presenter 'died in agony after waiting four hours for treatment in A&E'
Published 24th Aug 2016

Paul Gage, a former news presenter, was rushed to Whittington Hospital, in north London, with severe abdominal pain

A former TV presenter died from “catastrophic” internal bleed after spending four hours waiting on a trolley to see a doctor at an “overcrowded” A&E, an inquest heard.

Paul Gage, 59, was marked as needing assessment with 10 minutes after he was rushed to the Whittington Hospital , in north London, with severe abdominal pain at around 7pm on March 17 this year.

But St Pancras Coroner’s Court heard the father of three, who used the working name Paul George, was forced to wait for four hours lying on a trolley in agony until he was diagnosed with a suspected aneurysm in his stomach at around 11pm.

The aneurysm - a weakness in the blood vessel wall - ruptured at around midnight while he waited for a scan.

He was transferred to the nearby Royal Free Hospital where he died on the operating table.

Stephen Moore, the hospital’s head nurse, told the inquest: “The department was under a great deal of pressure. [It] had more patients than it had capacity for at the time.”

The hospital’s emergency department was severely overcrowded on March 17, the night Mr Gage arrived, and did not have enough resources to cope, the court was told.

A spokesman for the Whittington said after the hearing: “In March Mr Gage visited our emergency department complaining of abdominal pain.

“It was a very busy evening with a high number of very unwell patients.

“Mr Gage faced a longer wait for an assessment by a doctor than we aim to provide.

“His condition subsequently deteriorated and he was treated and transferred to a neighbouring hospital for surgery. Mr Gage sadly died later that night.

“We would like to offer our sincere condolences to the family of Mr Gage. In the day’s following Mr Gage’s death, we conducted a full investigation into the circumstances surrounding his visit to our emergency department.

Source: mirror

Stoke Heath man receives £2million NHS settlement after routine op left him paralysed
Stoke Heath man receives £2million NHS settlement after routine op left him paralysed
Published 24th Aug 2016

A former social worker from Bromsgrove, who once cared for people with spinal injuries, has received a £2million settlement from the NHS after a routine hip operation left him paralysed from the waist down.

Stephen Onley, 56, of Stoke Heath, was given an epidural at Birmingham Royal Orthopaedic Hospital during routine resurfacing surgery on his right hip in 2010.

Despite expressing his reluctance to have an epidural, Stephen was persuaded to agree to the one last minute to control post-operative pain, but there were complications, causing a lack of blood flow to his spine.

Stephen said: “I had spent more than 35 years caring for people with spinal injuries and so I was only too aware that epidurals carry a small, but nevertheless serious, risk of paralysis. I had made up my mind not to have an epidural under any circumstances but was told that it was recommended.”

After the operation, medics failed to carry out routine blood pressure tests and within hours, Stephen’s blood pressure had fallen dangerously low and a lack of blood to his spinal cord had already caused irreparable damage.

It wasn’t until two days after the surgery that night staff suspected something had gone wrong, when Stephen appeared to have no feeling or movement below the waist.

An MRI scan later confirmed that Stephen would never walk again and he had also suffered a perforated bowel during surgery.

Five years on, a settlement has been secured for Stephen, which will enable him to make his home more accessible, build a hydrotherapy pool and buy wheelchairs, equipment and an adapted car to help him continue his therapy.

He will also receive annual payments to pay for his daily care and support.

Stephen with the financial support he requires.”

The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust has admitted full responsibility for the irreversible spinal damage which occurred as a result of failing to correctly monitor him, as well as Stephen’s perforated bowel.

A spokesperson for The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust said: “We would like to extend our most sincere apologies to Mr Onley for what happened in 2010. We are pleased that this settlement will support him going forward but we are of course sorry that it has been necessary.

“We regularly review all our policies and procedures, including those which focus on post-operative care and deteriorating patients, to ensure they are in line with national guidance. After serious incidents such as this one, we try to establish exactly what has happened and why. It is using this knowledge that we can prevent similar incidents in the future.”

Source: dudleynews

Parents of disabled Vasili Kalisperas call for NHS brain damage screening
Parents of disabled Vasili Kalisperas call for NHS brain damage screening
Published 24th Aug 2016

The parents of a child left severely brain damaged by a blunder at a Worcester hospital have slammed an NHS decision not to screen babies for jaundice.

The family of Vasili Kalisperas of St John's, Worcester, are dismayed about Public Health England’s decision not to screen babies at risk of a catastrophic and preventable type of brain damage and say lives will be put at risk as a result.

Vasili Kalisperas was born at Worcestershire Royal Hospital on May 18, 2012.

His father Michael Kalisperas nicknamed him ‘Spartan’ because of his strength.

The nickname quickly took on a new meaning when, two days later, Vasili returned to the hospital, unaware he was about to face a fight for his life.

He became severely ill after a student midwife who visited the family alone at their Highfield Road home did not follow guidelines when he was showing symptoms of jaundice.

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust has admitted liability for his illnesses, saying it was deeply sorry for the mistakes which left Vasili with cerebral palsy, virtually blind, deaf and with diagnosed kernicterus, a form of brain damage.

In a statement released online on August 3, Public Health England said the UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) had found there was insufficient evidence for a national screening programme for kernicterus.

Michael Kalisperas' son Vasili was at high risk of kernicterus after developing jaundice within 24-hours of his birth.

Mr Kalisperas is now petitioning Prime Minister Theresa May to reverse the decision by Public Health England.

Mr Kalisperas said: “I am devastated by this decision, how many more children and families have to have their lives devastated before the NHS takes preventing kernicterus seriously? Screening could have saved my son and many others yet they have been left severely disabled for the rest of their lives.

“As parents you trust that the healthcare professionals who see your baby know what they are doing.

"For us that trust was betrayed in one of the worst possible ways as the advice we were given was completely wrong and basic mistakes were made.

"A screening programme could help to prevent the mistakes that continue to be made.”

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust was unavailable for comment.

Source: dudleynews

Brave mum survives baby birth drama after doctors twice missed internal bleeding
Brave mum survives baby birth drama after doctors twice missed internal bleeding
Published 24th Aug 2016

A new mum has told how she TWICE suffered potentially fatal internal bleeding days after giving birth - but was sent home with just antibiotics.

Emma Eden, 25, collapsed at her home in Redditch on two occasions in the days after giving birth to her fourth child, Max.

Both times she was rushed to Worcester Royal Hospital, some 17 miles away, because maternity services had been transferred from the Alexandra hospital - just minutes from her house.

Doctors discovered she had a retained placenta, which had not been fully removed at birth.

Emma faced a number of emergency trips to the Royal in her final weeks, including a false alarm when she could not feel her baby moving.

Eventually, seven days overdue, she went into labour at home at 5am. Her father drove her the 35 minutes to Worcester, where her mother’s instincts told her that the birth was not going to plan.

Emma said: “I remember saying, ‘something’s wrong’ because my contractions were not regular.

 

“I just remember I wanted it over, I was crying, was taking gas and air - I was panicking.

“I think I just blanked out because the next thing I knew I heard someone say, ‘Emma, look down, your baby is here’. I thought, when did that happen?!’

Max was born weighing 7Ib 1Ib, but the problems had only just started for Emma.

She added: “Not long after that the midwife was tugging on my placenta. Yet with all my other children, they had left it a good five to ten minutes

“I thought again that something was wrong, as it was not budging. It took her three attempts before it slowly came out.”

The following day Emma and baby were allowed home.

But on Saturday February 6 she started bleeding and faced another emergency dash to the Royal via ambulance.

Emma was eventually told a piece of placenta had been left behind in the womb and she faced an operation to have it removed. Yet she claims she was not the only one confused at what was happening, with two theatre staff thinking she was there for a termination.

The scared mum spent the night in hospital, alone, miles from home and away from her new baby.

The following day Emma was prescribed antibiotics and allowed home.

But just days later on February 11 she suffered more bleeding and was rushed back to Worcester.

She said: “It was like a waterfall of blood, yet at the hospital they made me feel like I was lying.

Emma was sent home again but was readmitted the following day after the bleeding continued.

She said: “They were going to send me home again, but my mum said ‘no, she is not leaving until you sort her out. She told them, ‘There is something wrong.’”

Emma was put on a ward for three days but claims she was given no information about what was happening, even after she had been take to theatre.

She said: “It was awful. I asked what was going on, but no-one was available to tell me.

It was only when the midwife visited Emma at home the day after she was discharged that she says she was finally told her womb had been scraped to remove the last traces of the retained placenta.

The trauma of her ordeal saw her suffering weeks of panic attacks - which left her unable to leave the house.

 

Worryingly, Emma has subsequently learned that there may be long-term medical consequences because of what happened to her at Worcester Royal, including possible future fertility issues.

Emma is now over her panic attacks, and is slowly recovering from her ordeal, thanks to the loving support of John and her family.

She has put in a complaint to West Midlands Ambulance Service about her treatment and is considering a complaint against Worcester Royal Hospital.

Source: birminghammail

NHS sets aside £56 billion for compensation claims as payouts for medical blunders soar
NHS sets aside £56 billion for compensation claims as payouts for medical blunders soar
Published 22nd Aug 2016

Experts say the NHS is sitting on a 'timebomb' of future claims and legal reform is needed to tackle the problem.

The amount of NHS cash set aside for medical negligence compensation hit £56billion last year – an amount almost half its annual budget.

MPs have demanded a probe into why costs have been allowed to ¬balloon to record levels at the NHS Litigation Authority, which provides cover for the NHS against claims, the Sunday People reveals.

The incredible figure from a ¬report out this week, works out at
£2,217 per taxpayer in England. The NHSLA study also says compensation payments and legal costs are up 27% to almost £1.5million.

Dr Christine Tomkins, chief ¬executive of the Medical Defence Union, which insures medics, said: “The NHS is sitting on a timebomb of future claims. Legal reform is the only way to keep money within the NHS for treatment of patients.”

Conservative MP Richard Bacon said: “The Society of Clinical Injury Lawyers say in many cases it is the NHSLA and trusts that drive costs. They say failure to make early and prompt admissions is a problem and too many valid claims are settled late.”

Other MPs agree. Fellow Tory Sir Edward Garnier said: “Most ¬complainants just want someone to take responsibility. The defensive failure to apologise often causes more heartache than the n¬egligence. Claimants see they have to sue to get justice.”

Steve Webber, chairman of the SCIL, said: “In most cases the NHSLA insists on a full investigation, which in many cases is not needed. It can take years and costs mount up. And in 76 per cent of cases the NHSLA lose. If any other firm had a success rate like that there would be an inquiry straight away.”

A proposed consultation into ¬capping injury claims was scrapped earlier this year and no new date for it has been announced. But sources say a new investigation will look at a wider picture of NHS litigation.

The NHSLA and NHS refused to comment on the new figures.

Source: Mirror

The headline figure of £56 billion and half of the NHS budget is a false representation this is a figure which covers years and years of cases under the old funding system which has since been scrapped therefore reducing future lawyer's fees by about 40% under the new system that has been brought in. 

In addition the figures for 2013-2014 were 1.1 billion and 2014-2015 were 1.4 billion for each financial year. Misrepresenting and scaremongering by the so called experts is simply wrong and proper figures with the caveat of the reforms already in place should be fully explained. Thankfully MPs agree that it is the NHS that needs reforming not the legal system supporting the patient when the NHS has wronged them. Dr Tomkins is playing politics which frankly when people are killed or injured as a result of poor or inadequate treatment by her members is abhorrent. - C&S Solicitors

Disabled woman hospitalised with dehydration after week in Whitley Bay care home
Disabled woman hospitalised with dehydration after week in Whitley Bay care home
Published 22nd Aug 2016
The family of a disabled woman who had to be hospitalised with severe dehydration and weight loss after a week in a Whitley Bay care home has been awarded a four-figure settlement.

Joanne Buck, who suffered from cerebral palsy and sadly died in April 2014, spent a week of respite care at the Seaview home in June 2012.

Joanne’s parents Joan and Alan called the home every day to check on their 34-year-old daughter, and were told there were no problems.

But the family say they were “absolutely distraught” when Joanne returned to her family home in Seaham, County Durham, having lost a “significant” amount of weight.

“She was so thin – how on earth that could have happened in a week was shocking,” said Alan.

Joanne required a soft diet as her cerebral palsy meant she had difficulty eating and drinking. She also needed support at meal times to ensure she was eating and drinking enough.

Alan said: “She could only take her medicine on a spoon with food.

“We feel that she clearly wasn’t getting food, and if she wasn’t getting food it means she wasn’t getting her medication.”

Joanne’s mother, Joan, said: “I was absolutely distraught when she came home.

“When she was in there I phoned every day asking if she was OK and the reply I got was that she was eating well and sleeping well.

“I could tell straight away she had lost weight and she looked very unwell.

“We immediately contacted her GP who organised an ambulance straight away to take Joanne to hospital. He was so worried about her he phoned the hospital three times while we waited for the ambulance.”

Joanne was admitted to Sunderland Royal Hospital where it was found she was dehydrated. She spent seven days in hospital and weighed just 3 stone 7lb.

She was treated for severe dehydration, low potassium, weight loss and aspiration pneumonia, which is caused when inhaling a foreign substance.

They have now secured a £3,000 settlement from Northridge Healthcare Limited, which operates the care home, despite the company denying liability for the problems Joanne suffered.

Joan is now calling for improved respite care for adults, saying, “We felt Joanne was not given the treatment she deserved by Seaview and believe her experience shows that respite care for vulnerable adults need to be improved.

Source: chroniclelive
 Families 'going through hell' due to delays in NHS clinical negligence trials
Families 'going through hell' due to delays in NHS clinical negligence trials
Published 22nd Aug 2016
Delays in clinical negligence trials cost millions and make families “go through hell”, experts warn.

Last week it was revealed the provision for legal costs set aside by the NHS Litigation Authority, which provides cover for against claims, is a record £56billion.

Now the reluctance of lawyers to settle cases quickly, leading to unnecessary delays, is being blamed for helping to ramp up the total.

Peter Walsh, chief executive of the charity Action against Medical Accidents, said: “Families are being put through hell. If the NHS investigated these incidents properly at the beginning they would know they’re liable and should offer to settle cases much earlier.”

He added: “There will always be mistakes but what happens all too often is that delays add insult to injury.”

Patient Clare Wadey had to wait four years for the NHSLA to pay out after ¬doctors failed to investigate an infection she had properly.

Clare, from Dartford, Kent, said: “My case was never about money – I wanted them to say sorry. In the first letter they sent me they admitted they had done wrong. So how come it took four years for them to settle?”

Derek Crowe, 71, also waited four years for the NHSLA to ¬settle after he was caused unnecessary pain by unsuccessful surgery to insert a catheter.

Derek said: “It was very frustrating. The whole thing was like banging my head against a brick wall for years.”

In another case a delayed diagnosis led to a hospital patient’s death in 2013 but it was 2016 before the case came to trial.

An investigation by Jeremy Hunt’s Health Department into the incredible £56billion sum is expected later this year. The figure, almost half the NHS budget, works out at £2,217 per taxpayer in England.

Compensation payments and legal costs have also soared by 27 per cent.

Dr Christine Tomkins of insurers the Medical Defence Union said: “The NHS is sitting on a timebomb of future claims.”

Source: mirror
Leicester hospitals have highest maternity payouts in the UK
Leicester hospitals have highest maternity payouts in the UK
Published 17th Aug 2016
Leicester's hospitals have the highest compensation payout figures for maternity care failings of any other NHS
trust in England.

New figures from the NHS Litigation Authority show in 2014/15 a total of £325 million in obstetric claims was
paid out on behalf of 146 trusts.

University Hospitals of Leicester, with its sites at Glenfield, Leicester Royal Infirmary and Leicester General,
was at the top of the table with £10.9 million granted due to medical blunders.

The most recent statistics follow a similar pattern of huge payouts across various departments over the last few
years because of clinical negligence.

In March 2015 medical indemnity body, the Medical Defence Union (MDU) called on the Government to take action to
prevent increases in the multi-million compensation awards affecting Leicester’s hospitals.

They said during 2014 the NHS Litigation Authority had paid out more than £15 million in cash redress for
patients and legal fees, while since 2008 more than £80 million had been awarded.

One example of deficiency in maternity care was highlighted during an inquest this April into the death of two-
day-old Delilah Hubbard.

The trust had already admitted a number of failings in Delilah’s care which were then acknowledged during the
hearing.

Recording a narrative verdict the coroner said monitoring of both mother and baby was inadequate during labour,
note-taking was not contemporaneous leading to a lack of communication and crucially had a caesarean section been
carried out earlier, Delilah would have lived.

The trust has apologised to the parents and said changes have been made to practices.

Source: hinckleytimes

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence
claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family
may encounter.
Death of 'fit and healthy' grandmother sparks weekend hospital staffing level warning
Death of 'fit and healthy' grandmother sparks weekend hospital staffing level warning
Published 17th Aug 2016
Coroner described death of Margaret Gleeson as a 'genuine tragedy'

Weekend hospital staffing levels are a cause for concern following the death of a fit and healthy grandmother, a
coroner has warned.

Margaret Gleeson, 70, died on a Sunday 48 hours after having a routine hernia operation at the Royal Albert
Edward Infirmary in Wigan, Greater Manchester.

Coroner Simon Jones, leading an inquest at Bolton Crown Court, described the death of Mrs Gleeson as a ‘genuine
tragedy’.

Mr Jones concluded weekend staffing levels at the hospital did not contribute to the death, but said the issues
‘vividly’ described by senior doctors and nurses on shift that weekend were a concern.

Mr Jones said: “She was a fit and healthy 70-year-old woman who went into hospital for a routine operation.

“In the vast majority of cases she would have come home.”

A three-day inquest heard senior consultants from the Wigan trust describe the challenges of caring for patients
at weekends.

One surgeon said patients were ‘not getting the attention they deserved’ on Saturdays and Sundays.

Mrs Gleeson underwent surgery at Royal Albert Edward Infirmary, Wigan

Mr Jones said he planned to file a Regulation 28 report on weekend working at the Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh
NHS Foundation Trust to help prevent deaths in similar circumstances in the future.

He said: “Though this is a national issue in terms of the NHS as a whole, my duty as a coroner is regarding the
Royal Albert Infirmary in Wigan.”

Medics believed the surgery to remove Mrs Gleeson’s hernia in October 2015 had been a success.

But her condition began to rapidly deteriorate the day after the procedure.

Doctors incorrectly diagnosed Mrs Gleeson with Ileas - a condition where the bowel goes into a state of paralysis
after surgery.

It was later discovered the tissue in her abdomen had been torn during surgery - a very rare complication.

Mrs Gleeson was rushed back to theatre in the early hours where she suffered a cardiac arrest as she was
anaesthetised.

She died the following day.

Mr Jones said Mrs Gleeson’s death was caused by cardiac failure caused by acute myocardial ischaemia and septic
shock.

Source: mirror

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence
claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Revealed: The most serious medical blunders made at Merseyside hospitals
Revealed: The most serious medical blunders made at Merseyside hospitals
Published 15th Aug 2016
Five patients were given the wrong surgery and another was given an insulin overdose

These are the potentially life-changing blunders made at Merseyside hospitals over the past 10 months.

They include five cases of patients being given the wrong operations and even a surgical object being left inside
someone after the surgery had ended.

There have been 11 ‘never events’ – so called because they should never happen – at Merseyside hospitals since
May last year, according to NHS England.

Every time a ‘never event’ occurs, it must be reported to the authorities and investigated to make sure similar
mistakes do no happen again.

'Never events' at Merseyside hospitals:

Five cases of 'wrong site surgery'

Two cases of drugs being administered by 'wrong route'

One overdose of insulin

One wrong implant or prosthesis

One 'foreign object' left inside body after surgery

Feeding tube wrongly inserted into patient's lungs

Dr Peter Williams, medical director of the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, said:
“We take ‘never events’ extremely seriously, we are open about them, we learn from them and we take action to
make further improvements in the care we provide to patients.”

A spokesman for Alder Hey said: “We take any incident extremely seriously and conduct a thorough investigation to
identify the cause of any incident, recommend key learnings and reduce the likelihood of similar incidents
happening in the future.”

Dianne Brown, director of nursing and midwifery at Liverpool Women’s Hospital, added: “The trust does not
experience many ‘never events’.

“However, when we do, the public can be assured that we investigate them thoroughly and try to learn as much from
them as we can so as to ensure they do not happen again.”

Source: liverpoolecho
Senior NHS weight-loss surgeon struck off after six patients die in horrific circumstances
Senior NHS weight-loss surgeon struck off after six patients die in horrific circumstances
Published 15th Aug 2016
A leading weight-loss surgeon who also acted as an expert in cases of clinical negligence has been struck off
after committing a string of what's been described as "deplorable" mistakes in the care of his patients. Dugal
Heath, 59, a Fellow at the Royal College of Surgeons, was criticised by a medical tribunal for his clinical
performance relating to six patients who died in two years.

Grieving relatives said this week of their relief after hearing the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service's
(MPTS) decision to remove Heath from the medical register. The parents of one young mother who passed away said:
"It won't bring our daughter back and will never make it easier for our granddaughter, who has lost her mum, but
we're glad he was struck off. He won't be able to do it to anyone else."

Heath's errors – described in a MPTS hearing last month as "extraordinary" and doing "irremediable" damage –
included subjecting patients to the wrong procedures, accidentally damaging internal organs during surgery and
even accusing a patient who starved for months on end of making up her illness.

One individual who went in for a routine gastric bypass came out with a damaged liver, an injured colon and a
torn bowel due to Heath's "rough" handling and poor use of medical instruments. The patient died a week later.

Another died having suffered heavy internal bleeding while under Heath's knife, with the patient closed up and
left haemorrhaging in the hospital ward. A third effectively starved for months on end after a blockage in her
intestine was not found, and she was told by Heath that her symptoms were "psychological".

The Whittington NHS Hospital in north London – where Heath was employed as a senior consultant – this week
apologised to those affected by Heath's misconduct, saying it was "truly sorry". It now faces a string of
potentially costly legal cases, with relatives of Heath's former patients alleging a failure in the duty of care.

Source: ibtimes
Motorcyclist who lost job after suffering terrible injuries in accident receives compensation
Motorcyclist who lost job after suffering terrible injuries in accident receives compensation
Published 15th Aug 2016

The last thing Richard Wiltshire remembers is leaving Tesco at around 8pm with nappies for his grandchild.

The next moment he was coming around after five days in intensive care at Southmead Hospital, with no knowledge
of how he found himself there.

The 50-year-old later learnt that on his way home to Brislington on his motorbike a car had pulled out of a
driveway on Callington Road and attempted to do a u-turn.

As a result Richard, 50, was given no chance of avoiding the collision and he was thrown from his bike and
underneath the vehicle.

The impact had left him with fractures to his right arm, left leg and face, a bleed on his brain and lacerations
to his spleen.

"Everything I am telling you is what I have been told by other people because it's a complete blur for me."
Richard says of the accident in July last year.

"The last thing I remember is leaving Tesco. Luckily for me there were three independent witnesses but
frustratingly I don't know who they are. I would like to know because one woman stayed with me until the
ambulance came and I would love to say thank you."

Worried by his tardiness, his wife of 26 years, Paula, had driven the grandchildren to the scene to look for him,
before seeing the police roadblock and realising the awful truth.

Understandably officers were unable to tell her if Richard was dead or alive and she travelled to hospital in the
back of a police car sick to the stomach.

"In many ways it was far worse for my family because I had no idea what was going on,"

Thankfully he pulled through but his injuries meant that his job as a production engineer for GKN Aerospace was
no longer something he could continue and he took voluntary redundancy.

"I liked work, it was a good team and we all got on well," he said.

"It took me abroad and was a very satisfying job. It felt like you were part of a big family and that's what I
miss the most."

As a result of his injuries his "brilliant wife" Paula had to quit her part time job to look after Richard who
for the first four months out of hospital was bed-ridden and needed 24 hour care.

Richard has now been awarded compensation.

Source: bristolpost
Huge damages payout for boy who suffered life-changing brain injuries days after birth
Huge damages payout for boy who suffered life-changing brain injuries days after birth
Published 6th Jul 2016

A boy who suffered devastating brain injuries just days after his birth at a Wirral hospital is set to receive massive damages.

The youngster was a victim of medical negligence which left him needing care for the rest of his life, the High Court in London heard.

In a complex case, Judge Jonathan Simpkiss was told how problems arose from guidance given to the boy’s mum on how to breastfeed.

His birth at Arrowe Park was “uneventful”, although his birth weight was low, and the mum indicated her intention to breast feed her tot, a decision described as “natural and understandable”.

After 36 hours, the mum and her baby were discharged home, but she encountered difficulties with her newborn “successfully engaging with breastfeeding”.

After two days at home, and reports by the mother that her baby was not feeding, he suffered a seizure and was readmitted to hospital.

He later suffered “serious injuries” to his brain and will require “care for the rest of his life”.

Judge Simpkiss said allegations of negligence had also been made in relation to “advice given to mother”.

Approving the settlement, he described it as a “tragic case”.

And Judge Simpkiss added: “Damages have not yet been assessed but clearly will be a significant sum.”

Source: liverpoolecho

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Mother is left incontinent, needing crutches to walk and in constant agony after A&E doctors missed serious spinal condition
Mother is left incontinent, needing crutches to walk and in constant agony after A&E doctors missed serious spinal condition
Published 6th Jul 2016

A mother-of-four says her life has been 'devastated' after A&E doctors missed a serious spinal condition that needed emergency surgery.

Michelle Turner, 41, has been left incontinent and unable to walk without crutches and in constant pain after doctors at the Royal Berkshire Hotel missed the signs of cauda equina syndrome (CES).

The condition causes the nerves in the lower back to suddenly become compressed and requires emergency surgery as it can result in nerve damage, paralysis and incontinence if not treated. 

She says she is a 'shadow of her former self' as the mistake caused the breakdown of her 12-year relationship and means she is unable to play with her four children. 

The hospital has now apologised and admitted liability for the mistake - and she is awaiting a compensation settlement. 

Mrs Turner had an eight year history of sciatica - pain caused by irritation or compression of the sciatic nerve, which runs from the pelvis to the feet - before she developed CES.

On June 2, 2011 she woke up to discover the pain was stabbing and intense and it became so bad she lost the ability to walk over the course of the day and had to drag herself up the stairs to bed.

But when she attended the Royal Berkshire Hospital's A&E department at 10.30pm the same night - barely able to stand due to the pain - doctors failed to carry out an MRI scan and she was sent home.

Mrs Turner claims the A&E doctor she spoke to was 'keen to go home' and said she overhead another doctor stating she should have finished her shift 'two hours earlier'.

She says she is a 'shadow of her former self' as the mistake caused the breakdown of her 12-year relationship. She can no longer be active.

The hospital trust has apologised to Mrs Turner. Its chief executive said: 'I deeply regret the standard of care was inadequate and that this has caused you to suffer.'  Mrs Turner is now awaiting a settlement.

Source: dailymail

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Wolverhampton's New Cross Hospital forced to pay out over botched operation after appeal thrown out
Wolverhampton's New Cross Hospital forced to pay out over botched operation after appeal thrown out
Published 6th Jul 2016

New Cross Hospital will be forced to pay out compensation to a woman who underwent a botched hip operation which left her unable to work after its case was thrown out by the Court of Appeal.

Last year, the High Court ruled that a surgeon at New Cross had failed in a hip operation to detect and remove bone cement – a medical sealant - which had escaped from the socket of the hip bone of June Evans, aged 79.

The failure to spot the bone cement had left Ms Evans with permanent sciatic nerve damage, unable to walk and in a huge amount of pain. Her home also required modifications because of her limited mobility.

But the Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust refused to accept the High Court's ruling and took Ms Evans through an 18-month appeals process before the Court of Appeal ruled in her favour last week.

She said: “I am in more pain after the operation than I was before. I’ve been in a wheelchair ever since as I cannot walk anymore. Coping with that day to day is bad enough but it’s appalling that the Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust added to my worries by refusing to accept the decision against them in the High Court and forced me to go through an 18-month appeal process before they lost again.

“Trying to cope with the damage that was done to my sciatic nerve has been difficult as I have had no money to adapt my home. The compensation will go some way to helping me get my independence back and I am grateful to Thompsons who have supported me throughout.”

Dr Jonathan Odum, Medical Director for the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, said: “We accept and acknowledge the findings of the court and wish to apologise to Ms Evans for the problems she has encountered since surgery in 2011.”

Source: expressandstar

C&S Solicitors currently deal with claims relating to New Cross Hospital and specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.


 

Revealed: The most serious medical blunders made at Merseyside hospitals
Revealed: The most serious medical blunders made at Merseyside hospitals
Published 4th Jul 2016
Five patients were given the wrong surgery and another was given an insulin overdose

These are the potentially life-changing blunders made at Merseyside hospitals over the past 10 months.

They include five cases of patients being given the wrong operations and even a surgical object being left inside
someone after the surgery had ended.

There have been 11 ‘never events’ – so called because they should never happen – at Merseyside hospitals since
May last year, according to NHS England.

Every time a ‘never event’ occurs, it must be reported to the authorities and investigated to make sure similar
mistakes do no happen again.

'Never events' at Merseyside hospitals:

Five cases of 'wrong site surgery'

Two cases of drugs being administered by 'wrong route'

One overdose of insulin

One wrong implant or prosthesis

One 'foreign object' left inside body after surgery

Feeding tube wrongly inserted into patient's lungs

Dr Peter Williams, medical director of the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, said:
“We take ‘never events’ extremely seriously, we are open about them, we learn from them and we take action to
make further improvements in the care we provide to patients.”

A spokesman for Alder Hey said: “We take any incident extremely seriously and conduct a thorough investigation to
identify the cause of any incident, recommend key learnings and reduce the likelihood of similar incidents
happening in the future.”

Dianne Brown, director of nursing and midwifery at Liverpool Women’s Hospital, added: “The trust does not
experience many ‘never events’.

“However, when we do, the public can be assured that we investigate them thoroughly and try to learn as much from
them as we can so as to ensure they do not happen again.”

Source: liverpoolecho
 Senior NHS weight-loss surgeon struck off after six patients die in horrific circumstances
Senior NHS weight-loss surgeon struck off after six patients die in horrific circumstances
Published 4th Jul 2016
A leading weight-loss surgeon who also acted as an expert in cases of clinical negligence has been struck off
after committing a string of what's been described as "deplorable" mistakes in the care of his patients. Dugal
Heath, 59, a Fellow at the Royal College of Surgeons, was criticised by a medical tribunal for his clinical
performance relating to six patients who died in two years.

Grieving relatives said this week of their relief after hearing the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service's
(MPTS) decision to remove Heath from the medical register. The parents of one young mother who passed away said:
"It won't bring our daughter back and will never make it easier for our granddaughter, who has lost her mum, but
we're glad he was struck off. He won't be able to do it to anyone else."

Heath's errors – described in a MPTS hearing last month as "extraordinary" and doing "irremediable" damage –
included subjecting patients to the wrong procedures, accidentally damaging internal organs during surgery and
even accusing a patient who starved for months on end of making up her illness.

One individual who went in for a routine gastric bypass came out with a damaged liver, an injured colon and a
torn bowel due to Heath's "rough" handling and poor use of medical instruments. The patient died a week later.

Another died having suffered heavy internal bleeding while under Heath's knife, with the patient closed up and
left haemorrhaging in the hospital ward. A third effectively starved for months on end after a blockage in her
intestine was not found, and she was told by Heath that her symptoms were "psychological".

The Whittington NHS Hospital in north London – where Heath was employed as a senior consultant – this week
apologised to those affected by Heath's misconduct, saying it was "truly sorry". It now faces a string of
potentially costly legal cases, with relatives of Heath's former patients alleging a failure in the duty of care.

Source: ibtimes
Motorcyclist who lost job after suffering terrible injuries in accident receives compensation
Motorcyclist who lost job after suffering terrible injuries in accident receives compensation
Published 4th Jul 2016
The last thing Richard Wiltshire remembers is leaving Tesco at around 8pm with nappies for his grandchild.

The next moment he was coming around after five days in intensive care at Southmead Hospital, with no knowledge
of how he found himself there.

The 50-year-old later learnt that on his way home to Brislington on his motorbike a car had pulled out of a
driveway on Callington Road and attempted to do a u-turn.

As a result Richard, 50, was given no chance of avoiding the collision and he was thrown from his bike and
underneath the vehicle.

The impact had left him with fractures to his right arm, left leg and face, a bleed on his brain and lacerations
to his spleen.

"Everything I am telling you is what I have been told by other people because it's a complete blur for me."
Richard says of the accident in July last year.

"The last thing I remember is leaving Tesco. Luckily for me there were three independent witnesses but
frustratingly I don't know who they are. I would like to know because one woman stayed with me until the
ambulance came and I would love to say thank you."

Worried by his tardiness, his wife of 26 years, Paula, had driven the grandchildren to the scene to look for him,
before seeing the police roadblock and realising the awful truth.

Understandably officers were unable to tell her if Richard was dead or alive and she travelled to hospital in the
back of a police car sick to the stomach.

"In many ways it was far worse for my family because I had no idea what was going on,"

Thankfully he pulled through but his injuries meant that his job as a production engineer for GKN Aerospace was
no longer something he could continue and he took voluntary redundancy.

"I liked work, it was a good team and we all got on well," he said.

"It took me abroad and was a very satisfying job. It felt like you were part of a big family and that's what I
miss the most."

As a result of his injuries his "brilliant wife" Paula had to quit her part time job to look after Richard who
for the first four months out of hospital was bed-ridden and needed 24 hour care.

Richard has now been awarded compensation.

Source: bristolpost
Swab left in patient and wrong eye injected: Dozens of mistakes revealed at hospitals
Swab left in patient and wrong eye injected: Dozens of mistakes revealed at hospitals
Published 21st Jun 2016

These include 29 confidential breaches, 13 delays in diagnosis or treatment, five missed diagnoses and 20 unexpected deaths at the Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust between April 2015 and April 2016.

Meanwhile, the three 'never events' involved a swab left inside a patient, a patient who had their chest drained on the wrong side of their body and an opthalmology patient who had the wrong eye injected.

Information revealed in the trust's latest quality report showed there were 11 cases of C.Diff, nine cases of unspecified infection, six cases of sub optimal care, and three drug errors. Other incidents listed included three surgical errors, two cases of MRSA and two of failure to act.

There were single cases of a 12-hour breach, alleged child abuse, outpatient appointment delay, radiation, treatment given without consent, unexpected injury and venous thromoembolism.

There were also 278 reportable incidents, which included 238 pressure ulcers, seven of maternity and 33 slips, trips or falls. As of April this year, there were four investigations overdue.

The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust Chief Nursing Officer Cheryl Etches said that despite the figures, the majority of patients are satisfied with the care they receive, and attributed the errors which were recorded to human error and changes in systems or procedures.

She said: “The Trust treats all these incidents and never events very seriously. We are clear that never events should not happen at all.

“The report is evidence of the sound reporting culture that exists at RWT, where staff have the confidence to report matters which enable us to fully investigate why these things happen.

“They could be down to any one of a range of factors, such as human error or a need to change systems or procedures."

She added: "In all of the cases the patients and their families are fully informed and we share all outcomes with them.

“While we are clear that never events should not happen, we would reassure patients that in 2015/16 almost 200,000 specialist procedures were carried out at our hospitals and we welcomed 641,000 outpatient visits at hospitals and in the community.

Source: expressandstar

Chester-le-Street care home pays compensation to family after father's death
Chester-le-Street care home pays compensation to family after father's death
Published 21st Jun 2016

The son of a man who died after a short spell in a Chester-le-Street care home is calling for better care for the elderly.

John Blenkiron from Chester-Le-Street, who suffered from dementia and Parkinson’s disease, died aged 63 after his health deteriorated rapidly during a short stay at Lindisfarne Care Home in 2011.

The family have received an undisclosed financial settlement from the Gainford Care Homes Limited, the firm which runs the home, which was agreed just minutes before a civil hearing was due to begin.

Mr Blenkiron’s son John, from Stanley, said: “My Dad was supposed to go into the care home for two weeks to give my mam, who had injured her leg, some much-needed respite. Very quickly we realised that the care he was being provided with at the care home was not what we had expected and we were concerned that he was not being given the medication he needed, despite us explaining how important it was he was given it.

“We made the decision to take him out of the home and he was rushed to hospital the next day. He never returned to his former self and died in May 2011.”

The 63-year-old was suffering from a pressure sores on his back and heels he was taken to the University Hospital of North Durham the day after he returned home.

Gainford Care Homes Limited deny that the care Mr Blenkiron received at the home hastened his death, though lawyers have secured the family a settlement.

A spokesperson for the care company said they agreed the payment to avoid court costs.

 “We should wish to emphasise the fact that particular problems were caused for Mr Blenkiron directly by his family, as a result for example of his family failing to deliver his vitally important medication to the care home for several days after his admission; both the social worker and CQC are fully aware of this.”

Source: chroniclelive

Teen left disabled during childbirth wins payout from Liverpool Women's Hospital
Teen left disabled during childbirth wins payout from Liverpool Women's Hospital
Published 21st Jun 2016

A teenager won compensation from Liverpool Women’s Hospital after she was left disabled during childbirth.

Baby Courtney Webb’s shoulders became stuck half way through labour, but doctors went ahead with a natural birth instead of performing a Caesarean section.

The traumatic delivery left the infant with permanent nerve damage in her right shoulder.

Courtney, now 16, developed a condition called Erb’s palsy – causing reduced movement, grip and strength in her arm.

She has now been paid a “significant sum” by the NHS after the case went to court and a judge ruled doctors should have delivered by Caesarean.

Her mum Stacey Perkins, 37, said: “The problems we suffered at Liverpool Women’s Hospital were awful and we can’t help but feel the injury Courtney suffered could have easily been avoided.

 “I know the hospital had guidelines in place for the management of a delayed labour, but they didn’t apply the individual circumstances to the situation and, had they have done, we wouldn’t have had to go through all this and Courtney would not have suffered.

“It happened 16 years ago now but this kind of problem still happens today and I think it’s important for medical staff to look at every situation carefully and obtain appropriate guidance as necessary.”

Liverpool Women’s Hospital says it “regrets” the injuries Courtney suffered, but insists clinical care has improved massively since October 1999 when she was born.

Stacey continued: “As a result of her injuries, Courtney faces challenges every day but she is determined to overcome them and get on with her life.

“We are relieved to have secured a settlement from the trust for the injuries Courtney suffered.

“We now want to put our experience behind us and focus on getting Courtney the help and support she needs to continue overcoming the challenges she faces.”

It is known as shoulder dystocia when a baby’s shoulders become stuck during childbirth.

It happens in one in 150 natural births and is usually resolved without complications.

Source: Liverpoolecho

Revealed: The Liverpool doctor who could cost the NHS £25m
Revealed: The Liverpool doctor who could cost the NHS £25m
Published 14th Jun 2016

bungling Liverpool doctor could cost the NHS £25m after hundreds of patients won

compensation payouts.

 

The NHS has so far paid nearly £12m to more than 200 women who were treated by Dr

George Rowland.

 

Health chiefs have also forked out £5.4m in legal costs.

 

And the total bill for Dr Rowland’s mistakes could be as much as £25m.

 

The uro-gynaecologist bungled hundreds of operations while working mainly at Aintree

Centre for Women’s Health, now run by Liverpool Women’s Hospital, between the mid

1990s and 2007.

 

The patients all claimed they were given the wrong surgery to treat incontinence, had it

performed badly or were not given proper after-care.

 

Many of the women suffered “life-changing injuries”, according to the lawyer who

represented the majority of them.

 

There were 406 patients who filed for compensation – 239 won payouts, 136 cases were

discontinued and 31 have still not been settled.

 

Dr Rowland surrendered his medical licence in 2013 and never faced a full misconduct

hearing.

 

But the medic, who qualified from Edinburgh University in 1976, had strict conditions

imposed on him from 2008.

 

These included limits on the medical procedures he was allowed to carry out.

 

Vanessa Harris, director of finance at Liverpool Women’s Hospital, said: “Over a number of

years, as claims have been settled, the estimate has become more robust and the amount

has reduced.

 

“The current estimate for the total claim, including claims paid and those still to be settled,

amounts to £25m.”

 

Source: liverpoolecho

Family of grandmother who died after notes mix up speak of their traumatic ordeal
Family of grandmother who died after notes mix up speak of their traumatic ordeal
Published 14th Jun 2016

The family of a woman who died after her medical notes were mixed up with another

patient’s have spoken of their anguish.

 

Jean Hill, 66, died amid confusion over whether to resuscitate her as her traumatised

husband and daughters watched from a nurses’ station.

 

Her family watched in horror as medical staff debated whether to try and save her life. They

have spent two years trying to get answers about the way she was treated at North

Manchester General but hospital bosses have now apologised admitting her care was ‘far

from ideal.’

 

The grandmother-of-two was admitted to North Manchester General with a kidney

condition and found to have a fast and irregular heartbeat, but there was no suggestion her

condition was life-threatening so her family left her for the night having been reassured she

was fine.

 

“We said goodbye and everything seemed normal,” said her husband Malcolm.

 

Shortly after 4am the next morning, Malcolm received a call from hospital staff saying Jean

had taken a turn for the worse.

 

When Malcolm and his two daughters, Wendy Scallan and Tracey Msahli arrived, they were

told Jean had stopped breathing.

 

Wendy, 46, said: “They took us into a room and said mum had been resuscitated, and they’d

had to use a bag to keep her breathing.

 

“They said if it happened again they’d taken the medical decision not to resuscitate her.

They said they couldn’t have someone bagging her all day.

 

“We said if we have to take it in turns with the bag, we would do. We just didn’t want them

to give up on her.

 

“Then the doctor said they wouldn’t be giving her dialysis - even though my mum had never

had dialysis.”

 

It turned out medical staff were looking at the notes of a different Jean Hill, who was 20

years older and being treated at a different hospital.

 

“My sister almost jokingly asked whether they were talking about the right person,” said

Wendy.

 

“She looked at the address and it became clear they weren’t mum’s notes. We sat there in

utter disbelief.”

 

Around 15 minutes later, Jean’s condition took a dramatic turn for the worse and the family

were told she was taking her last breaths.

 

When they rushed to her bedside, all of the monitors had been turned off.

 

A chaotic scene unfolded as medics debated whether to resuscitate Jean.

 

Wendy said: “So much happened in such a short space of time.

 

“There was a lot of confusion over whether they should resuscitate her. One doctor said no

and the nurses were saying yes.

 

“We stood there shell shocked as the crash team worked on my mum.”

 

Doctors tried to revive Jean for 45 minutes but she couldn’t be saved. She died at 8am on

January 7, 2014.

 

Malcolm and his daughters have been fighting for answers ever since.

 

Bosses at Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, who run North Manchester General, have

apologised to the Hill family for the mix up with the notes. A spokesman for the trust said:

“We fully accept the Coroner’s conclusion following the sad death of Mrs Hill.

 

“Whilst we believe that appropriate care was afforded to Mrs Hill, and this was supported

by the Coroner’s independent expert physician, it is unacceptable that letters relating to

another patient were in Mrs Hill’s medical records and that this was not identified at the

very earliest opportunity. For this, we are truly sorry.

 

“We have previously apologised to Mrs Hill’s family for this and wish to reiterate that

apology.”

 

Source: manchestereveningnews

 

Wife died of cardiac arrest after NHS diagnosis blunder
Wife died of cardiac arrest after NHS diagnosis blunder
Published 14th Jun 2016

Brian Kinsey and his wife Ann who collapsed while her husband was out buying antacids, as

advised by a non-emergency telephone line

 

Ann Kinsey was found unconscious at her Wolverhampton home by husband Brian when he

returned from going out to buy her antacids – as advised by the non-emergency 0845 46 47

telephone line.

 

He has now been awarded an undisclosed settlement after the NHS Direct Trust admitted

68-year-old Ann had been incorrectly diagnosed.

 

Mr Kinsey called 999 for an ambulance and when paramedics arrived they worked to

resuscitate Ann for an hour before taking her to New Cross Hospital, where they spent a

further 30 minutes trying to save her.

 

He said: “Nothing can bring Ann back, I miss her every day. But it was very important NHS

Direct acknowledged its mistakes. Ann loved life. She worked at Waitrose well past her

retirement age because she just loved to be around people.

 

“We did dream of one day moving closer to our daughter and grandchildren in Surrey –

something I have now had to do alone.”

 

The trust admitted a breach of duty in failing to provide the correct advice and treatment for

Ann but has denied that this would have prevented her death.

 

Ann was feeling unwell when she returned home from her job as a checkout supervisor at

Waitrose at 5pm on December 28, 2011. Within minutes she was complaining of chest pains.

 

Brian called the non-emergency line but no ambulance was dispatched by the call handler.

He then received a call back from an out-of-hours GP, who said Ann seemed to be suffering

from gastroenteritis or acid reflux. He was advised she take antacids and paracetamol for

pain relief. But when Mr Kinsey returned from the shop he found his wife unresponsive.

 

Brian added: “If an ambulance had been dispatched that night at least she would stood a

chance of living.”

 

Source: expressandstar

M5 Southbound closed after fatal accident
M5 Southbound closed after fatal accident
Published 2nd Jun 2016

The M5 Southbound is currently closed due to accident investigation work between J8 and J9 (Tewkesbury).

It's after a serious accident that happened at around 01:30 this morning involving a lorry and two cars.

A diversion is in place with drivers being brought off at J8 and directed to the M50 Westbound and the A417 Southbound towards Gloucester.

Man died at Queen Elizabeth Hospital after staff failed to treat him properly
Man died at Queen Elizabeth Hospital after staff failed to treat him properly
Published 1st Jun 2016

The devastated family of a man, who died because staff at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Woolwich failed to treat him properly, has received a settlement of over £4 million.

The seven-figure payout has been approved by the High Court of Justice after the South London Healthcare Trust, which was responsible for his care, admitted liability for his death.

The South London Healthcare Trust was dissolved in October 2013 when the running of the hospital was taken over by the Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust.

In 2011, a previously healthy 34-year-old man, who cannot be named for legal reasons, collapsed following a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain and nausea.

He was taken to QE hospital by ambulance where he was diagnosed with pancreatitis, but staff failed to give him adequate treatment, including fluids and analgesia.

After staff failed to monitor his condition correctly he experienced periods of hypovolaemia, a shock condition that means the heart is unable to pump sufficient blood around the body.

Concerned about his deteriorating condition, his family attempted to transfer him to a private hospital but this was delayed by the staff.

By the time he was transferred to the Princess Royal Hospital, received fluids and was provided with appropriate treatment, it was too late and, despite the efforts of the staff at the PRUH and St Thomas’ Hospital where he was subsequently transferred to, he died on February 9, 2011.

A spokeswoman for Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust, which is now responsible for the QE Hospital, said: "Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust is pleased that a settlement has been reached and approved by the Court. 

"There was a full admission of liability provided in the claim and the family received an apology from SLHT."

Source: thisislocallondon

Schoolboy who died from undiagnosed disease 'could have survived if he had been treated just hours before his death'
Schoolboy who died from undiagnosed disease 'could have survived if he had been treated just hours before his death'
Published 1st Jun 2016

Professor Ieuan Hughes told the trial of two GPs accused of the manslaughter of Ryan Morse he was confident the 12-year-old would have lived had he been treated

Schoolboy Ryan Morse, who died from undiagnosed Addison’s disease, could have survived if he had been admitted to hospital and given treatment, an expert witness said.

Consultant paediatrician Professor Ieuan Hughes told Cardiff Crown Court , where two GPs are on trial for manslaughter, that right up until the end of his life the 12-year-old, who lived with his family in Abertillery, would have been expected to respond with the correct intervention.

“I have confidence that if he had been taken to Neville Hall Hospital my colleagues there would have had the experience and the know-how to resuscitate this child, would probably have made a diagnosis quickly and would have gone ahead and given the appropriate treatment,” he said.

The court heard how Ryan’s mother was concerned for months about his general health, his loss of weight, and his skin appearing to darken, and had taken him to the doctors.

Carol Morse told the jury that other school children started calling him Teabag and said she had brought up the issue of his skin as well as other matters relating to her previously “fit and healthy” son at Abernant Surgery in Abertillery.

He died at the end of 2012, five months after his first visit there.

Source: walesonline

Error at Queen Alexandra Hospital hampers woman’s chances of having children
Error at Queen Alexandra Hospital hampers woman’s chances of having children
Published 1st Jun 2016

Nanny Katie Pack loves children and has always wanted to start her own family.

But doctors at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Portsmouth failed to spot appendicitis quick enough, which led to her appendix bursting, when she was 19.

This may have caused damage to Katie’s fallopian tube and ovary, meaning she might struggle to conceive children naturally.

Now Katie has been paid a five-figure sum for the pain and distress caused, as well as payment towards future courses of IVF.

The 23-year-old, of Boldens Road, Gosport, said: ‘I hope this outcome will mean that no-one else goes through the suffering I experienced after what should have been an easily treated medical issue.

‘It’s taken me a long time to recover, and while the settlement doesn’t reverse the damage done, it does at least help me get my life back on track.

A series of misdiagnoses over a period of 17 days led to her appendix bursting, causing significant bowel damage, in December 2011.

This then required an emergency drain to be inserted to remove the resulting abscesses before doctors could finally perform an appendectomy – almost two months later.

Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, which runs QA, admitted liability.

A trust spokesman said: ‘The trust confirms liability was admitted in respect of Miss Pack’s treatment.

‘A formal written apology was made by the chief executive and a financial settlement reached.’

Source: portsmouth


Hospital bosses say sorry for poor care after cancer sufferer dies following treatment delays
Hospital bosses say sorry for poor care after cancer sufferer dies following treatment delays
Published 26th May 2016

Hospital bosses have admitted a catalogue of poor care which meant that a cancer patient died from a heart attack after delays in treatment.

Sharon Ignatowics' family has been fighting a three-year battle for justice for their mother who was 54 when she died on April 2, 2013.

They have just received an undisclosed compensation pay out from Leicester's hospitals.

Medical director Andrew Furlong said: "We would like to offer our sincere apologies to the family of Mrs Ignatowics for their loss and the distress that this process has caused."

Mrs Ignatowics, from Braunstone, was diagnosed with the blood cancer multiple myeloma in 2009.

In February 2013 she was admitted to Leicester Royal Infirmary suffering pneumonia but discharged on March 29.

Two days later she had to be re-admitted after becoming unwell.

After a long wait for a bed there was a 2hr 45 min delay in the medical admission process.

There were further delays in taking blood samples and no action was taken when the test result at 4am showed Mrs Ignatowics was hyperkalaemia (high potassium level).

She was found dead at 5.30am having suffered a cardiac arrest.

Mr Furlong added: "Mrs Ignatowics was in the end stages of her chronic malignant cancer and we had exhausted all treatment options available.

"However, when she was admitted in April 2013 we missed opportunities that would have allowed Mrs Ignatowics treatment which may have extended her life, or allowed her to die surrounded by her family.

"For that we remain truly sorry."

Source:  leicestermercury 

Mum who lost leg after series of errors from surgeon wins health board apology and payout
Mum who lost leg after series of errors from surgeon wins health board apology and payout
Published 26th May 2016

A health board has since apologised to a mum who needed her left leg amputated following a series of errors by her surgeon.

Pauline Wilson was given an undisclosed payout by Cardiff and Vale University Health Board in February after they admitted liability for clinical negligence.

The 52-year-old, who was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, a condition where the colon and rectum become inflamed, underwent a colectomy in 2006 when her condition failed to respond to treatment.

After making good progress, she needed a further operation to remove her rectum and colon in August 2008.

But errors made by her surgeon during this operation at University Hospital Llandough severely hampered her long-term health and mobility, resulting in Mrs Wilson’s leg being amputated below the knee in 2014.

The health board has since apologised to Mrs Wilson and her family.

A spokesman for Cardiff and Vale University Health Board said it was not able to discuss the details of “confidential patient care” but added: “In this instance the health board has clearly failed and for that we sincerely apologise to Mrs Wilson and her family. The health board accepted liability early in this case and has made a financial settlement.”

Source: mirror

Woman suffers suspected spinal injuries in West Bromwich smash
Woman suffers suspected spinal injuries in West Bromwich smash
Published 26th May 2016

A woman was taken to hospital with suspected spinal injuries after a car and a van crashed in West Bromwich this afternoon.

Firefighters had to cut the woman free from her car after it collided with the transit van along Newton Road.

Emergency services were called to the scene at around 1pm.

The woman was taken taken to Sandwell Hospital with suspected spinal injuries after being freed by fire crews.

Police and ambulance crews also attended the crash.

West Midlands Fire Service spokesman Matthew Smith said: “We received a call from the ambulance service at 1.04pm and the stop message came through at 1.44pm.

“The incident involved one car and a transit van in a collision. One female was extricated from the car using cutting equipment.”

Source: expressandstar

Relief for Stourbridge family as seven-figure hospital payout awarded to disabled Alfie Johnson
Relief for Stourbridge family as seven-figure hospital payout awarded to disabled Alfie Johnson
Published 23rd May 2016

The family of Stourbridge youngster Alfie Johnson have spoken of their relief at receiving a seven-figure payout - eight years after complications at birth left him with severe brain damage.

Alfie, aged eight, will have the specialist care he needs for the rest of his life thanks to the compensation settlement which marks the end of a long legal battle.

The payout, approved by London's High Court, will cover the cost of the specialist accommodation, equipment, care and therapy he requires to cope with his extensive disabilities which resulted from being starved of oxygen when he was born at Russells Hall Hospital, Dudley.

The hospital trust admitted in 2011 there had been failings by midwives to monitor Alfie and his mother Vickie during labour which meant signs he was in distress were missed - and Dudley Group bosses apologised to the youngster and his family.

But it has taken a further five years of assessments and negotiations to reach a conclusion on a compensation package that will give him life-long security.

Alfie’s dad Paul Johnson said: “It’s a relief to get to this point and it means Alfie’s needs will be met for the rest of his life.

Despite the family's devastation over Alfie's traumatic birth and the disabilities he's been left with - the Johnsons have managed to turn their heartbreak into hope and a charity set up to help buy equipment for Alfie is now helping other families battling for better lives for their disabled children.

The Friends of Alfie Johnson, set up by Paul, his sister, brother, brother-in-law and loyal friends, holds a variety of fundraising events each year and has raised more than £100,000 and helped many children with disabilities like Alfie.

Source: stourbridgenews

Compensation win for businessman who suffered horrific brain damage falling down stairs at city centre bar
Compensation win for businessman who suffered horrific brain damage falling down stairs at city centre bar
Published 23rd May 2016

A businessman who suffered horrific brain damage when he tumbled down stairs at a bar in Manchester city centre has successfully sued them for compensation.

The man was enjoying a night out with former work colleagues when tragedy struck at Pulse Bar, in Dantzic Street, in June 2011.

He was leaving the first floor area after drinking six or seven pints when he fell headlong down a flight of stairs leading to the street outside.

The man, in his 50s, fractured his skull and suffered brain damage so severe he is now incapable of looking after himself.

London’s High Court heard he is so vulnerable that Judge Richard Pearce ordered he must not be identified in reports of the case.

Lawyers on his behalf sued the bar’s owners, Pro-Nation Ltd - who the judge found 100 percent liable to compensate the man for his injuries.

Although the amount of his payout has yet to be assessed, he will need care and support for the rest of his life and the award may well run into millions.

Source: manchestereveningnews

th - the Johnsons have managed to turn their heartbreak into hope and a charity set up to help buy equipment for Alfie is now helping other families battling for better lives for their disabled children.

 

The Friends of Alfie Johnson, set up by Paul, his sister, brother, brother-in-law and loyal friends, holds a variety of fundraising events each year and has raised more than £100,000 and helped many children with disabilities like Alfie.

Source: stourbridgenews

Family win seven-figure payout after bitter eight-year court battle over hospital blunder which left their son with cerebral palsy
Family win seven-figure payout after bitter eight-year court battle over hospital blunder which left their son with cerebral palsy
Published 18th May 2016
A family who fought a bitter eight-year court battle after a hospital blunder left their son with severe cerebral
palsy has been awarded a seven-figure payout.

Alfie Johnson, eight, came within 30 seconds of death when he was starved of oxygen during birth after midwives
failed to monitor his heart rate.

He was diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) brain damage six weeks later at Russells Hall
Hospital in Dudley, West Midlands, in December 2007.

Paul and his wife Vickie, 43, of Stourbridge, West Midlands, started legal action in March 2008 and Dudley Group
of Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust admitted liability in August 2011.

After eight years of prosecution and defence experts testing Alfie, the family were finally awarded an
undisclosed seven-figure payout at the High Court in London on Thursday.

Father-of-three Mr Johnson said: 'This money allows us to focus on Alfie and not worry about money - to try and
make up for all of the things he's missed.

'The last eight years have been a nightmare, but this is a new chapter now.

'We're going to use the money to get an extension and get Alfie a spa pool. He loves to play about in water, but
it's difficult to get him access to it.

'Alfie is fine in himself, but he can't walk, he can't talk, he can't see or hold his head up.

'He can hear fine though, and he giggles with his brother, Finley, and our dogs.

'We also set up a charity with our family and friends to raise money for Alfie, called Friends of Alfie Johnson.

'Now we've got this money, the charity is going to be used to offer help to other parents going through the same
thing.'

The Johnsons's payout was calculated on Alfie's life expectancy, and astonishingly they would have been offered
more if he was less ill.

Tragically, the eight year old is only expected to live until he is 30 because his cerebral palsy is so severe.

Mr Johnson, who is a full-time carer for Alfie, along with wife Vickie, said: 'It's a horrible thought that I
might be burying my son when he is 30.

'I should be a granddad to his children then, and he should have a business. He could live longer, but he could
also live less long.

'We try not to dwell on it though, just enjoy our time with him.'

Source: dailymail
Derby pensioner was awarded £50,000 compensation after breaking hip in Asda Sinfin
Derby pensioner was awarded £50,000 compensation after breaking hip in Asda Sinfin
Published 18th May 2016
An elderly Derby woman was awarded £50,000 compensation after falling and breaking her hip in an Asda store.

The woman was left unable to leave the house on her own and died two years ago.

The 79-year-old fell over a 2ft high post while looking at clocks in the Sinfin store and she woke up on the
floor.

Her daughter, 58, who also did not want to be named, said she spent three to four hours caring for her mum every
day for the first five months after the accident.

She said: "Before the accident my mother was completely independent. I did not have to provide her with any care
and assistance. I often visited my mother for a cup of tea but I never had to help her with anything. Whilst she
did suffer with diabetes and was not in perfect health, her medical conditions were well controlled and she was
completely able to look after herself doing her own shopping, domestic chores etc.

"Immediately following the accident my mother was unable to do anything without some form of assistance. She was
able to move a little but needed help from me and walking aides to get around the house and up the stairs. I now
clean her house for her as she is unable to move well enough to do this and she does not have full movement in
her hip. I spend approximately 2-3 hours a week cleaning for her."

Source: derbytelegraph
'Terrible mistake' by doctor at Wythenshawe Hospital led to death of baby girl
'Terrible mistake' by doctor at Wythenshawe Hospital led to death of baby girl
Published 18th May 2016
The 'terrible mistake’ of an experienced doctor led to the death of a baby girl during a C-section delivery, an
inquest has heard.

The operation at Wythenshawe Hospital went wrong after a medic made an incision ‘too high’ in the uterus.

It meant baby Thea Rose Morgan could not be delivered for nine minutes - a crucial period in which she suffered
severe oxygen deprivation.

She also suffered head trauma and bleeding as doctors tried to lift her head - and doctors could then not
resuscitate her for more than 30 minutes.

She died four days later.

Coroner Ms Sally Hatfield ruled that the misplaced incision slowed down delivery and resulted in Thea’s death.

Summing up and in reference to the C-section error, coroner Ms Hatfield said: “This was just a terrible mistake
made by Dr Loveridge.”

She said the medic had not made the error ‘before or since’ and described her distress over the incident, which
had affected her practice since.

Ms Hatfield expressed admiration for both Thea’s parents and the staff who had remained throughout the inquest.

She said the hospital trust had learned from the case and applied changes with ‘dedication’.

There were also ‘communication issues’ between midwives and medics in the lead-up to the operation, the inquest
heard.

The cause of death was recorded as oxygen deprivation, head trauma, haemorrhage, and skull fracture due to
complications of caesarean section delivery.

Dr John Crampton, medical director at University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, said: “The
Trust accepts the Coroner’s conclusion.

"The Trust has made a number of changes to address issues identified including the development of a specific
training course to improve clinical communication, increased training around complex deliveries and enhancing the
training and equipment for neonatal resuscitations.

"We will continue to ensure these measures are effective and sustained.”

Source: manchestereveningnews
Heartbroken lady slams suspended sentences for carers who failed her vulnerable brother
Heartbroken lady slams suspended sentences for carers who failed her vulnerable brother
Published 10th May 2016

The heartbroken sister of a vulnerable Wordsley man who choked and died while being looked after by carers has condemned the decision to let them walk free.

Andrew Strazdins, aged 52, was given chicken bites to eat in the back of a car by Barbara Arch and Wendy Silvester, knowing he could only swallow mashed food.

They were taking him on a break to Cornwall when he choked on the food and his distraught sister, Elaine Scott, from Halesowen, said he and other vulnerable people had been let down by their sentence.

She said: “They killed him. They knew the danger of feeding Andrew solid food but took the risk. Now my brother is dead and they have walked free.”

Arch, aged 58, of Smallshire Way, Wordsley, and Silvester, aged 50, of Newland Court, Birmingham, admitted failing to discharge their duties as carers and were handed six-month jail terms, suspended for 12 months, at Exeter Crown Court last week.

But Mrs Scott, aged 57, said: "We do not treat vulnerable adults the same as we do children - they are very much second class citizens. My brother had a mental age of three. If the same had happened to a child there would have been outrage and they would have gone to prison."

A spokesman for Lifeways said: “Following Andrew’s death almost two years ago, we have been searching for answers as to what happened on that fateful journey. The court has heard the facts and his two carers have admitted that, despite all the procedures and processes that were in place, their actions fell short that day.

“Our thoughts go out to Andrew’s family and to all who knew him and we will continue to learn lessons to ensure something like this never happens again. The safety of our service users remains our number one priority.”

Source: stourbridgenews

Carers sacked after negligence contributes to death of Tilehurst man
Carers sacked after negligence contributes to death of Tilehurst man
Published 10th May 2016

Carers who failed to act when the 61-year-old man they were looking after choked to death on a cupcake in Tilehurst have been sacked following an internal investigation.

When Colin Reeves was choking at The Village Coffee Shop in December 2013 his Choice Care Group carers Nyasha Chivige and Esmeralda De Pina phoned their manager instead of calling an ambulance and attempting to dislodge the food.

They missed a 10-minute window to react and save Mr Reeves' life. The man was living at Boxgrove House care home in Tilehurst at the time and he was known to have serious learning difficulties and be at high risk of choking.

After the incident both carers said they did not have adequate training to respond and Miss De Pina admitted she "didn't realise it was a medical emergency".

At an inquest in Reading on Wednesday, April 27 coroner Peter Bedford recorded a verdict of accidental death but said the neglect by Mr Reeves' carers contributed to his death.

The inquest also heard how staff were trained in first aid so they could have responded effectively and coroner Peter Bedford said: "It seems to me for someone in a position of care it was obvious something needed to be done."

In a statement Choice Care Group said: "Choice Care Group takes the welfare and safety of the people we support very seriously and we were deeply sorry for the loss of Colin whilst he was in our care.

"We ensure that all staff are carefully trained to meet the needs of the individuals in our services so as to keep them protected from harm.

"The staff involved in this incident were suitably trained at the time of the incident"

"The staff involved in this incident were suitably trained at the time of the incident which occurred in December 2013.

"Following this incident we undertook a thorough investigation which resulted in the dismissal of the staff involved.

"They were also referred by us to the Disclosure and Barring list, as given their failure to follow their training and the care plan for the person, we did not consider them suitable to work in the field of care any longer."

"We made some changes in the way we induct and train our staff"

"We also reflected on what more we could do as an organisation, and we made some changes in the way we induct and train our staff to reinforce even further the high standards expected of them when dealing with people in their care."

The duo had phoned manager Judith Fyrogenis who arrived at the cafe, in The Triangle, with 90 seconds left of the 10-minute window, which Mr Bedford did not feel was enough time for her to act.

The manager phoned for an ambulance and CPR was done, but it was thought to have been started too late to save the man's life.

Source: getreading

Family of gran who died after her medical notes were mixed up with another patient’s tell of their grief
Family of gran who died after her medical notes were mixed up with another patient’s tell of their grief
Published 27th Apr 2016
Jean Hill, 66, died amid confusion over whether to resuscitate her after her notes were mixed up with those of
another patient of the same name.

The family of a grandmother who died after hospital staff mixed up her medical notes with another patient's have
told of their grief.

Jean Hill, 66, stopped breathing after being admitted to North Manchester General Hospital in January 2014 with a
kidney condition.

However, there was confusion over whether to resuscitate her after her notes were mixed up with those of another
woman of the same name.

Her husband and daughters watched in horror from a nurses’ station as medical staff debated whether to try and
save their loved one's life.

The family has spent two years trying to get answers about the way Jean was treated at the hospital, the
Manchester Evening News reports.

But bosses at the facility have now apologised, admitting her care was 'far from ideal'.

“Despite a reluctance by The Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust to provide details on the mix up of medical
notes, its clear from expert witnesses that the care that Mrs Hill received was “far from ideal” and that the
severity of her illness was under-appreciated.

“We fought the Trust for a long time to get them to provide more details on the care that Jean received, and it
was gratifying that they finally apologised to the family as a result.”

Source: mirror
Woman who lost baby following traumatic delivery claims doctors refused her caesarean 'to save costs'
Woman who lost baby following traumatic delivery claims doctors refused her caesarean 'to save costs'
Published 27th Apr 2016
A mother who lost her baby five days after giving birth claims doctors ignored her demands for a caesarean.

Tracey Taylor says she was treated by health professionals at North Middlesex University Hospital, in London, as
an "over-anxious woman."

She lost her baby boy Kristian Jaworski after a traumatic delivery which made it difficult for the new born to
receive enough oxygen.

In a strongly-worded report to the Department of Health, senior coroner Andrew Walker warned "there is a risk
that future deaths will occur unless action is taken".

He said there was a "presumption in favour of vaginal delivery based partly of cost" although the hospital denies
this was the case.

Natural deliveries are cheaper for the NHS than caesareans.

North Middlesex University Hospital's director of medicine, Dr Cathy Cale, said cost was not a factor in deciding
to press ahead with a vaginal delivery.

She said: "We are very sorry for the tragic death of baby Kristian. The team of doctors and midwives were deeply
affected and both they and the hospital trust have expressed sincere apologies to the family.

"Although the coroner did not find the trust negligent, we have accepted liability for Kristian's death because
we accept we made mistakes.

Official NHS figures show that vaginal deliveries cost the health service £1,985 each.

Source: mirror
Boy wins £3k Sainsbury's payout after being scalded with soup then refused cold water to treat burn
Boy wins £3k Sainsbury's payout after being scalded with soup then refused cold water to treat burn
Published 27th Apr 2016
An autistic schoolboy has been awarded nearly £3,000 after he was scalded with hot soup in a Sainsbury's
supermarket - then refused cold water to treat his burn.

Bruce Wood, 13, was dining in the supermarket's cafe with his mother Marina, 38, and five-year-old brother
Francis, when a waiter accidentally spilled tomato soup over him.

The liquid burned the right side of his body but as he rushed to the toilets to douse himself with cold water,
the water came out warm.

Furious Marina tried to get behind the counter to use their taps but staff refused - on the grounds of health and
safety.

She claims it took a further 20 minutes before a member of staff trained in first aid arrived on the scene to
help Bruce.

Marina, who is Bruce's registered carer, said: "The fact the soup was spilt over Bruce was obviously traumatic
but the wait for cold water made it so much worse.

"It was no good us going into the toilets as the taps were mixed taps so the water wouldn't have been cold enough
and warm water could've melted his skin.

"They wouldn't let me go behind the till to use the cold water as they said it would've breached health and
safety policies.

"I was furious and kept demanding to go behind there or for a member of staff to bring some cold water to me, but
they said they couldn't do anything until a first aider was on the scene.

"I'd say it took a good 20 minutes for a member of staff trained in first aid to arrive. It felt like forever."

Bruce suffered the burns on October 9, 2014, in the restaurant at Sainsbury's Ely store in Cambridgeshire.

Marina decided to take legal action after Bruce struggled psychologically afterwards, and Sainsbury's agreed to
award the family £2,750 compensation.

No dispute was ever made by the supermarket over the damages, but a judge at Cambridge County Court was required
to formally order the compensation be paid due to Bruce's age.

Source: mirror
Grandmother awarded £37k in compensation after doctors misdiagnosed cancer as IBS
Grandmother awarded £37k in compensation after doctors misdiagnosed cancer as IBS
Published 25th Apr 2016
A grandmother has been awarded thousands of pounds in compensation after bungling doctors misdiagnosed her
ovarian cancer - as irritable bowel syndrome.

Beverley Scott, 53, was repeatedly told she had the treatable condition for 18 months despite begging medics for
a second opinion.

Shockingly, when doctors finally correctly diagnosed her with ovarian cancer it was too late to operate and she
has now been given a maximum of two years to live.

After taking legal action against the NHS, she has now received a £37,500 out-of-court settlement.

Mrs Scott, who used to work as an estate agent, said: "I am so angry it's unbelievable.

"l've been left to die. I feel let down. I'm the one now suffering and the suffering is unbearable.

"I have gone from a girl who was a sales negotiator, full of life, very flamboyant and arty to someone who lives
week to week not knowing the outcome.

"I am not living a life me anymore, I am living an existence.

"It is life-limiting which means they don't quite know how long I've got.

"There is no more they can do, they can't shrink the cancer and it doesn't respond to chemotherapy.

"To me I've now got terminal cancer. It's like being on death row.

"I can just about plan what I am doing next week but I can't plan next year, I can't even plan this Christmas."

Mrs Scott took legal action against George Eliot Hospitals NHS Trust and was due to attend a court case in
Birmingham in August this year.

But NHS bosses have now admitted responsibility and apologised to Mrs Scott who will received a £37,500 out-of-
court settlement.

The NHS Trust admitted it would have been reasonable to achieve an earlier cancer diagnosis and not doing so was
a "breach of duty" in Mrs Scott's care.

In a statement George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust apologised to Mrs Scott for the "unnecessary pain and suffering"
caused by their delay.

Chief executive Kath Kelly said: "On behalf of the trust l would like to convey my sincere apologies for the
failure to diagnose Mrs Scott's cancer sooner.

"The trust expresses its apologies to Mrs Scott for the unnecessary pain and suffering she experienced due to
this delay."

Source: express
Brain-damaged girl awarded nearly £8m for hospital negligence
Brain-damaged girl awarded nearly £8m for hospital negligence
Published 25th Apr 2016
A teenager has been awarded damages and compensation of nearly £8m after she was left brain-damaged at birth.

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust admitted the failings in her care shortly after her birth.

The girl, known as X during legal proceedings, is now dependent on others for daily activities.

The trust, which admitted liability, said it offered its "profound apologies" to the teenager.

The girl was born by Caesarean section due to concerns she was not growing in the womb.

Following her birth she was admitted to Worcestershire Royal Hospital's neonatal intensive care unit.

But her health deteriorated with symptoms caused by a bowel obstruction which had not been diagnosed.

In a statement, the trust said: "The Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust has accepted liability for
shortcomings in the care and treatment shortly after birth and expresses its profound apologies to the individual
and their family.

"The Honourable Mr Justice Stewart has approved a figure of damages to be awarded and the trust are pleased that
this legal claim has now been resolved and that damages have been agreed to ensure that the future is provided
for."

Source: BBC
Mum Emma Robinson may never walk again after Medway and Maidstone hospitals misdiagnose shattered disc in back
Mum Emma Robinson may never walk again after Medway and Maidstone hospitals misdiagnose shattered disc in back
Published 21st Apr 2016
A mother-of-two has been warned she may never walk again after two hospitals failed to correctly identify a
shattered disc in her back.

Two hospitals failed to correctly identify a shattered disc in Emma Robinson’s back, meaning she is now in a
wheelchair and has to have morphine every 10 minutes to control the pain.

She has been told there is no guarantee she will regain the feeling in her lower body.

The 27-year-old’s friends are raising money to help keep her and her boys, aged eight and four, together as the
rehabilitation threatens to separate them for weeks on end.

She fell down the stairs in her home on March 15, taking over-the-counter pain relief, before a physio found her
spine was out of alignment and she was sent to Medway Maritime Hospital with a letter requesting an MRI.

But the scan was not carried out; instead they did an X-ray, and sent her home to rest.

Increasing pain led her to seek a second opinion at Maidstone Hospital – where she was told she had a broken
coccyx, and nothing could be done.

Despite taking pain relief, Emma felt tingling and numbness in one of her legs and had to concentrate hard simply
to go to the toilet.

GPs also told her there was nothing to worry about and sent her home to master “pain management”, instructing her
to walk more and telling her she was fit to drive.

On April 7, Emma sought help again but at this GP appointment, an internal examination left her unable to walk
and she was taken by ambulance to Medway hospital where an MRI revealed no broken coccyx.

When doctors tried, once again, to send her home, Emma’s friend, Charlotte Hayes, insisted she stick around for a
second opinion which resulted in her being rushed to King’s College Hospital in London for emergency surgery.

Friend Ellen Green said: “How on earth could she have been have been misdiagnosed so many times after presenting
herself to various different health professionals?”

Within two weeks Emma had undergone a discectomy and a laminectomy – also known as decompression surgery – which
has completely taken away the compression of the nerves but left her unable to feel her legs.

Doctors are unable to say whether she will recover feeling.

Ellen says friends and family are fully supportive of her pursuing a case for medical negligence.

“She was told that being misdiagnosed for so long is why she had such bad nerve damage,” she said.

“She has been pushed from pillar to post and it’s not good enough. She used to be so independent and active –
she’s just get up and say ‘right, we’re going’.”

Source: kentonline

 Woman, 23, and teenager dead after BMW collides with group walking to cool off in river
Woman, 23, and teenager dead after BMW collides with group walking to cool off in river
Published 21st Apr 2016
A third teenager girl, 15, is in hospital with serious injuries including a broken leg and arm, Lancashire Police
said

Two people have died and a third is injured after a BMW collided with a group of women crossing a road to cool
off in a nearby river.

The collision happened at about 6.40pm last night when the group of five were walking down Brockholes Brow in
Preston, Lancashire.

It is understood they were on their way to relax at the River Ribble on the other side of the road.

As the group crossed the road three of them were struck by a BMW travelling towards the city centre.

A 23-year-old woman was sadly pronounced dead at the scene.

A 17-year-old girl was taken by ambulance to the Royal Preston Hospital where she was pronounced dead a short
time later.

A 15-year-old girl was taken to the Royal Preston Hospital and then transferred to the Manchester Children’s
Hospital suffering from a possible broken leg and arm.

The driver of the BMW, a 21-year-old man from Preston, was not injured but was treated for shock.

The road was closed for three and a half hours for accident investigation.

Sgt James Power, of the Road Policing Unit, said: "Two young people have tragically lost their lives in this
collision and their families are being supported at this time by specially trained officers.

Source: mirror
 Family win pay-out following dad's death when paramedics failed to take him to hospital
Family win pay-out following dad's death when paramedics failed to take him to hospital
Published 21st Apr 2016
The family of a heart attack victim have won a six-figure pay-out from East Midlands Ambulance Service after
paramedics failed to take him to hospital.

Emas officials have also apologised after a judge in a county court hearing concluded father-of-five Ahmed
Hussain would have survived if he had been taken to hospital.

Mr Hussain, 49, started to suffer chest pains, difficulty breathing and pain down his left arm and jaw in April
2010.

His wife Samia called 999 as his condition deteriorated and an ambulance arrived at their Evtington home.

A paramedic examined him and recorded he had been coughing but had no cardiac symptoms and the crew left 25
minutes later.

Mr Hussain took her husband to the family GP about half an hour later.

He was concerned the symptoms indicated a heart attack and called 999 but during the call Mr Hussain collapsed.

An ambulance crew was unable to resuscitate him and he died half an hour later.

Emas denied liability but following a five-day trial at Nottingham County Court in November 2015 a judge found
the service liable.

Now the familyhave received a payout from Emas.

Source: leicestermercury
Man rushed to hospital after fall at the former British Sugar Site, in Stourport Road
Man rushed to hospital after fall at the former British Sugar Site, in Stourport Road
Published 20th Apr 2016

A MAN has been airlifted to hospital after falling from a ladder at the former British Sugar Site, off Stourport Road, Kidderminster, this morning.

West Midland Ambulance Service were called to the incident at the construction site just before 9am this morning (Tuesday, April 19). 

A man in his 40s, believed to be working on the site, had fallen 10 foot from a ladder and had suffered facial and neck injuries.

A spokesman from WMAS said: "The man, believed to be in his 40s, had reportedly been knocked unconscious after falling around 10 feet from a ladder.

"A Midlands Air Ambulance crew, from Cosford, with a doctor on board and a land ambulance attended the scene.

"When ambulance staff arrived the man had thankfully regained consciousness and was treated for a facial injury on scene.

"Upon further assessment, ambulance staff and the doctor also suspected a neck injury so the man was fully immobilised with a neck collar and scoop stretcher before being airlifted in a stable condition to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in Birmingham, a specialist trauma centre, for onward care." 

Revealed: The most serious medical blunders made at Merseyside hospitals
Revealed: The most serious medical blunders made at Merseyside hospitals
Published 20th Apr 2016
Five patients were given the wrong surgery and another was given an insulin overdose

These are the potentially life-changing blunders made at Merseyside hospitals over the past 10 months.

They include five cases of patients being given the wrong operations and even a surgical object being left inside
someone after the surgery had ended.

There have been 11 ‘never events’ – so called because they should never happen – at Merseyside hospitals since
May last year, according to NHS England.

Every time a ‘never event’ occurs, it must be reported to the authorities and investigated to make sure similar
mistakes do no happen again.

'Never events' at Merseyside hospitals:

Five cases of 'wrong site surgery'

Two cases of drugs being administered by 'wrong route'

One overdose of insulin

One wrong implant or prosthesis

One 'foreign object' left inside body after surgery

Feeding tube wrongly inserted into patient's lungs

Dr Peter Williams, medical director of the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, said:
“We take ‘never events’ extremely seriously, we are open about them, we learn from them and we take action to
make further improvements in the care we provide to patients.”

A spokesman for Alder Hey said: “We take any incident extremely seriously and conduct a thorough investigation to
identify the cause of any incident, recommend key learnings and reduce the likelihood of similar incidents
happening in the future.”

Dianne Brown, director of nursing and midwifery at Liverpool Women’s Hospital, added: “The trust does not
experience many ‘never events’.

“However, when we do, the public can be assured that we investigate them thoroughly and try to learn as much from
them as we can so as to ensure they do not happen again.”

Source: liverpoolecho

Senior NHS weight-loss surgeon struck off after six patients die in horrific circumstances
Senior NHS weight-loss surgeon struck off after six patients die in horrific circumstances
Published 20th Apr 2016
A leading weight-loss surgeon who also acted as an expert in cases of clinical negligence has been struck off
after committing a string of what's been described as "deplorable" mistakes in the care of his patients. Dugal
Heath, 59, a Fellow at the Royal College of Surgeons, was criticised by a medical tribunal for his clinical
performance relating to six patients who died in two years.

Grieving relatives said this week of their relief after hearing the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service's
(MPTS) decision to remove Heath from the medical register. The parents of one young mother who passed away said:
"It won't bring our daughter back and will never make it easier for our granddaughter, who has lost her mum, but
we're glad he was struck off. He won't be able to do it to anyone else."

Heath's errors – described in a MPTS hearing last month as "extraordinary" and doing "irremediable" damage –
included subjecting patients to the wrong procedures, accidentally damaging internal organs during surgery and
even accusing a patient who starved for months on end of making up her illness.

One individual who went in for a routine gastric bypass came out with a damaged liver, an injured colon and a
torn bowel due to Heath's "rough" handling and poor use of medical instruments. The patient died a week later.

Another died having suffered heavy internal bleeding while under Heath's knife, with the patient closed up and
left haemorrhaging in the hospital ward. A third effectively starved for months on end after a blockage in her
intestine was not found, and she was told by Heath that her symptoms were "psychological".

The Whittington NHS Hospital in north London – where Heath was employed as a senior consultant – this week
apologised to those affected by Heath's misconduct, saying it was "truly sorry". It now faces a string of
potentially costly legal cases, with relatives of Heath's former patients alleging a failure in the duty of care.

Source: ibtimes
Motorcyclist who lost job after suffering terrible injuries in accident receives compensation
Motorcyclist who lost job after suffering terrible injuries in accident receives compensation
Published 20th Apr 2016
The last thing Richard Wiltshire remembers is leaving Tesco at around 8pm with nappies for his grandchild.

The next moment he was coming around after five days in intensive care at Southmead Hospital, with no knowledge
of how he found himself there.

The 50-year-old later learnt that on his way home to Brislington on his motorbike a car had pulled out of a
driveway on Callington Road and attempted to do a u-turn.

As a result Richard, 50, was given no chance of avoiding the collision and he was thrown from his bike and
underneath the vehicle.

The impact had left him with fractures to his right arm, left leg and face, a bleed on his brain and lacerations
to his spleen.

"Everything I am telling you is what I have been told by other people because it's a complete blur for me."
Richard says of the accident in July last year.

"The last thing I remember is leaving Tesco. Luckily for me there were three independent witnesses but
frustratingly I don't know who they are. I would like to know because one woman stayed with me until the
ambulance came and I would love to say thank you."

Worried by his tardiness, his wife of 26 years, Paula, had driven the grandchildren to the scene to look for him,
before seeing the police roadblock and realising the awful truth.

Understandably officers were unable to tell her if Richard was dead or alive and she travelled to hospital in the
back of a police car sick to the stomach.

"In many ways it was far worse for my family because I had no idea what was going on,"

Thankfully he pulled through but his injuries meant that his job as a production engineer for GKN Aerospace was
no longer something he could continue and he took voluntary redundancy.

"I liked work, it was a good team and we all got on well," he said.

"It took me abroad and was a very satisfying job. It felt like you were part of a big family and that's what I
miss the most."

As a result of his injuries his "brilliant wife" Paula had to quit her part time job to look after Richard who
for the first four months out of hospital was bed-ridden and needed 24 hour care.

Richard has now been awarded compensation.

Source: bristolpost
Woman who suffered heart attack wins payout after NHS claimed she only had heartburn
Woman who suffered heart attack wins payout after NHS claimed she only had heartburn
Published 19th Apr 2016
A grandfather has won an NHS payout after his wife of 45 years had a heart attack while he went to the shop to
get her medicine - when a call handler misdiagnosed her symptoms as heartburn.

Brian Kinsey went to the shop to buy antacids and paracetamol for his wife Patricia, after an NHS Direct worker
wrongly ruled that an ambulance was not required for her chest and stomach pains - only for him to find her
unresponsive when he returned.

The call handler advised that Patricia's symptoms were signs of an acid reflux, when in fact she was suffering a
cardiac arrest and died in hospital within three hours.

Devastated grandfather-of-two Brian said it was 'heartbreaking' that Patricia - known as Ann - lost consciousness
without him by her side.

"From 6pm, I described Ann's symptoms in three phone calls and was told to take her to a drop-in centre or A&E.

"She was in no fit state to be taken anywhere. I couldn't move her because of the pain in her chest and abdomen.
She needed an ambulance.

"I was told that she either had gastroenteritis or an acid reflux, and they advised that the best thing for her
would be some over-the-counter medicine.

"I didn't want to leave Ann but I had to go and buy them. I got back 25 minutes later and she was unresponsive.
Gone.

"I called 999 and they spend an hour trying to resuscitate her at the house, then another 30 minutes in New Cross
Hospital.

"She was pronounced dead at 8.30pm. It was a complete tragedy. If the ambulance had been sent when I called,
there's a chance she could have survived.

"I miss her every day. We used to love going on cruises together. Since she died, I went on one and it was the
worst thing I ever did. I couldn't enjoy it without her." Brian has now received an undisclosed settlement after
the NHS Direct Trust admitted 68-year-old Waitrose checkout worker Ann had been wrongly diagnosed.

Source: express
Stafford family's 18 months of torment after hospital death
Stafford family's 18 months of torment after hospital death
Published 19th Apr 2016
The family of a Stafford businessman died a week after gastric bypass surgery have gone through "18 months of
hell" in the run-up to his inquest.

University Hospital of North Midlands Trust, which runs Royal Stoke University Hospital, has apologised for its
failings in the care of Nadim Muzzfar Butt, who died there in September 2014.

The 48-year-old father of three, who ran construction firm Gemini Steel, endured agonising pain in the days
leading up to his death. An inquest heard that his death could have been avoided if emergency surgery to tackle a
blockage in his bowel had been performed just 12 hours earlier.

North Staffordshire Coroner Ian Smith concluded that Mr Butt died from "complications of gastric bypass surgery,
to which neglect contributed."

Speaking after the hearing Mr Butt's sister Diba said the family was happy with the outcome of the inquest, but
still felt lost without "the pillar of our family".

"It's quite hard to accept that it could have been prevented. We have gone through 18 months of hell and we
weren't able to get on with the process of grieving."

Dr John Oxtoby, Medical Director at University Hospitals of North Midlands Trust, said: "We would like to offer
our sincere condolences to the family of Nadim Butt and wholeheartedly apologise for the failings in his care.

"The Trust carried out an investigation following Mr Butt's death.

"This found that all Trust policies and procedures were followed, which are based on National Institute of
Clinical Excellence and British Obesity and Metabolic Surgical Society recommendations.

"However, as the inquest also found, the investigation did find that access to on-call bariatric consultants
needs to be improved."

"Although nothing can turn back the clock and bring Nadim back, we hope that we can work with the family to
obtain justice for them in his memory and help them to find the answers they are searching for so they can start
the long process of coming to terms with his death."

Source: staffordshirenewsletter
"Serious" crash closes Worcestershire road- Two vehicles involved
Published 14th Apr 2016

A Worcestershire road has been closed after a "serious" crash involving a car and a lorry.

It happened on the A443 near Lindridge. and closures are in place between Newnham Bridge and Abberley at around 6.35am.

Ambulance, air ambulance and fire service are at the scene.

West Mercia Police tweeted: "Officers are currently at the scene of a serious collision on the A443 near Lindridge, Worcestershire.

"Road closures are in place between Newnham Bridge and Abberley- motorists are advised to take alternative routes."

£47k pay out for Buxton dental patient
£47k pay out for Buxton dental patient
Published 5th Apr 2016

A patient has been awarded £47,000 damages after four decades of neglect by dentist left them facing the loss of eight teeth.

The patient, who does not wish to be named, of the now-retired dentist Allan Clark, had regularly attended at Broad Walk Dental Surgery in Buxton, Derbyshire, from the 1970s onwards to see Mr Clark for check-ups and treatment.

The patient’s records showed routine fillings and occasional scale and polishes had been carried out, however, during this entire period of care not a single X-ray was taken, which an independent dental expert said would have revealed gum disease.

It was only when the dentist retired from the practice in 2012 and the patient started seeing another dentist at the surgery that the widespread gum disease, which was destroying the patient’s gums and putting teeth at risk, was uncovered.

The patient, in their 50s, has since had to have four teeth removed and has been awarded £47,000 damages.

In the legal claim against Mr Clark, an independent dental expert concluded that the patient was also likely to lose another four teeth in the future, whilst a further three teeth will need urgent and costly treatment.

In his report as part of the claim, the independent expert said: “In my opinion the dental records commencing in 1972 demonstrate decades of supervised neglect with a failure to provide oral hygiene instruction and preventative treatment.”

Insurers acting on behalf of Mr Clark accepted the claims, stating: “It is accepted that Mr Clark failed to provide an acceptable standard of care to the patient throughout most of his years of attendance.”

The dentist also accepted failing to carry out reasonable care and skill when carrying out root canal treatment on three teeth, between 1995 and 2003.

Source: buxtonadvisor

Walsall GP surgeries putting 'patients at risk'
Walsall GP surgeries putting 'patients at risk'
Published 5th Apr 2016

The GP practice in Cannock Road, New Invention – one of two surgeries rated inadequate by inspectors

Ambar Medical Centre in Palfrey which has some 2,300 patients and New Invention Health Centre in Willenhall which has around 6,300 patients have both been criticised by inspectors. 

Ambar, which is based at Milton House, was rated inadequate in every single category, including safety, effectiveness and leadership. 

Inspectors criticised the practice, saying ‘patients were at risk of harm’, and that the care and treatment they received ‘did not always reflect current evidence-based guidance’.

They added that the reporting of incidents, near misses and concerns was not regular practice and that it had no success measures as it was not comparing itself to other practices both locally and nationally.

The GP who used to run the practice, Dr Fasihuddin Ahmed, has since retired and the practice has been taken over by a Dr Hammad Lodhi.

David Williams, the director of commissioning for NHS England in the West Midlands, said: “Patients are at the heart of everything that NHS England does. We are aware of the outcome of the Care Quality Commission’s recent inspection of Ambar Medical Centre in Walsall.  

"Dr Ahmed, who was the GP at Ambar Medical Centre, has since retired and a new GP, Dr Lodhi, has taken over the practice. 

"We are working with Walsall Clinical Commissioning Group, Dr Lodhi and other members of staff at the practice to support any improvements.”

New Invention Health Centre was rated good for its effectiveness, level of caring, responsiveness and its leadership. But failed the inspection after being rated inadequate for its safety. 

Inspectors raised concerns that equipment was out of date, ‘no evidence of cleaning schedules’ were in place and that staff were being asked to act as chaperones but had had no formal training.

Mr Williams said: “Every patient who uses the NHS has the right to expect the best possible care and treatment. 

"We are working with Walsall Clinical Commissioning Group and the practice to help it make the improvements that are needed.

“Patients should continue to contact the practice as usual if they need medical help.”

Source: expressandstar

Cambridgeshire family suing Addenbrooke’s over toddlers birth which left her with cerebral palsy
Cambridgeshire family suing Addenbrooke’s over toddlers birth which left her with cerebral palsy
Published 5th Apr 2016

Health bosses at Addenbrooke's have admitted liability in a legal battle with a Cambridgeshire family, who are blaming the hospital for their toddler's birth injuries.

Health bosses at Addenbrooke's have admitted liability in a legal battle with a Cambridgeshire family, who are blaming the hospital for their toddler's birth injuries.

The 3-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, is said to have suffered oxygen starvation and brain damage before her birth at the hospital in May 2012.

Despite an emergency caesarean delivery, and her intellect being "markedly preserved", she has been left with cerebral palsy, according to a writ issued at London's High Court.

Now, through her mother, the girl is suing Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, which runs Addenbrooke's and the Rosie Hospital, for compensation.

The writ claims that she should have been delivered earlier and that her "brain injury would have been avoided" had she been born just seven minutes before she was.

The girl, whilst suffering physical problems with controlling her movements, is clever and her intellect has mercifully been preserved, her lawyers say.

However, she is at risk of developing epilepsy and may have cognitive difficulties in future that are as yet undetected due to her tender years, they added.

The value of the claim is uncertain due to her youth, but multi-million pound pay-outs are commonplace when birth injury cases are successful.

The defence of the NHS trust was not available from the court and the contents of the writ have yet to be tested in evidence before a judge.

A Cambridge University Hospital's (CUH) spokesman said: "The trust has admitted liability in this matter and apologised unreservedly to the family.

Source: Cambridge-news


Medics admit causing death of Northampton man after missing blocked artery
Medics admit causing death of Northampton man after missing blocked artery
Published 31st Mar 2016

Jessica McAllister says she and partner Lawrence Wright were inseperable - but he died after medics did not treat him for a blocked artery, despite the fact it had showed up on scans.

A Northampton woman whose partner died after medics failed to diagnose a blocked artery has been awarded a six-figure settlement.

Lawrence Wright, 40, was given steroids for suspected Crohn’s disease after he was admitted to Kettering General Hospital with vomiting and diarrhoea.

Northampton man Lawrence Wright was mis-diagnosed by medics in 2014, which ultimately led to his death.

A scan revealed a blockage of the artery supplying blood to his bowel, but the results were not reviewed for more than a week and he was still waiting to be referred for surgery when he collapsed.

He died shortly afterwards – just over two weeks after going into hospital – on August 18, 2014.

Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has now admitted that if action had been taken sooner, he would still be alive.

Mr Wright’s partner Jessica McAllister says she is still waiting for a proper apology and reassurances that lessons will be learned to prevent another tragedy.

“I had a bad feeling the whole time he was in there, I knew something was wrong,” she said.

“I put in a complaint after he died and they tried to say they couldn’t have foreseen this happening. I knew deep down that wasn’t true, but it was only through legal action that they admitted it.”

“It made me really angry. Not only did they take Lawrence away, but they forced me to go through that fight to prove that they had done something wrong.

“Now they have admitted what they have done, they owe me an explanation.”

Ms McAllister, 27, who is studying English literature and creative writing at the University of Northampton, says she is still struggling to come to terms with her partner’s death.

They had been going out for five years, living together in Northampton and had talked about getting married and starting a family.

She added: “We were inseparable from the moment we met. I fell in love with his intelligence, his sense of humour and how much he cared about his family and friends.

“I was in shock for a long time and I still struggle now.

“I just want people to know so this doesn’t happen to anyone else.

“If your instinct tells you something is wrong, go with it. Speak up and get a second opinion.

“You can’t afford to take chances with your health.”

A spokesman for Kettering General Hospital said; “The Trust would like to again offer Jessica our sincere condolences. The care and treatment provided to Lawrence by the Trust has been fully reviewed by the medical team and the Trust Medical Director.

“While we are unable to comment directly on this sad case, we can provide reassurance that there has been learning as a result.”

Source: Northamptonchron

Man’s testicle cut off in error: NHS blunders exposed
Man’s testicle cut off in error: NHS blunders exposed
Published 31st Mar 2016

The quantity of NHS avoidable mistakes with patients is a “disgrace”.

A recent analysis by the Press Association has found more than 1,000 NHS patients in England in the past four years have suffered from serious and yet avoidable mistakes.

A case of a man who had a whole testicle removed instead of a troublesome cyst is just one example of the so-called ‘never events’ reported in the analysis.

“The fact that so many of these ‘never events’ are still happening is clearly appalling, but it is important to realise that huge numbers of avoidable mistakes occur across the country every day.

“The effect of these mistakes can be devastating for the patient, their family and their friends, yet the NHS as a whole is not addressing the causes of these mistakes.”

“There are no national rules or guidance for how investigations into mistakes should be carried out. Individual hospitals investigate their own errors, and unsurprisingly they usually conclude that they were not responsible for these mistakes.

“However, when the Health Service Ombudsman recently reviewed 150 of these investigations, they concluded that the hospitals had failed to identify mistakes in 73% of cases.”

Other incidents of never events include patients receiving the wrong blood type during transfusions and others being given the wrong drugs.

The analysis showed there were:

254 never events from April 2015 to the end of December 2015

306 never events from April 2014 to March 2015

338 never events from April 2013 to March 2014

290 never events from April 2012 to March 2013

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter. 

Source: clitheroeadvertiser

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She added: “We were inseparable from the moment we met. I fell in love with his intelligence, his sense of humour and how much he cared about his family and friends.

“I was in shock for a long time and I still struggle now.

“I just want people to know so this doesn’t happen to anyone else.

“If your instinct tells you something is wrong, go with it. Speak up and get a second opinion.

“You can’t afford to take chances with your health.”

A spokesman for Kettering General Hospital said; “The Trust would like to again offer Jessica our sincere condolences. The care and treatment provided to Lawrence by the Trust has been fully reviewed by the medical team and the Trust Medical Director.

“While we are unable to comment directly on this sad case, we can provide reassurance that there has been learning as a result.”

Source: Northamptonchron

Revealed: 1,000 patients forced to wait 12 hours at Walsall Manor Hospital
Revealed: 1,000 patients forced to wait 12 hours at Walsall Manor Hospital
Published 31st Mar 2016

More than 1,000 people had to wait over 12 hours to be seen at Walsall Manor Hospital’s A&E department last year, new figures have revealed.

Walsall Manor Hospital, where 1,016 people had to wait more than 12 hours to be seen in the A&E department

The 1,016 people who had to wait over half a day last year is more than the previous two years combined, where 817 people were left with the marathon wait. 

Some months have seen over 1,000 per cent increases.

The figures have been branded ‘disappointing’ by council leader Mike Bird who has again called on central government to put more money into the borough’s hospital, as opposed to New Cross in Wolverhampton.

As well as the 1,016 people who had to wait 12 hours or more last year, exactly 9,000 patients breached the four-hour guideline wait, according to the freedom of information request.

In January last year, 211 people had to wait 12 hours or more at Walsall Manor’s A&E department. 

This figure was 15 in 2014 and 13 in 2013, an increase of 1,400 per cent. Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust has apologised for the long waits, and blamed the surge in figures on increased demand at the hospital.

Steven Vaughan, interim chief operating officer at Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust said: “We continue to face significant pressure from the number of admissions to our emergency department, including patients from Staffordshire who are now coming to Walsall for treatment. 

"Unfortunately, this does impact on our capacity and this means some patients are not seen as quickly as they should be. 

“We are doing all we can to continue to provide services to our local population. Our community healthcare teams are working hard to avoid people being unnecessarily admitted to hospital and also to support patients at home following discharge. 

"We are also working with social care services, nursing homes and local GPs to ensure patients ready to leave hospital can be discharged promptly.”

Earlier this year Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust was placed into special measures with particular concerns raised about the Manor’s A&E department. 

Walsall Council leader, Councillor Bird,  said: “These figures are disappointing and symptomatic of the Government investing in New Cross and not in the Manor. A&E and maternity are two big issues and there’s only one way to solve it and that’s with money.”

Source: expressandstar


‘One patient died - it was complete and utter chaos’ - senior surgeon claims he was sacked for blowing the whistle
‘One patient died - it was complete and utter chaos’ - senior surgeon claims he was sacked for blowing the whistle
Published 29th Mar 2016

A senior liver surgeon who worked at both the Royal Blackburn and Burnley General Hospitals claimed he was sacked for blowing the whistle about alleged dangerous working practices.

Aditya Agrawal told a judge at an employment tribunal, the practices imposed on him and his former colleagues, contributed to at least one death and one unnecessary major operation taking place.

The £70,000-a-year surgeon told the Manchester hearing that, bosses at East Lancashire Hospitals Trust, were determined to punish him rather than tackle the dangers and ‘malpractice’ he exposed.

Trust bosses are set to contest the consultants claims as the hearing unfolds this week.

Mr Agrawal is appealing the decision to dismiss him in July 2015, which followed a four year suspension on full pay, on the grounds of unfairness, racial discrimination and punishment for whistleblowing.

He told the tribunal headed by Judge David Franey, that after his appointment to his consultants post, the trust and its clinical director Rob Watson ‘abruptly’ imposed a new roster which was ‘a recipe for disaster’.

Mr Agrawal, who until this point had an ‘unblemished’ record with trust bosses, said he and a small number of consultants were overworked and patient safety and continuity of care were compromised.

Mr Agrawal told the tribunal: “There was utter chaos. Mistakes often occurred.

“Thus was a high risk patient who had improved clinically and did not need surgery ended up having major abdominal surgery with post operative complications.

“A case in point was the unfortunate patient in her early 30s with a benign liver condition who died in the Intensive Care Unit from mis-management and lack of timely intervention. With such incidents occurring, it was impossible not to be alarmed.

“Disaster was waiting to happen.”

In another case the surgeon said an operation took place at Burnley General against his advice leading to ‘post operative complications’ and the patients transfer to the Royal Blackburn Hospital for urgent treatment.

Mr Agrawal said he raised his concerns about the new ‘Consultant of the Day’ system with Mr Watson and then trust medical director Rineke Schram.

He highlighted other concerns including operating without basic instruments, operating in small theatres with poor lighting, a broken operating table and inexperienced ancillary staff.

He told the hearing he was reprimanded and told not to raise concerns again.

The consultant said he was then investigated over a series of ‘malicious, vexatious and frivolous’ allegations and ‘imaginary deaths and complications had been conjured up to create a case against me’.

Mr Agrawal said he was ‘abruptly and arbitrarily suspended’ and then dismissed on ‘entirely fabricated’ grounds damaging his career and causing financial and professional damage.

Source: lancashiretelegraph


Doncaster mum's stillborn pregnancy hell
Doncaster mum's stillborn pregnancy hell
Published 29th Mar 2016

Mum Kelly Attree, whose pregnancy was classed as ‘high risk’ as she was carrying twins and was diagnosed with gestational diabetes, delivered a healthy girl, Bliss, at 37 weeks.

But Mrs Attree’s son, Samuel, was delivered stillborn.

The Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals Trust, which runs Doncaster Royal Infirmary, has agreed to pay Mrs Attree, who has three older children aged 11, 15, and 18 with husband Tom, a five-figure sum.

It was only when Mrs Attree was booked in for an induction at 37 weeks that she was told her baby boy had died.

Mrs Attree said: “Even though I know it wasn’t my fault, I beat myself up because I had gestational diabetes and wonder if that was part of why it happened.”

Mr Sewa Singh, Medical Director for the Trust, told The Star: “On behalf of the Trust, I want to say sorry to Mrs Attree and her family for their tragic loss.

“As ever we will seek to identify any lessons we can learn from this sad event to continue to improve the quality and safety for mothers and babies.”

Mrs Attree, 40, who has three older children aged 11, 15, and 18 with husband Tom, in addition to Bliss, now four, had been admitted to hospital several times in the run up to the delivery.

She had been experiencing ‘tightenings’ but was always monitored and then sent home.

She was eventually booked in to be induced at 37 weeks, and all the while she had been led to believe her babies were healthy.

When she arrived for the induction of her twins, on September 21, 2011, a midwife routinely checked her babies’ heart rates, and she was told by staff they could not find a heartbeat for Samuel.

Mrs Attree said: “We were so excited to pack the bags and go to hospital, and my children were expecting us to bring two babies home, but we didn’t.

“When I arrived at hospital the midwife found my daughter Bliss’s heartbeat straight away and went to find Samuel’s and went quiet. She went off to get someone else, and they said they were really sorry but they couldn’t find Samuel’s heartbeat. I just screamed. It was like I was in a dream afterwards, I felt like I was in a trance.

“I hadn’t had any reason to worry, if anything, I had felt more movement in the later stages of the pregnancy, but I have since been told that babies can be more active in their last hours, and that is something that haunts me now.”

Source: doncasterfreepress

NHS must admit when it has made a serious error
NHS must admit when it has made a serious error
Published 29th Mar 2016

To save some money for the NHS, the Government plans to cut its legal bill for medical negligence compensation claims.

Although the public purse is indeed not bottomless, paying compensation is necessary while the NHS continues to cause unnecessary harm.

The Government’s priority should be to ensure the NHS serves its purpose to help people.

When things go wrong which shouldn’t go wrong injured patients and their families need guidance and legal representation.

The Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL), has some ideas for improvements to benefit both our beloved health service and its patients.

The NHS must admit when it is wrong. Failure by the NHS to apologise is the most common complaint raised by patients in England and forces some people down the legal route in search of answers.

A ‘deny, defend, delay’ tactic is used all too often, and drags legal cases out unnecessarily.

Obtaining medical records as part of a medical negligence claims can take up to six months when official guidelines state they should be released within 21 days.

Patients and their lawyers do not have time to waste. Quicker recovery of records would reduce a lot of work, uncertainty, and the negative knock-on effect such delays have on costs.

But the easiest and most effective way to cut the NHS’s legal bill is for it to learn from its own failures and stop repeating harm.

Each claim the NHS has to pay compensation for represents a person who was injured unnecessarily and who needs to get their life back on track.

Source: thestar

It is an amazing system that the payer of the compensation in this case the NHS through the Government that funds the system decides to cut the amount it has to pay so therefore saving money. C&S Solicitors are specialist medical negligence solicitors and as well as being awarded corporate accreditation through the association of personal injury lawyers are also panel solicitors for legal insurers carrying out specialist medical negligence claims.

 

C&S Solicitors would urge the government to look at the problem of why they pay the money namely the inefficiencies of the claims handling process along with lack of admissions of liability sometimes this takes over 3 years which simply raises the costs payable. The system of fear as demonstrated through recent employment cases again consultants and other medical staff demonstrate that anyone found whistle blowing have their career effected.

 

Would you let a criminal choose their jail sentence? No, so why should the body that funds and controls the NHS decide how much they should pay out. The legal work carried out in these cases is dictated by the way the NHS and it representatives behave. This is where the changes need to be made simply taking away money from the patients who have been harmed by wrongdoer i.e. the NHS gives that NHS no incentive to change in fact quite the opposite. Each claim made against the NHS causes procedures to be changed and tightened which this firm has seen time and time again therefore helping future patients.

 

It is time that the NHS is held to account and making it cheap to harm patients is not the way to do it.

The Government increase court fees again
The Government increase court fees again
Published 23rd Mar 2016
On the 21st March 2016 the Civil Proceedings, Family Proceedings and Upper Tribunal Fees (Amendment) Order 2016 came into force an application on notice where no other fee is specified is now £255.00 and an application by consent or without notice where no other fee is specified is now £100.00. These are increases of up to 100% on the previous rates. This again attacks access to justice and makes litigation harder for the average person.
Caernarfon woman awarded thousands in compensation against Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board
Caernarfon woman awarded thousands in compensation against Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board
Published 23rd Mar 2016

A Caernarfon woman who has suffered years of needless agony since breaking her wrist during a football match has been awarded £39,000 compensation against the NHS.

Leesa Arkless was playing in goal during the April 2009 match when a ball hit her with such force that it knocked her to the ground.

She fell on her left hand and her fingers were bent backwards so far that she could feel the back of them touching her arm.

She went to Ysbyty Gwynedd in Bangor and that was the start of what became a medical nightmare for Ms Arkless.

After examination by a doctor and an X-ray failed to pick up the fracture, she was given a splint and told she would get better in a few weeks.

But, by the end of 2009, the pain in her wrist was so bad that she felt she had to return to the hospital.

Top judge Mr Justice Dove said she had to wait so long that she had to leave without seeing a doctor “for reasons associated with childcare”.

More months passed and it was only in February 2010 that she was seen by a doctor in the hospital’s A&E department and the fracture was finally diagnosed.

In May 2011, she had to have bone grafted from her hip in a bid to mend the break, but the operation was not successful, the High Court heard.

Despite further surgery in 2013, the bones in her wrist have still not properly united and she will need another operation in the future.

The judge described Ms Arkless as an “entirely credible” witness who had in no way exaggerated or embellished her continuing pain.

Awarding her damages, the judge found that the doctor who first examined her in the aftermath of the football match had been negligent.

She had not been told to return to the hospital if her symptoms got worse and she had not been “competently examined”, he ruled.

Although the judge was “not prepared to condemn” the technique the doctor used, he had, on this occasion, failed to treat his patient with “a reasonable standard of care”.

After Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board was found liable, Ms Arkless’ damages were agreed at £39,000.

Source: dailypost

Family who claim their son was left brain-damaged by an infection caught at the John Radcliffe set to receive payout
Family who claim their son was left brain-damaged by an infection caught at the John Radcliffe set to receive payout
Published 23rd Mar 2016

A family who claim their son was brain-damaged by an infection caught at Oxford’s John Radcliffe Hospital in the 1980s could receive a multi-million pound payout. 

Paul Kirtland, now 32, was diagnosed with brain damage at five-months-old and he grew up suffering from cerebral palsy, epilepsy, hearing loss and severe mobility problems.

His parents Dushka and David say it was caused by klebsiella oxytoca – an infection they claim he caught at the hospital in May 1983.

The family began legal proceedings against the then Oxford University Hospitals Trust in 2013 to help pay for their son’s care after their deaths.

Now, after years of legal proceedings, the family could be awarded a multi-million pound settlement after their lawyers reached an agreement with the trust on March 11.

Mrs Kirtland, 62 from Headington, said the settlement has given them the peace of mind to know he will be cared for after she and her husband die.

She added: "It has been a long journey to get to this point.

"We always wanted to look after Paul – we never wanted him in a home or anything like that and if we had our way, we would look after him at home forever.

"He is our wonderful boy and we love him but as we got older we started to realise that love won’t be enough to look after him when we are gone.

"All that we ever wanted to know was that Paul would be looked after for as long as he lives."

Source: oxfordtimes


Family of disabled Harrogate boy to sue NHS for massive damages
Family of disabled Harrogate boy to sue NHS for massive damages
Published 23rd Mar 2016

The boy, who was born at Harrogate District Hospital in 2004, lives with cerebral palsy after being starved of oxygen during his delivery, the family’s lawyers claim.

They say that that staff at the hospital failed to properly monitor the boy’s heart rate during his birth or to pick up ominous signs that he was struggling.

Through his mother, the boy, now aged 11, is suing Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, claiming compensation that could run into several million pounds.

Mr Spencer says in a writ issued at London’s High Court that records of the delivery show that the boy’s heart beat was normal, although he must have been suffering profound distress.

“The only plausible explanation is that this was a maternal heart rate mistakenly taken to be the foetal heart rate,” the barrister claims.

He adds that medics ought to have known that they were dealing with a “high risk” pregnancy and should have been monitoring the baby’s heart rate continuously.

Mr Spencer says that the tragic delay in the boy’s birth has left him with brain damage and significant mental and physical disabilities.

He cannot get around without the use of a walking frame and also has behavioral difficulties, the writ states.

Source: harrogateadvertiser

Three injured in serious crash on Worcester Road
Three injured in serious crash on Worcester Road
Published 21st Mar 2016

Three people have been injured in a serious crash which has closed a section of Worcester Road, near Kidderminster, this afternoon.

The two-vehicle crash took place on the A450, Worcester Road, between Mustow Green and Shenstone at around 1.10pm this afternoon (Monday, March 21).

It is reported that three people have been injured in the crash and are currently being treated at the scene.

Police and ambulance crews are in attendance. The Midlands Air Ambulance has also been called to the scene.

West Mercia Police have closed Goldness Corner, at the junction of the A449, near to Black Bridge, to the junction at Mustow Green on the A442 and A450.

A spokesman from West Midlands Ambulance Service said: "We currently have two ambulances, a community paramedic, a paramedic support officer, a MERIT trauma doctor and the Midlands Air Ambulances from Cosford and Strensham air bases on the scene.

"Three patients are currently being treated on the scene."

Father who had his ear sliced off when London bus crashed into tree to sue operator
Father who had his ear sliced off when London bus crashed into tree to sue operator
Published 17th Mar 2016

Ireneusz Luszczewski, 49, was enjoying a trip around the city with his young son last August when the double-decker hit an overhanging branch. 

The impact tore the roof off the bus, sending debris flying across the packed upper deck. Four passengers — including a new bride — were hospitalised.

Mr Luszczewski, known as Irek, was hit in the face by debris and the top half of his left ear was sliced off. 

He is now planning to sue the bus owners, Golden Tours Ltd, and wants to know who was responsible for the crash. At the time of the incident a spokesman said the company was investigating what had happened.

“I was shocked and terrified when the accident happened,” Mr Luszczewski said. “I feared for my safety and the safety of my young son. 

“As a result of an accident, which I believe was caused by the negligence of the bus company, I have been left with life-changing injuries and very bad memories. I would like answers to my questions about how this was allowed to happen.”

About 40 tourists were on the upper deck of the partially open-top bus when it hit the tree at around 1.10pm in Woburn Place, near Russell Square Tube station, on August 3. Stunned passengers comforted each other after the crash, which left the section of roof dangling against the side of the bus. 

Source: standard

Mother wins £50,000 pay-out from Bath's Royal United Hospital after late cancer diagnosis
Mother wins £50,000 pay-out from Bath's Royal United Hospital after late cancer diagnosis
Published 17th Mar 2016

Bath's Royal United Hospital has agreed to pay £50,000 to a Wiltshire mother whose metastatic breast cancer should have been diagnosed sooner.

The sum was agreed in an out-of-court settlement after an investigation commissioned by the woman's lawyers found that the diagnosis was delayed by nearly two years, resulting in the cancer spreading and the woman needing chemotherapy.

The woman, who wishes to remain anonymous, visited her local GP in March 2009 complaining of a lump on the left hand side of her neck and a persistent dry cough. She had had cancer in her left breast successfully treated in France nine years earlier.

Her GP referred her to the ear, nose and throat (ENT) department at the RUH where she underwent a CT scan which suggested she may have lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph nodes. She then underwent an endoscopy and a biopsy of her lymph nodes but unfortunately the sample taken was insufficient for a full assessment to be carried out.

Following an ENT review, the hospital decided there was no need to repeat the lymph node biopsy and instead carried out an MRI scan on her neck. This was reported as showing no cause for concern and the woman was diagnosed as suffering from "idiopathic vocal chord palsy" or weakness of the vocal chords which causes a progressively worsening cough and a weak, hoarse voice.

However, nearly two and a half years later in July 2011, she went back to her GP again suffering from tethering of the skin in the left hand side of her neck, an increase in the size of her left cervical lymph nodes and pins and needles going up and down her left arm, in addition to the continuing problems with her voice.

Following an urgent chest x-ray and ultrasound scan of her neck, she was referred to the cancer team at the RUH who confirmed that she was, in fact, suffering from metastatic breast cancer which had spread into her left shoulder and neck and involved the left brachial plexus, the network of nerve fibres that supplies the skin and muscles in the arms.

Extensive cancer treatment followed, including six gruelling courses of chemotherapy, which managed to halt the cancer's spread and improved her symptoms in her left arm and the weakness in her voice, but she was left very distressed and disappointed the hospital had failed to diagnose her cancer sooner.

Source: bathchronicle

Morecambe Bay hospitals subject five patients to ‘never event’ blunder ordeal
Morecambe Bay hospitals subject five patients to ‘never event’ blunder ordeal
Published 16th Mar 2016

A total of five patients at hospitals across Morecambe Bay have suffered from very serious mistakes which should never happen. 

The so-called "never events" took place at hospitals run by the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust between 2013 and December last year. 

They were among 1,100 patients who suffered from serious errors in England's hospitals over the past four years. 

Trust bosses said none of the five cases at UHMBT took place at Furness General Hospital - meaning they occurred either at Westmorland General Hospital in Kendal or Royal Lancaster Infirmary. 

So far in 2015/16, there have been two cases of wrong site surgery at UHMBT hospitals. 

This means surgery performed on the wrong body location. 

For example, the wrong knee, wrong eye, wrong patient, wrong limb, or wrong organ.

There were no "never events" in 2014/15, but three occurred in 2013/14. 

They included another wrong site surgery, and two cases of the wrong implant or prosthesis being fitted. 

The organisation refused to disclose specifically what type of error had been made, saying it would breach patient confidentiality. 

NHS said it published the details "as part of our commitment to be open and transparent about patient safety incident reporting". 

Source: nwemail

Police investigate death of woman at care home labelled 'Damnation House'
Police investigate death of woman at care home labelled 'Damnation House'
Published 16th Mar 2016

Police are investigating the death of an 89-year-old grandmother who was a resident at a luxury private care home branded ‘Damnation House’.

Officers from Greater Manchester Police’s Public Protection Unit are investigating claims that mum-of-three and gran-of-six Pat Crosby died as a result of criminal negligence at the Darnton House home in Ashton-under-Lyne.

The five-star home, which opened less than a year ago, was recently placed in special measures by watchdogs after it was branded “unsafe, uncaring and inadequate.”

The investigation began after Mrs Crosby’s youngest daughter, Anne Hinchliffe, 56, complained that she had found her mother lying unconscious and badly dehydrated, in a bed soiled with human faeces and medicines strewn all around.

She also complained that a nurse tried to force feed her porridge when she was unconscious.

Mrs Hinchliffe, of Stalybridge, claims her mother, who had six grandchildren aged between 24 and 40 and six great grandchildren, had not been seen by a carer for at least three hours and that medical records were later altered to try and hide this.

She says her mother had not been given any food for two days and had been refused a doctor for four days.

She died in Tameside General Hospital 10 days after being transferred to A&E by an emergency ambulance from the home’s Transitional Care Unit where she was being prepared to go back into the community.

 

Mrs Hinchliffe said: “I believe there was wilful neglect at the home - if I hadn’t turned up when I did to find her unconscious, she would just have been left to die. Then they falsified the medical records to cover it up. It was awful.

“A nurse tried to force porridge down her throat when she was still unconscious and only stopped when a doctor warned her that mum could choke.

“We are not looking for compensation or anything like that, but mum’s death was traumatic and we don’t want other people to go through what she went through.

“If someone is denied basic human rights like food and water, the people responsible need to be held to account. Darnton House was culpable in mum’s death, but the hospital Trust can’t distance themselves from what happened, because they funded the unit and sent her there.”

Source: manchestereveningnews

Mistreated cancer patients say hospital revoked promise
Mistreated cancer patients say hospital revoked promise
Published 16th Mar 2016

The GMC suspended Ian Paterson in 2012 after a review found he performed unnecessary or incomplete operations.

A patients' support group claims 3,500 patients will not be recalled after funding for them is withdrawn.

The Heart of England NHS trust, which runs Heartlands Hospital, said support had ended so it could stay independent.

Mr Paterson performed an unrecognised cleavage sparing operation, which left 700 patients at greater risk of breast cancer returning.

The GMC said the procedure, which left a small amount of tissue for cosmetic reasons, breached national guidelines because it risked the return of cancer.

A patient support group was set up for those affected, with promises of compensation and follow-up support by the trust.

However, the group has been told all support, contact and funding is to be withdrawn. Members have also been told two staff members, a support worker and an academic doctor who identified patients at risk have left and will not be replaced.

A trust spokesperson said: "The trust has for some time funded a room for the group to meet and a support worker. Following a conversation with the chief nurse at Heartlands, it was decided that this support had to come to an end.

"This was not for financial reasons but, given the ongoing inquiries, was so the hospital could remain independent and not be intertwined.

"It is also unusual for a hospital to fund one support group," she said.

Sir Ian Kennedy conducted a report in 2012 that stated: "The trust is wrestling with the further challenge of whether to recall patients who have undergone procedures other than mastectomies or CSM, for instance, a lumpectomy or a wide local excision.

"The concern is obvious: given what is known about the patients already reviewed, does the trust have a duty to look at all patients (around 3,500) to reassure both the patients and the trust that there are no further areas of concern?"

C&S Solicitors are one of a few specialist firms acting against mr Patterson and are also able to bring claims outside of the normal time limits due to a court order we are party to. Please contact us today to discuss this further and the help and assistance we may be able to provide.

Source: bbc


Teenage girl injured in Stourbridge crash
Teenage girl injured in Stourbridge crash
Published 15th Mar 2016

A girl of 16 was left with a head injury when she was hit by a car in Stourbridge today.

Paramedics said the girl's injury was potentially serious and she had been left unconscious for a short time before she was airlifted to hospital.

The woman driver was left shaken and taken to Russells Hall Hospital as a precaution.

It happened on Hodge Hill Avenue in Wollescote at around 8am.

West Midlands Ambulance Service spokesman Murray MacGregor said: "She had initially been reported to be unconscious but had started to come round while ambulance staff were treating her.

“After assessment, the doctor on the aircraft anaesthetised her at the scene before she was airlifted to Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham. She had also been immobilised.

“The car had considerable damage."

Source: expressandstar

Lady wins payout for misdiagnosed breast cancer patient
Lady wins payout for misdiagnosed breast cancer patient
Published 14th Mar 2016

The woman, who wishes to remain anonymous, had a history of breast cancer and had been successfully treated in 2000.

In 2009 she was referred by her GP to Bath’s Royal United Hospital (RUH) after complaining of a lump on the left hand side of her neck and a persistent dry cough.

But after undergoing tests she was told by specialists that she was suffering from weakness of the vocal chords.

Two and a half years later she went back to her GP complaining of tethering of the skin in the left hand side of her neck, an increase in the size of her left cervical lymph nodes and pins and needles in her left arm, in addition to continuing problems with her voice.

Following an urgent chest x-ray and ultrasound scan of her neck, she was referred to the RUH oncology team who confirmed that she was, in fact, suffering from breast cancer which had spread into her left shoulder and neck and involved the left brachial plexus, the network of nerve fibres that supplies the skin and muscles in the arms. 

Extensive oncology treatment followed, including six gruelling courses of chemotherapy, which managed to halt the cancer’s spread and improved her symptoms in her left arm and the weakness in her voice, but she was left very distressed and disappointed the hospital had failed to diagnose her cancer sooner.

She made a complaint to the RUH which denied any failings in the standard of care provided.

It revealed that the MRI scan carried out in 2009 had failed to detect a number of abnormalities which, if reported, would have resulted in her cancer being diagnosed and treated, probably with hormone therapy rather than chemotherapy, in or around October 2009 instead of 22 months later in 2011.

Source:  swindonbusiness

Patients recalled following suspension of 'Embarrassing Bodies' doctor
Patients recalled following suspension of 'Embarrassing Bodies' doctor
Published 14th Mar 2016

More than 200 patients have been recalled amid concerns over the practices of a doctor who appeared in Channel 4's Embarrassing Bodies.

Mr Arackal Narayan Manu Nair worked at Solihull Hospital, Heartlands Hospital and also private clinic Spire Parkway before he was suspended in April 2014, when colleagues raised alarms about procedures he was carrying out on patients.

The Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust has now invited patients of cancer surgeon Mr Manu Nair to information sharing events following concerns about his practice.

Mr Nair, who was a consultant urologist and clinical director at Heartlands hospital, is thought to have carried out radical prostatectomies on 170 patients.

A review is being carried out by the Royal College of Surgeons, and the Heart of England Trust will update patients about the investigation during events between the 21-30 March in the Lea Marston Hotel, St Paul’s Centre and the Renewal Christian Centre Solihull.

One client, who wishes to remain anonymous, has spoken out about his case:

I had two operations performed by Mr Nair, the first of which was a prostatectomy in January 2011.

He told me the risk of complication was very low - I can’t believe that over five years later I’ve had to have 33 sessions of radiotherapy to counter his mistake.

This was systematic and deliberate deception of hundreds of men by Mr Nair.

Source: ITV

Breaking news: Kidderminster accident
Breaking news: Kidderminster accident
Published 14th Mar 2016
Breaking: The A451 Stourport Road in Kidderminster is closed both ways between A442 Worcester Road and A4535 Sutton Road after an accident
Woman injured after being hit by cement mixer on Kidderminster road
Woman injured after being hit by cement mixer on Kidderminster road
Published 14th Mar 2016

A WOMAN has been injured after she was hit by a cement mixer on a busy Kidderminster road.

Police and West Midlands Ambulance Service were called to Stourport Road shortly before 3.10pm this afternoon when the incident occurred.

The Midlands Air Ambulance was also deployed to the scene.
 
A West Midlands Ambulance Spokesman said a female pedestrian, aged in her 30s, was hit by the HGV.

She suffered a head injury and was semi-conscious as she was being treated.

Kidderminster Police have confirmed that Stourport Road, near its junction with Northumberland Avenue, has been shut while emergency services deal with the incident.

The road currently remains closed while the incident is ongoing.

Source: Kidderminster Shuttle 

£50,000 for Wiltshire mum because her cancer was missed for two years by Bath hospital
£50,000 for Wiltshire mum because her cancer was missed for two years by Bath hospital
Published 9th Mar 2016
A woman whose two-year long sore throat and neck lumps turned out to be cancer has won 
£50,000 compensation from a Bath hospital which failed to diagnose her life-threatening 
condition.
 
The patient won the compensation from Bath's Royal United 
Hospital, after independent doctors decided that if the hospital had not bungled a biopsy, her 
cancer would have been diagnosed 22 months sooner.
 
The woman, who went on to endure intensive cancer treatment, initially complained to the 
RUH after that was over, but hospital chiefs denied they had done anything wrong.
 
She has now settled out of court, the patient, who had a history of cancer in her left breast, first went to her doctors in March 
2009 complaining of a lump on the left hand side of her neck and a persistent dry cough.
 
She was referred to the ENT department, and a CT scan suggested she had a lymphoma. But 
then a sample taken in a biopsy was insufficient for a proper assessment, and so the hospital 
decided there was no need to repeat that, and so the cancer was not spotted.
 
She was eventually diagnosed with having nothing more than a weakness of the vocal chords. 
Nearly two and a half years' later, the lump had got bigger and within days she was 
diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer, which had spread.
 
Source: westerndailypress
Trust to pay £12m compensation to boy brain damaged due to failures at Bishop Auckland Hospital
Trust to pay £12m compensation to boy brain damaged due to failures at Bishop Auckland Hospital
Published 9th Mar 2016
A boy who will need lifetime care after suffering brain damage shortly after his birth in a 
North-East hospital is to receive a compensation package worth £12 million.
 
Stephen Wootten developed low blood sugar after he was born at Bishop Auckland Hospital in 
County Durham in January 2004 and a failure to recognise he was feeding inadequately or 
give appropriate advice and treatment led to his injury.
 
Now 12, Stephen, who lives with his mother in Middlesex, has epilepsy, learning difficulties, 
memory issues and challenging behaviour.
 
He needs 24-hour care and the settlement approved at London's High Court on Tuesday will 
allow the purchase of adapted accommodation and the support of two carers around the clock from adulthood.
 
The damages, which will be paid by the County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust, include a £3 million lump sum and lifelong annual payments.
 
Judge Martin McKenna praised the unstinting care shown by Stephen's parents, Andrew and 
Stephanie.
 
Source: thenorthernecho
Tayside contracts worker hurt in accident gets payout from bosses
Tayside contracts worker hurt in accident gets payout from bosses
Published 9th Mar 2016
Tayside Contracts has defended its health and safety record after one of its former workers 
received compensation for suffering a crushed leg at work.
 
Melvin Price, 60, was rushed to Ninewells Hospital when a tarmac chipper rolled on to his left leg and trapped him while working on Roods Road in Kirriemuir.
 
Police and ambulance teams were at the scene within minutes on November 6 2012, to help 
the then 55-year-old and he was quickly freed.
 
After raising legal action against his former employer in April last year, Mr Price, of Arbroath, 
has now received an undisclosed settlement.
 
Proceedings originally called at the Court of Session, which at the time only dealt with cases 
worth £5,000 or more. A spokesman for Tayside Contracts declined to elaborate on the value 
of the final settlement.
 
But he stressed a safety review of the incident had put forward no recommendations to 
change working practices.
 
He said: “On the matter of safety improvements, a full investigation and safety review was 
undertaken at the time of the accident by our safety and training section and put forward no 
proposals to alter working practices for safety reasons.
 
“Our workforce can be assured that Tayside Contracts investigates every safety incident and, 
when required, alters working practices to eliminate any identified hazard.”
 
He added: “We are happy that the matter has now been settled and wish Mel well for the 
future.”
 
Mr Price declined to comment when approached by the Tele.
 
It is not known how long the worker had to spend in hospital recovering, but he was said to 
have suffered “crush-type” injuries to his lower leg.
 
At the time of the incident, Richard Cranny, deputy director of Tayside Contracts, said Mr 
Price was in a stable condition, but had suffered “serious fractures” in two places of his leg.
 
One of the company’s safety officers was sent immediately to the scene to investigate.
 
The tarmac chipper was being used in the town to lay down aggregate and soften the road 
finish when Mr Price was hurt.
 
Tayside Contracts employs about 2,500 people and is the commercial trading arm of Angus, 
Dundee City and Perth and Kinross councils.
 
Source: eveningtelegraph
Newborn baby died after mother waited six hours to see consultant at maternity ward
Newborn baby died after mother waited six hours to see consultant at maternity ward
Published 8th Mar 2016

The mother of a baby who died just three days after he was born waited six hours on busy maternity ward despite telling staff she could no longer feel him move, an inquest heard yesterday.

Gino Asquith was born at Calderdale Royal Hospital in Halifax without “showing signs of life” after several warnings were detected, including an unusually high heart rate, lack of movement and discoloured discharge.

Bradford Coroner’s Court heard yesterday that the hospital initially told mother Sarah Ellis, 28, there were no beds available and she would have to go to Huddersfield Birthing Centre.

She was sent home after being told her labour was not at an advanced stage. Later that day, November 7, 2014, she could no longer feel her baby move and returned to Calderdale.

Midwives on the ward identified symptoms suggesting the baby might have an infection but it was hours later when Miss Ellis, from Batley, was examined by a consultant.

She was given a button to press while waiting on the ward if she felt the baby move.

But six hours later the button had not been pressed and Gino was delivered through an emergency Caesarean section at 2.34am, November 9.

He was described at hearing as “floppy” and had to be resuscitated twice while being placed on a life support machine.

Three days later Sarah and her partner Adam Asquith were advised to withdraw treatment after Gino had suffered hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy – brain damage caused by lack of oxygen.

Ward co-ordinator, Sarah Balmforth, said there was shortfall of staff – at 4.5 – in the unit compared with the number of patients present at 8pm.

A computer system is used to take stock of staff and patient numbers at various points during evening shifts to ensure midwifes are working where they are required the most. She added that this figure only took fully qualified midwifes into account, not students or those in training.

Referring to Miss Ellis’s delayed medical review, which eventually revealed Gino’s serious condition, Ms Balmforth said: “I don’t believe her review could have taken place much earlier than it did because the doctors were busy.”

Midwife Briony Khalifa said the ward was “extremely busy” that evening, with around 18 women at the Calderdale Maternity Assessment Centre. The inquest also heard 18 more women were present in the labour unit, which was considered to be a greater number than usual.

Source: yorkshirepost

Compensation claims worth almost £9 million settled by healthcare trust since 2012
Compensation claims worth almost £9 million settled by healthcare trust since 2012
Published 8th Mar 2016

Almost £9 million has been spent settling clinical negligence compensation claims made against the Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust since 2012.

Figures obtained by the Journal show more than £5.5 million has been paid out in damages to patients claiming for compensation since 2012.

The Trust said the overall the number of claims made against it was below average and that costs for claims have in fact increased.

Between 2012 and 2013 the Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust received 21 compensation claims.

It said that £1,079,252 was paid out in damages and £1,106,360 was spent on legal fees for the trust and claimants.

From 2013 to 2014 the Trust faced 27 claims of clinical negligence. £2,125,082 was paid out in damages and £936,932 was spent on legal fees.

In the last period figures are available for, covering 2014 to 2015, the Trust received 24 claims, £2,350,033 was paid out in damages and £1,361,189 was spent on legal fees.

The amounts total £8,958,848.

Dr Alison Diamond, the Trust's chief executive, said while these numbers appear large they must be seen in context.

She said that the Trust provided healthcare across north, mid, and east Devon and has an annual budget of around £235 million.

She added claims could take years to settle so not all of the money paid out in a given year represented the claims made in the same year.

Dr Diamond said: "In recent years we have consistently ranked below the regional and national average in terms of legal claims received against NHS Trusts.

"While the number of claims against the trust has reduced steadily, the costs have increased.

The costs of clinical negligence claims are paid for by the NHS Litigation Authority not the local trust.

The Journal requested specific details for hospitals in North Devon but was told by the Trust that claims are made against it rather than specific hospitals so this data was not available.

The Trust was also unable to give out details of the nature of the compensation claims because it would reveal information "provided in confidence".

Source: northdevonjournal


£7.5 million compensation for girl, 8, who faces lifetime of disability after negligence during her birth at Stevenage’s Lister Hospital
£7.5 million compensation for girl, 8, who faces lifetime of disability after negligence during her birth at Stevenage’s Lister Hospital
Published 8th Mar 2016

An eight-year-old girl facing a lifetime of disability has won a care and rehabilitation package worth more than £7.5 million after an NHS trust admitted liability for hospital negligence during her birth.

The girl was starved of oxygen during her birth at Stevenage’s Lister Hospital in November 2007 and developed a brain injury as a result, which has left her visually impaired and with learning difficulties.

The £7.5m settlement from the East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, agreed just weeks before a quantum trial was due to take place to settle the matter, will pay for the specialist treatment and care the girl will require for the rest of her life.

A trust spokeswoman said yesterday: “The trust fully appreciates the distress to the girl and her family caused by her disabilities.

“While no financial award can properly recompense her or her family, it is hoped that the agreement approved today will ensure that she has access to the support and assistance she will require now and into the future.

“The trust would wish to repeat the apology it has previously made to the girl and her family, and will ensure that suitable lessons are learnt.”

 “We hope that lessons are learnt by the hospital and their staff so that patient safety in this situation can be improved and each and every patient receives the best quality of care at all times.”

Source: thecomet

Worcestershire Acute Trust ordered to make £8m payout to girl left paralysed after blunder
Worcestershire Acute Trust ordered to make £8m payout to girl left paralysed after blunder
Published 7th Mar 2016

 A teenage girl is set to receive £8 million in damages after blunders at a Worcester hospital left her facing a lifetime of devastating disability.

Shortly after she was born in 2003, medics at the Worcester Royal Hospital 'failed to diagnose and treat a malrotation of the small bowel', Mr Justice Stewart told London's High Court.

"A month after her birth she suffered an acute collapse," added the judge.

The hospital's 'negligence' caused a neurological injury which left her paralysed down her left-side.

She also lost part of her bowel and the ends of some of her fingers.

Now 13, she uses a wheelchair, is fed almost entirely by tube and requires ongoing vitamin supplements.

But despite all her difficulties she is 'doing well at school', said her barrister, William Latimer-Sayer QC.

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, which runs the hospital in Charles Hastings Way, admitted liability.

The trust agreed to a financial settlement which includes a lump sum of £3,171,260.

The girl will also receive index-linked and tax-free annual payments to cover the costs of her care for life.

These will start at £115,000-a-year until she turns 19, before rising to £152,000-a-year until she is 50 and then to £160,000-a-year for as long as she lives.

Mr Justice Stewart praised the girl's parents for how 'courageous they have been and how much love and care they have bestowed upon their daughter'.

The judge awarded them £200,000 from the total damages in recognition of their devoted care.

"I hope that this settlement will assist them and their daughter, so far as money can do so, to help them lead as happy and fulfilling a life as possible," he added.

Margaret Bowron QC, for the NHS trust, described the teenager as a 'splendid young lady' who had given a 'resourceful and frankly plucky response to everything life has thrown at her'.

Given the girl's age and vulnerability, the judge ordered that nothing must be published which might tend to identify her.

Source: kidderminstershuttle
NHS is ordered to speed up compensation payouts for families of stillborn babies
NHS is ordered to speed up compensation payouts for families of stillborn babies
Published 7th Mar 2016

Hospitals should automatically offer compensation to parents of babies left stillborn or brain-damaged due to poor care, an official review will recommend.

At the moment parents often have to fight for months or even years before the NHS agrees to compensation. Health bosses frequently deny liability until forced to do so by lawyers, and bereaved couples regularly say they have to call on solicitors to find out what went wrong.

Now Tory peer Baroness Cumberlege is expected to call for an independent scheme to investigate tragedies in childbirth, which would quickly decide whether compensation should be paid.

At the moment parents often have to fight for months or even years before the NHS agrees to compensation and have to call on lawyers to prove their claims. File image

She will recommend the investigations and any subsequent payouts are made on a ‘no fault’ basis, meaning that neither the hospital nor any individual doctor, midwife or nurse would have to admit blame, according to a source. It is hoped this will encourage individuals to come clean with the facts much quicker.

Tory peer Baroness Cumberlege is expected to call for an independent scheme to investigate tragedies in childbirth to quickly decide on compensation

An insider said: ‘It will recommend a faster system of investigation and learning and a “no blame” insurance option to allow families to get support and compensation without litigation.’

It will be based on a similar scheme in Sweden, the source added. In 2011, the Scottish Government announced it would be introducing a no-fault compensation scheme for the NHS there, but it has yet to come into force.

Source: dailymail

Hospital admit liability following tragic death of 15 year old Devon boy
Hospital admit liability following tragic death of 15 year old Devon boy
Published 2nd Mar 2016
An East Devon family’s three year battle for justice following the death of their son has finally
ended after a hospital admitted liability for his tragic death.
 
George Werb, from Colyton, was 15 when he “calmly and deliberately” walked in front of a train at
Seaton Junction, near Honiton, in 2013, having been released home from the Priory Hospital, in
Southampton, for the weekend, by his consultant, Dr Carlos Hoyos.
 
The hospital and Solent NHS Trust have now jointly admitted liability. George’s parents Joanne and
Justin Werb have spoken of their relief at the outcome of the report, but are still struggling to
come to terms with their tragic loss.
 
Mrs Werb said: “Like any parent would, we trusted the Priory and Dr Hoyos and so did George, and
that’s the worse part about this.
 
 “We shall always hold Dr Hoyos and NHS Solent responsible for the death of George. We have
never received an apology, but quite frankly a system that lets a 15 year boy down could never
write any words that could come near to being a comfort.
 
“Losing George because of a hospital’s failings is so unbearable to think about, and yet we hear of
more horror stories every day. When will the government take action to update our mental health
system and bring it in line with other successful divisions of the NHS?
 
She added: “I hope the findings of the Serious Case Review are implemented as this must never
happen to another family. Dealing with your child’s mental issues is hard enough, but to lose a
child because of failings in the system is beyond words”.
 
A two-day inquest into his death in 2013, which recorded a narrative verdict, heard evidence from
Dr Hoyos who said he believed that telling George he couldn’t go home would have “tipped him
into despair”.
 
The Werb’s filed a negligence claim based the hospital’s failure to adequately assess George’s
risk of suicide.
 
Source: exeterexpressandecho
  
NHS sets aside quarter of its budget for medical negligence claims
NHS sets aside quarter of its budget for medical negligence claims
Published 2nd Mar 2016

The NHS has set aside almost a quarter of the annual health budget to cover legal claims against the health service, it has emerged.

The NHS Litigation Authority which is responsible for indemnifying the service against legal action has set aside £26.1bn to cover its existing and future liabilities - almost one quarter of the £113bn annual health budget.

The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is now expected to unveil new plans to fine hospitals which are dishonest about medical mistakes.

Hospitals which are unable to demonstrate that they have been forthright about negligence cases will face sanctions of up to £100,000. 

Mr Hunt said: “Being open and learning from mistakes is crucial improving patient care. The NHS is a world class health service, but when mistakes happen it is vital that we face them head on and learn so they are never repeated.

“This sends a strong message that covering up mistakes will not be tolerated.”

In an interview with the Financial Times, former Lloyd’s of London insurance executive Michael Wade warned that the cost of NHS compensation is unsustainable.

Mr Wade is currently investigating the viability of public insurance schemes on the Government's behalf.

“How on earth is that affordable?,” he said, adding: “It's perfectly reasonable to raise the flag and say 'We need to sit down and think about this'.”

This is in fact misleading from the Government as last year around 1.3 billion was paid out therefore this represents 1% not 25% as the government has suggested – the figure the government are suggesting is with regard to future losses over many years not an annual cost and therefore is not a quarter as suggested in this article. What is being done is creative accounting to try and justify an attack on people brining claims against the very people who they should be able to trust and then cover up their failings after the event.

Source: telegraph

Boy brain damaged after birth at County Durham hospital receives £12m compensation
Boy brain damaged after birth at County Durham hospital receives £12m compensation
Published 2nd Mar 2016

A boy who will need lifetime care after suffering brain damage shortly after birth is to receive a compensation package worth £12 million.

Stephen Wootten developed low blood sugar after he was born at Bishop Auckland Hospital in County Durham in January 2004 and a failure to recognise he was feeding inadequately or give appropriate advice and treatment led to his injury.

Now 12, Stephen, who lives with his mother in Middlesex, has epilepsy, learning difficulties, memory issues and challenging behaviour.

He needs 24-hour care and the settlement approved at London’s High Court on Tuesday will allow the purchase of adapted accommodation and the support of two carers around the clock from adulthood.

The damages, which will be paid by the County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust, include a £3 million lump sum and lifelong annual payments.

Judge Martin McKenna praised the unstinting care shown by Stephen’s parents, Andrew and Stephanie.

Source: chroniclelive

‘Our baby paid with her life because of London hospital's failings’
‘Our baby paid with her life because of London hospital's failings’
Published 29th Feb 2016

The devastated parents of a baby girl who died hours after birth following a series of tragic errors by medics today demanded lessons should be learned ahead of an inquest.

Emily Radavicius was born with an infection and fighting for life at Chelsea and Westminster hospital when problems in her delivery are thought to have starved her of oxygen.

She needed resuscitation but did not respond and her parents — Gintare Degutiene, 34, and her boyfriend Linas Radavicius, 45, from Battersea — were advised to withdraw treatment.

“If they had done their job properly my daughter would have survived. 

“They found failures in the care I received. Our daughter paid with her life for them to learn something for the future.”

The hospital has apologised to Emily’s parents and admitted liability ahead of the inquest into her death due to open today at Westminster coroner’s court.

Miss Degutiene, a hotel supervisor, went into induced labour at 41 weeks on March 17 last year. 

There was a 14-hour delay in transferring her to the hospital’s labour ward, during which time neither she nor her baby were adequately monitored.

She said she and Mr Radavicius had spent nine hours in a waiting room and the baby’s heartbeat was not checked. When she was taken to the labour ward, she said baby Emily started to show signs of distress which were not acted upon and there were further avoidable delays in her delivery.

Miss Degutiene added: “They didn’t care about us... they just left us. We didn’t get the care we were supposed to receive. They said they had made some changes in the hospital after my situation. We have mixed emotions — it’s been almost a year and I just wish it to all be over so we can start another chapter.” 

Source: standard

Way to cut NHS legal bills is to learn from past mistakes
Way to cut NHS legal bills is to learn from past mistakes
Published 29th Feb 2016

The NHS brings hope, health, and life to millions of people, but on rare occasions it also fails and patients are injured, and families are bereaved.

To save some money for the NHS, the government plans to cut its legal bill for medical negligence compensation claims.

Although the public purse is indeed not bottomless, paying compensation is necessary while the NHS continues to cause unnecessary harm.

The government’s priority should be to ensure the NHS serves its purpose to help people.

When things go wrong which shouldn’t go wrong, injured patients and their families need guidance and legal representation.

The Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL), has some ideas for improvements to benefit both our beloved health service and its patients. The NHS must admit when it is wrong. Failure by the NHS to apologise is the most common complaint raised by patients in England and forces some people down the legal route in search of answers. A ‘deny, defend, delay’ tactic is used all too often, and drags legal cases out unnecessarily.

Obtaining medical records as part of a medical negligence claims can take up to six months when official guidelines state they should be released within 21 days.

Patients and their lawyers do not have time to waste.

Quicker recovery of records would reduce a lot of work, uncertainty, and the negative knock-on effect such delays have on costs.

But the easiest and most effective way to cut the NHS’s legal bill is for it to learn from its own failures and stop repeating harm. Each claim the NHS has to pay compensation for represents a person who was injured unnecessarily and who needs to get their life back on track.

Source: oxfordmail

Toddler loses eye after doctors take 18 months to diagnose rare cancer
Toddler loses eye after doctors take 18 months to diagnose rare cancer
Published 29th Feb 2016

A toddler lost an eye after doctors took 18 months to diagnose a rare form of cancer.

Stephanie Beasley, from Tamworth, first raised concerns about her daughter Ezmai’s eyesight when she was nine months old.

But it wasn’t until she was aged two that doctors eventually told her devastated family she had a tumour in the eye - which would have to be removed.

Ms Beasley, 25, is now backing a campaign by the Childhood Eye Cancer Trust to get a faster diagnosis for retinoblastoma, a rare form of cancer.

The charity said that 21 per cent of children with retinoblastoma are waiting six months or longer for a diagnosis, reports the Birmingham Mail.

Around 50 to 60 children are diagnosed each year in the UK and almost all will survive, but sadly some lose their eyes to the cancer.

Ms Beasley said she first raised concerns when her daughter was nine months old.

“Ezmai had a lazy eye and we spoke to a health visitor and then took her to the pre-school vision team but they told me to come back in six months.

"I kept taking her but they couldn’t find anything wrong,” she said.

“My instincts told me there was something wrong with Ezmai but I felt no-one believed me and that I was going mad.

“We eventually got referred to Birmingham Children’s Hospital and it was there that we were told Ezmai had a tumour in her eye.

“We’ve since learned that she was probably blind in one eye for a year but as she was so young, we didn’t realise.”

Ezmai had the lifesaving surgery to remove her eye in October last year and now wears an artificial eye.

Ms Beasley said: “Ezmai has bounced back amazingly and coped so well with everything that has been thrown at her.

 “She is very energetic and outgoing and she enjoys playing with anything and everything.

 “The operation hasn’t changed her one bit. Of course, she was groggy when she first came around but the very next day she was having fun in the hospital playroom as if nothing had happened.”

Source:mirror


Wife, 47, died last August from cancer that went undetected despite 58 medical appointments in five months
Wife, 47, died last August from cancer that went undetected despite 58 medical appointments in five months
Published 25th Feb 2016

David Scully, 47, watched his wife Jeanette suffer in excruciating pain for more than five months as doctors struggled to identify what was wrong.

Then, in May last year, Mrs Scully, also 47, was diagnosed with a rare tumour that had taken over her uterus and spread through her abdomen. She died just a few months later.

He also believes their ten-year-old pet dog was aware of Mrs Scully's illness months before she was diagnosed and would constantly sniff at her stomach.

He said: 'Ever since Jeanette died Jerry has cried and whimpered every night. I have to wake him up and say "calm down, son". 

'I have videos of Jeanette on my phone, and there is one where she calls Jerry's name. I was watching it a few weeks ago and he ran in with his ears pricked. He misses her so much. We both do.' 

Mrs Scully, from Sunderland, had been examined for abdominal pain since 2012, She was also suffering from back, hip and thigh pain and rectal bleeding, later dismissed as constipation.

But, by the time the cause of her suffering was discovered in May last year, it was too late to operate. She died five months later.

The couple, who had been together 22 years, married at Sunderland Royal Hospital four weeks before her death in a wedding ceremony arranged by cancer charity Macmillan.

At the time, Mr Scully knew his wife had a matter of days to live, but she was unaware of how quickly she would succumb to her condition. 

Mr Scully, a former doorman, said: 'Jeanette was my entire life. It was me, Jeanette and Jerry.

'We never had children but we had Jerry ever since he was a puppy. Jeanette bought him off a friend more than ten years ago and he was like her child. 

'He was there in the hospice when she passed away. He was sitting at the bottom of the bed.'

Source: dailymail

Widow sues Luton & Dunstable Hospital over her husband’s swab death
Widow sues Luton & Dunstable Hospital over her husband’s swab death
Published 25th Feb 2016
A heartbroken widow is taking legal action against Luton & Dunstable Hospital after it was found
that doctors had left a swab in her husband for 13 years.
 
Shortly before his death in 2014, scans revealed that Frank Hibbard had a swab around his pelvic
region– which had been there since a prostate operation at the L&D 13 years earlier.
 
A mass attached to it had calcified, grown around veins and had increased to the size of a melon,
pressing on his rectum and bowel.
 
At that point Mr Hibbard, 69, was also found to have multiple cancers but he died before an
operation to remove the mass could be carried out.
 
The swab left the lorry driver in constant pain prior to his death, his widow Christine has said.
 
The L&D has admitted fault over the error in 2001 and has apologised that the swab was also
missed on a CT scan two years later.
 
Mrs Hibbard said: “I feel angry.
 
“Angry firstly that a swab was left behind following his operation in 2001, and then that it was
missed on a scan a year later.
 
“All those years he lived with a swab inside him, I just feel the health system badly let him down.
 
“In my view the poor treatment left him in agony and had a massive impact on his health.
 
“I am so angry and always will be.”
 
He left behind two children and four grandchildren.
 
An inquest into Mr Hibbard’s death will take place in Ampthill on March 7.
 
Source: dunstabletoday
Serious investigation launched after patient dies after falling at Colchester General Hospital
Serious investigation launched after patient dies after falling at Colchester General Hospital
Published 24th Feb 2016
A patient who died after falling over in Colchester General Hospital hadn't undergone a "falls risk
assessment" beforehand.
 
A serious incident investigation has now been launched by the troubled trust running the hospital.
 
The 95-year-old man from Clacton had an unwitnessed fall on the surgical ward two days after
being admitted there.
 
The incident only came to light after the fall was recorded in public documents, which will be
discussed at the hospital trust's board of directors meeting tomorrow.
 
The report in the papers states: “There were three serious harm falls in January including one
death, bringing the total to 22 for the year to date.
 
"The patient who died suffered a subdural haemorrhage.” [severe head injury] “With the increase
in admitted-with injuries, it is essential that care is documented. There have been 84 fewer falls in
the year to end January 2016 compared to the same period last year and two fewer serious harm
falls. "Preliminary enquiries have not been able to find evidence of a falls risk assessment for the
gentleman who died.”
 
A spokesman for Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust said it happened earlier this
month and the man died a few days after the fall.
 
He said: "There is also a suggestion that he had a fall before coming to this hospital.
 
"The Trust is treating this as a serious incident and our investigation is being led by an A&E
consultant and a falls prevention practitioner.
 
"We have been in touch with this man’s relatives to say that we are conducting a review of his
care."
 
He added that because the investigation is ongoing, the trust could not comment further at this
stage.
 
Source: gazette
 
 
Man left in wheelchair after botched treatment at the RD&E battles for more than £3m compensation
Man left in wheelchair after botched treatment at the RD&E battles for more than £3m compensation
Published 24th Feb 2016
A man left in a wheelchair for life after botched spinal treatment at the Royal Devon and Exeter
Hospital is now battling for more than £3 million in compensation.
 
However, in a unique test case, NHS lawyers say most of the costs of caring for him result from his
drug addiction - and he only has himself to blame for that.
 
London's High Court heard NHS bosses accept there was a negligent failure to promptly diagnose
and treat the man's spinal abscess in 2009.
 
The result of that was permanent paralysis from the chest downwards, said his barrister,
Christopher Wilson-Smith QC.
 
He now needs specialised accommodation and round the clock care and his legal team have
valued his claim at up to £3.4 million.
 
The court heard the man, now in his 50s but who cannot be named for legal reasons, has been a
drug addict since he was just 15.
 
He has been dependent on amphetamines, methadone, heroin, cocaine and even prescription
drugs, said Mr Wilson-Smith.
 
The QC added that he has been "frequently in trouble with the police" over the years and has
served several prison sentences.
 
Even since his confinement to a wheelchair, he had continued his "chaotic" lifestyle.
 
"It would be quite wrong to deny him the compensation necessary to manage his spinal injury",
the QC added.
 
In light of the man's acute vulnerability, the judge ordered that nothing must be published which
might tend to identify him.
 
Source: exeterexpressandecho
  
Teenage hairdresser lost her leg after doctors dismissed her melon-like tumour 24 times
Teenage hairdresser lost her leg after doctors dismissed her melon-like tumour 24 times
Published 23rd Feb 2016

A hairdresser has become an amputee after a melon-sized tumour destroyed her leg - despite visiting doctors 24 times in agonising pain.

Natalie Turner, 19, was diagnosed with a rare form of bone cancer in November 2014 - more than a year after she first visited her GP.

Natalie, from Portsmouth, Hampshire, initially thought the throbbing she felt in her legs was because she was on her feet all day - and even after her leg swelled to more than twice its normal size, she claims doctors refused to send her for a scan.

But amazingly, it took more than 24 appointments before she finally had an MRI scan - where medics revealed she was suffering from Ewing's Sarcoma.

By the time she was diagnosed the tumour in her leg had grown so large that she needed a lower leg amputation in a bid to save her life - and the cancerous tumour was the same size as a melon.

The aggressive cancer had already spread to her lungs and groin so she also needed several rounds of chemotherapy.

Now five-months later, Natalie is in remission and sharing her story to raise awareness for the symptoms so other sufferers aren't ignored.

A spokesperson for Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust said: "Whilst we cannot comment on an individual's personal circumstances due to patient confidentiality, we can confirm that this case was fully investigated.

Source: mirror

Woman who lost her nose to aggressive cancer receives £900,000 payout from NHS
Woman who lost her nose to aggressive cancer receives £900,000 payout from NHS
Published 23rd Feb 2016

A woman who lost her nose when her aggressive mouth cancer went undiagnosed has received a £900,000 payout.

Andrea McNicholas, 49, was diagnosed with the disease – by then in its latest stage – in July 2011 after complaining of symptoms including having a hole in her palate which wouldn't heal for more than a year.

In November of the same year, she underwent a gruelling 20-hour operation, in which her neck was dissected, and her nose and part of her jaw were removed .In the wake of the surgery, Andrea, of Wigan in Lancashire, has been left with irreparable damage to her face.

She's likely to be fed through a tube for the rest of her life, has difficulty breathing and swallowing, and her self-esteem is so shattered that she barely leaves the house.

Now, following a four year investigation, she has been awarded £900,000 in an out-of-court settlement after Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust admitted liability.

"This has had a dramatic affect on my mental health, as I'm constantly stuck indoors and feel as though I am unable to live my life," said Andrea.

"I don't leave the house unless it is for appointments as I get tired very quickly. I am also extremely paranoid about the way I look. I feel as though everyone stares at me, regardless as to whether I wear big glasses or cover the majority of my face.

"I'm not the person I once was, in respect of my appearance or my personality.

"I sometimes think, 'What's the point in actually being here, when I cannot do normal, every day things, which most people take for granted?' I just long to be normal - and I am unsure if I will ever reach that point again."

A spokesperson from Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust said: “The trust deeply regrets the shortcomings identified in the care provided and accepted full responsibility for the delay in diagnosis of cancer and expressed its unreserved apologies to Ms McNicholas.

"Legal representatives for Ms McNicholas and the trust have worked to agree an appropriate settlement to provide for Ms McNicholas’ needs now and into the future. The trust appreciates that money can never fully compensate for the pain and suffering Ms McNicholas has had to endure and would like to pay tribute to the strength she has shown throughout such difficult times.

"Steps have been taken to implement changes aimed at preventing this from happening again.”

Source: mirror

Dozens win compensation from NHS for losing testicles
Dozens win compensation from NHS for losing testicles
Published 23rd Feb 2016

In most cases a delay in correctly diagnosing a man’s illness left surgeons with no option but to cut off a testicle that could have been saved.

But in several horrifying cases, doctors removed the wrong testicle and then had to operate again to remove the other one when the mistake was discovered – leaving the patient with no testicles.

The NHS typically pays out about £20,000 when it admits it is at fault for leaving men as monorchids, the term for having just one testicle. But payments for removing a man’s only healthy testicle in a surgical mix-up can be about £70,000 as the individual is compensated for being left infertile.

Often the compensation figure includes a sum to pay for cosmetic surgery to provide the men with a false testicle. Figures from the National Health Service Litigation Authority (NHSLA) show 78 successful cases have been brought in the last four years.

A total of £1.7million was paid out in those cases, meaning the average sum was about £22,000. In 2013, a 48-year-old company boss took legal action against Salisbury District Hospital after he had a healthy testicle removed by mistake.

He went into theatre expecting a cancerous testicle to be removed but 40 minutes after the operation a doctor realised the blunder. The healthy testicle was then frozen while a plastic surgeon was rushed in and tried to undo the damage. between £20,000 and £70,000 for the mistake

The man said: “It seems I can no longer father children. I have gone through incredible stress and strain.”

Joyce Robins, co-director of Patient Concern, said: “It is beyond belief that medics could be so careless. Just £20,000 sounds as if the NHS and therefore taxpayers are getting a bargain when such a mistake may ruin the rest of a man’s life.”

Source: dailystar

ed full responsibility for the delay in diagnosis of cancer and expressed its unreserved apologies to Ms McNicholas.

 

"Legal representatives for Ms McNicholas and the trust have worked to agree an appropriate settlement to provide for Ms McNicholas’ needs now and into the future. The trust appreciates that money can never fully compensate for the pain and suffering Ms McNicholas has had to endure and would like to pay tribute to the strength she has shown throughout such difficult times.

"Steps have been taken to implement changes aimed at preventing this from happening again.”

Source: mirror

Sharp rise in negligence claims against practice nurses, says MDU
Sharp rise in negligence claims against practice nurses, says MDU
Published 22nd Feb 2016

The number of clinical negligence claims against practice nurses have risen sharply over 

the past decade, according to the Medical Defence Union (MDU).

 

Only two nurse practitioner members reported clinical negligence claims to the MDU in 

2005 but climbed to 25 in 2015, the medical indemnity provider said.

 

MDU found that wrong or delayed diagnosis was the most common issue featured, 

featuring in 40% of claims and 30% of complaints. Other common reasons included 

delayed referrals and prescribing errors.

 

MDU medico-legal adviser Dr Beverley Ward said the rise may be linked to practice 

nurses taking on a wider clinical responsibility.

 

She said: ‘Many practices have devolved more responsibility to nurse practitioners in their team to cope with the increasing demand.

 

’However, in taking on roles such as assessing and diagnosing patients, prescribing 

medicines, and running minor injury clinics, nurse practitioners are also at an increased 

risk of patients holding them individually accountable if something goes wrong.’

 

The MDU could not provide figures on how the total number of nurse practitioner 

members had developed over the ten-year period.

 

Source: pulsetoday

 

Northampton parents call for change in the law after being denied independent inquest as baby son was ruled stillborn
Northampton parents call for change in the law after being denied independent inquest as baby son was ruled stillborn
Published 22nd Feb 2016

A couple from Northampton were forced to sue a hospital for negligence over the death 

of their son so the tragedy could be investigated independently.

 

Louie Buckley died about 30 minutes after his birth at NGH, which the hospital has only 

recently admitted liability four years later.

 

However, he was classified as stillborn, which means his death did not have to be 

reported to the coroner for an inquest.

 

As a result, parents Michelle Hemmington and Paul Buckley were left with no 

independent review of what happened - only NGH’s own internal investigation.

 

Michelle said: “We weren’t happy with the hospital investigating its own staff. It needs to 

be independent, but we weren’t allowed to have that.

 

“Any other death at a hospital would have been referred to the coroner, but stillbirths 

are not”

 

Michelle and Paul are now calling for every stillbirth from 37 weeks gestation that 

happens during labour to be referred to the coroner.

 

That way, a coroner can examine the facts objectively and, if necessary, hold an inquest, 

which can result in an order made to the hospital to prevent future deaths.

 

Michelle said “You can’t have a child die unexpectedly and be able to say: ‘It was just one 

of those things.’”

 

NGH finally admitted it was negligent last month, and was forced to pay damages, but 

only after four years of ongoing litigation

 

The hospital has admitted 19 separate failings which led to Louie being stillborn - a 

classification the couple still dispute.

 

However a spokesman for NGH said yesterday that the trust now admitted Louie’s life 

could have been saved.

 

He said “Every still birth is a deep tragedy for the family and all concerned. We have 

admitted that Louie should have been delivered sooner than he was and, had that 

happened, he would have been born alive.

 

“A very detailed internal investigation was undertaken and the circumstances surrounding Louie’s birth were also extensively examined by external experts, including an obstetrician and midwife.

 

“All the learning from those investigations has been implemented, leading to significant 

changes and improvements in our maternity services.”

 

Source: northamptonchron

HRI
HRI "admits" fault in Huddersfield pensioner's death
Published 22nd Feb 2016

Family of Jeanne Summers who died after a fall at Huddersfield Royal Infirmary - Husband 

Albert with daughter Jayne and son Graham

 

Huddersfield Royal Infirmary bosses have accepted a share of the blame in a woman’s 

untimely death.

 

Mum of four, Jeanne Summers, 78, slipped and fell in a hospital toilet cubicle in 2013, 

badly breaking her ankle.

 

The frail pensioner from Dalton had not been supervised inside the cubicle and fell as she 

was only wearing socks on the slippy tiled floor.

 

An official probe concluded the incident contributed to her death ten days later.

 

The infirmary was issued a so-called Regulation 28 warning by West Yorkshire Coroner’s Court in a bid to prevent future incidents.

 

But Mrs Summers’ grieving husband Albert and daughter Jayne took their own legal action and told the Examiner that the hospital had failed to investigate the incident properly or 

communicate what was going on.

 

After more than two years of wrangling, the family has now revealed the dispute has been 

settled.

 

The NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA), which handles negligence claims for hospitals, has admitted a number of mistakes were made by hospital staff.

 

A letter from the NHSLA, seen by the Examiner, reveals the infirmary made errors with 

Mrs Summers’ care and its assessment of her likelihood to fall.

 

The family has received some compensation.

 

Source: examiner

Botched Vanguard eye surgeries at Musgrove Park Hospital costing taxpayers tens of thousands of pounds
Botched Vanguard eye surgeries at Musgrove Park Hospital costing taxpayers tens of thousands of pounds
Published 22nd Feb 2016
Botched eye surgeries carried out by a private company at Musgrove Park 
Hospital in Taunton are costing taxpayers tens of thousands of pounds, it has 
been revealed.

In 2014, cataract surgeries at the hospital were terminated after only four days, 
following concerns from NHS staff.

Complications reported by patients were 10 times the number that might have 
been expected.

Out of 62 operations carried out, 31 patients had suffered problems and one man 
was even left blind in one eye.

The operations were carried out by private healthcare firm Vanguard Healthcare 
Solutions, which had been appointed by the trust to help clear a backlog.

Vanguard then sub-contracted part of the contract to another company, The 
Practice, who then further sub-contracted to Kestrel Ophthalmics.

The contract, rumoured to be worth £320,000, should have seen 400 operations 
carried out.

An internal investigation was carried out by the hospital into what went wrong, but 
Musgrove refused to publish it for fear of being sued for defamation.

The NHS is now paying out for compensation claims and there is no indication 
that it will be able to recoup the damages paid from Vanguard

Michael Newcombe, 84, lost his sight following the surgery. He later underwent 
successful surgery to remove the cataract in his left eye, thanks to Musgrove’s 
own consultants.

He has also had surgery to reduce the discomfort in the injured eye, but he 
remains functionally blind in that eye.

Now, he is being paid “substantial” damages, running into tens of thousands of 
pounds, for his ordeal.

But the damages are being paid by the NHS, not the companies involved.

Source: somersetcountygazette
'Shortcomings' in care of woman, 85, before she died
'Shortcomings' in care of woman, 85, before she died
Published 22nd Feb 2016
A coroner is writing to a Welsh health board after ruling there were shortcomings 
in the care of an 85-year-old Carmarthenshire woman.

Margaret Hiorns died from a blood clot at Llanelli's Prince Phillip Hospital in 2013, 
after originally being treated for a chest infection.

Her son claimed she had been given blood-thinning drugs for too long.

The hospital's health board said it had reviewed Mrs Hiorns's care and rejected 
some allegations from the family.

But recording a narrative verdict on the death, Coroner Mark Layton said he would 
write to the chief executive of the Hywel Dda University Health Board to reiterate 
the importance of monitoring patients and consider the issue of prescribing the 
drug Tinzarapin.

Mrs Hiorn had been given the anti-coagulant drug while being treated at Glangwili 
Hospital in Carmarthen, where she had been admitted for a chest infection two 
months before she died.

Her son Mike Hiorns told the inquest that she was given the drug for too long and 
was not properly monitored for potential complications, including internal bleeding.

He described her as being in severe agonising pain.

"The cause of her death was accelerated by the mismanagement of her care," he 
alleged.

Margaret Hiorns was admitted to Glangwili Hospital in Carmarthen two months 
before she died

Expert witness Dr Edmunud Anthony Bliss told the coroner in a report that there 
had been an "element of substandard care" but not negligence.

Nursing expert Joanna James agreed that care in July 2013 at Glangwili had 
"contributed to the general deterioration in her condition".

Delivering his narrative verdict, Mr Layton said there had been "shortcomings in 
the management of her care at Glangwili Hospital".

Responding following the inquest, the health board said it accepted there had 
been issues in care at Glangwili and said it "sincerely apologises" for those 
matters.

Source: bbc
Mother, 60, with restless legs syndrome was 'driven insane' by schizophrenia drug error
Mother, 60, with restless legs syndrome was 'driven insane' by schizophrenia drug error
Published 22nd Feb 2016
A mother with restless leg syndrome thought she was going 'insane' after 
mistakenly taking drugs to treat schizophrenia for over a month after a pharmacy 
handed her the wrong prescription.

Henryka Barszczowska, 60, was given anti-psychotic drug risperidone which she 
took over a five-week period last September and October.

Mrs Barszczowska, from Roundhay, West Yorkshire, took 83 out of the 84 pack 
of tablets mistakenly thinking they were ropinirole - her prescribed drug for her 
restless leg syndrome.

But her daughter, Ewa Zylowska, 28, said that alarm bells rang when her mother 
gradually become more tired and often slept all day and remained awake all night.

Henryka Barszczowska who thought she was going 'insane' after a pharmacy 
mistakenly gave her drugs used to treat schizophrenia

Henryka Barszczowska who thought she was going 'insane' after a pharmacy 
mistakenly gave her drugs used to treat schizophrenia

Mrs Zylowska said: 'She felt something was wrong with her and she thought she 
was going insane.

'On one night she came to me in tears, really frustrated, saying she was getting 
worse and feeling so unwell.'

However, Mrs Zylowska said that everything became clear when she looked at 
her mother's medication and realised she had been taking the wrong tablets.

'When I looked at the packet I realised straight away they were the wrong tablets. 
I was so shocked and disgusted.

'I looked on the Internet and found they were anti-psychotic drugs.'

She then contacted the pharmacy, who advised Barszczowska to stop taking the 
drugs immediately and contact her GP.

Over the next three months, Mrs Zylowska says her mother experienced shakes, 
muscle pains, and anxiety.

Michael Manning, of M Manning Pharmacy, said: 'We at Manning Pharmacy strive 
to provide an excellent pharmacy service and follow standard operating 
procedures.

'We are sorry that an error occurred in the dispensing of Mrs Barszczowska's 
prescription on 15 September 2015.

Source: dailymail
NHS staff told to say 'I am sorry' to patients for medical blunders
NHS staff told to say 'I am sorry' to patients for medical blunders
Published 15th Feb 2016

Doctors, nurses and midwives will have to offer patients face-to-face apologies and say they are personally sorry about medical blunders under tough new rules designed to make the NHS more honest.

The 920,000 members of those three professions must now offer a prompt and heartfelt apology and explanation to the patient when things go wrong under new guidance being published on Monday.

It applies to all the UK’s 234,000 doctors and 686,000 nurses and midwives. The guidance should mean that those injured by mistakes during treatment, such as being given the wrong drug, are told immediately what happened and what harm they have suffered or may suffer as a result.

The General Medical Council (GMC), which regulates doctors, and the Nursing and Midwifery Council think that genuine, personal apologies will help patients overcome their anxiety and distress.

“Patients are likely to find it more meaningful if you offer a personalised apology – for example ‘I am sorry …’ – rather than a general expression of regret about the incident on the organisation’s behalf,” says the guidance, which was prompted by the Mid Staffordshire care scandal.

“Saying ‘I am sorry’ is intuitive. You want to avoid saying, for example, ‘my trust regrets’ or ‘the organisation that I work for regrets’. These could be seen by patients as slightly weasel words. They want a personal apology and for the doctor or the team to show genuine contrition,” said Professor Terence Stephenson, an eminent paediatrician who is the GMC’s chairman.

Peter Walsh, chief executive of the charity Action against Medical Accidents (AvMA), said some doctors, nurses and midwives had ignored advice from professional bodies to be open and honest.

“Most doctors and nurses have always done the right thing but some lack the awareness and skills to do it well and compassionately. Some have justified not being open because of fear of adverse consequences for them or their employer, such as litigation. In effect the system as a whole has frowned upon cover-ups but been prepared to tolerate them,” he said.

“At AvMA all too many times we have seen the devastating effect that cover-ups have on patients and their families. Sometimes the trauma is more harmful than the original mistake. It drives people to take legal or disciplinary action to achieve some accountability and learning to prevent the same thing happening to others.”

C&S Solicitors see time and time again where matters are covered up and fault not accepted only for a claim process to have the desired effect of obtaining the apology required. We have seen the NHS not resuscitate patients without the families permission and hook them up to the wrong lines giving them air instead of oxygen leading to death. Even in these extreme examples no apology has been forthcoming without legal action being instigated. There is a culture of cover and fear and many staff will not challenge any opinion or action put forward by someone in a more senior position this leaves continual problems and only when this has been removed will an honest and open NHS be there which can be accountable.
 

When a claim is instigated records are requested however each consultant signs off his or her part for these and amazingly the most important records are quite often missing!! The investigation that is carried out internally in to an incident is also quite often missing!! This closed shop defensive mentality needs to be changed or this will be just more government rhetoric with little affect. 

Source: theguardian

Nearly 800 negligence and injury claims in north Wales
Nearly 800 negligence and injury claims in north Wales
Published 15th Feb 2016

There are 790 open clinical negligence and personal injury claims against north Wales' health board, a report has said.

If all the claims were paid in full the sum would total more than £90m, according to the report to Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board.

Of those claims, 670 are for clinical negligence and 120 for personal injury.

The board said all incidents were carefully reviewed to help prevent similar incidents in the future.

Of the 670 clinical cases, 82 are classed as "certain" to be settled, and if paid in full could cost up to £64.9m in costs and damages.

Nine of the claims were valued at more than £1m, the largest being £9.6m in a case where a baby suffered a brain injury due to a delay in delivery. Seven of the nine cases relate to problems with births and pregnancies.

There were 37 claims classed as "probable", with a total of £24.9m involved.

One claim for clinical negligence involved a patient who fell at home but x-rays showed no fracture of her knee, despite her being unable to stand up. It was not until four weeks later she was found to have a fractured femur.

In another case, a patient who had a knee replacement in 2009 was still in pain four months later, and the problem was found to lie with the instruments used. The manufacturers have since redesigned the instruments.

The health board's liability is limited to £25,000 in each case, the remainder being met from Welsh Risk Pool insurance - the central fund used by all health services in Wales.

Source: BBC

Mother left in 'excruciating pain' during C-section is awarded £27,000 for not being given enough pain relief
Mother left in 'excruciating pain' during C-section is awarded £27,000 for not being given enough pain relief
Published 15th Feb 2016

A woman has been awarded £27,000 after a hospital began a Caesarean without giving her adequate pain relief - leaving her in 'excruciating pain' and suffering post-traumatic stress disorder.

Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust paid the sum after admitting the unidentified patient was not given enough anaesthetic when surgeons at Queen Elizabeth Hospital cut her open to deliver her first child.

She had been admitted to hospital in labour in January 2013 and given an epidural.

But after nearly two hours of active pushing and two attempts at assisted delivery, a decision was taken to carry out a Caesarean.

The unidentified woman was admitted to Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Woolwich, where she was given insufficient pain relief during the birth of her first child, leaving her in agony

Investigations into this case revealed the patient's epidural was removed shortly after she arrived in theatre, as it was not working well.

Patients in this situation would normally be given a spinal anaesthetic.

But investigations revealed no record of the woman consenting to such a procedure, or any record of her receiving one. 

This suggests she may not given any additional anaesthetic before surgery started - or received an insufficient amount. 

Indeed, when the operation began, the woman felt excruciating pain from the surgeon's knife. 

Only then was she given more pain relief -  a cocktail of analgesic drugs including fentanyl, ketamine and midazolam.

Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust admitted several allegations including a failure to provide adequate pain relief, failure to inform the patient of the removal of her epidural and poor record-keeping. 

A spokesperson for the Trust said: 'We cannot comment on the details of this incident as it occurred before Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust was formed (in October 2013), although we offer our sympathies to the person involved. 

'We are pleased that a settlement has been reached.' 

Source: dailymail

Baby born in TOILET after mum sent home from hospital 'died of sepsis because he was not given antibiotics'
Baby born in TOILET after mum sent home from hospital 'died of sepsis because he was not given antibiotics'
Published 11th Feb 2016

A baby born in the toilet after his mother was sent home from hospital, died of sepsis because he was not given the right medication, an inquest heard.

Hayley Jermyn gave birth to Charlie while sitting on the loo hours after she was told she was told she was not advanced enough in labour to stay in hospital.

Experts say warning signs that Charlie had developed infection Strep A were later ignored by a midwife at the house.

Despite desperate efforts to revive Charlie through CPR, the tiny baby died last May, just 30 hours after his birth.

Grieving parents Mark, 44, and Hayley, 36, of Penryn, Cornwall, said errors in their son's medical care were directly responsible for his death.

Microbiologist Dr James Gray said: "He would probably have survived if he had been born in hospital and had access to treatment."

Dr Gray also said that a midwife had examined him when he was showing possible signs of illness shortly after his birth, but he had not been sent to hospital for treatment.

He said the midwife heard Charlie making grunting noises twelve hours after he was born and he described this as a "red flag indicator of sepsis where you really need to do something quickly."

Dr Gray said: "Grunting for hours after birth is a red flag and he should have been seen too. He should have been seen by a paediatrician and given antibiotics."

Source: mirror

Betsi Cadwaladr faces £90m medical negligence bill
Betsi Cadwaladr faces £90m medical negligence bill
Published 11th Feb 2016

The largest payout is valued at £9.6m and there are nine claims which exceed £1m each

More than £90 million in clinical negligence claims is expected to be paid out in North Wales over the next couple of years.

The staggering sum is revealed in a report to this week’s meeting of the Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board by director of corporate services Chris Wright.

There are currently 790 claims against the board which are open - 670 for clinical negligence and 120 for personal injury.

Of the 670 expected to be settled before next year, 82 are classed as “certain”, with a total of sum of £64.9m involved in damages, claimant costs and defence costs.

Nine of the claims are valued at over £1m, the largest individual sum being £9.6m in a case where brain injury was caused due to a delay in delivery. In four of the other cases where £1m is likely to be paid delivery problems led to cerebral palsy.

Thirty-seven claims are categorised as “probable”, with a total sum of £24.9m involved, the largest individual amount again being £8.7m for a birth injury.

The west, central and east areas of the board each has one claim with an estimated settlement of over £1m.

One claim for clinical negligence involved a patient who fell at home but X-rays showed no fracture of her knee despite her being unable to stand up. It was not until four weeks later that she was found to have a fractured femur.

Following the incident a memo was sent to all doctors in accident and emergency departments reminding them to examine the hips of all patients who fall and who cannot bear weight.

In another case a patient who had a total knee replacement in 2009 was still in pain four months later, and the problem was found to lie with the instruments used to insert the prosthesis. The manufacturers have since redesigned the instruments.

Of the personal injury claims 19 are classed as “certain”, with a total value of £1,075,103 and the highest claim – in the central area – at £656,000. Another 12 claims are classed as “probable”, with a value of £310,725.

Source: dailypost

Patient given wrong insulin in potentially fatal 'never event' blunder
Patient given wrong insulin in potentially fatal 'never event' blunder
Published 11th Feb 2016

Health officials are investigating a potentially fatal blunder in which a patient was given the wrong insulin.

It happened at an unnamed health centre in Wrexham during August.

It is one of four separate “Never Events” reported to North Wales health bosses this year.

According to the NHS, such incidents have the potential to cause serious patient harm or even death.

They are supposed to be “wholly preventable” due to strict guidance and safety recommendations that should be implemented by all health care providers.

A quality and performance report, which will be discussed by BCUHB members next week, also gave details of other “Never Events”.

In July, a swab used during a surgical procedure at Ysbyty Glan Clwyd went missing prompting fears it may have been left inside the patient.

An x-ray was carried out but nothing was found.

Staff shortages at secure unit where Llanberis vicar killer absconded from

A month earlier, surgeons operated on the wrong knee of a patient at Wrexham Maelor Hospital .

This individual has since attended follow up appointments and according to the report is now “pain free”.

Shadow Health Minister Darren Millar says “Never Events” should be just that.

He said: “They should never take place.

“Written evidence of these incidents will clearly be questioned by communities across North Wales, where the health board is already under intense scrutiny and where faith in NHS bosses is at an all-time low.

“Where there are mistakes and failures in care, they must be handled transparently and put right urgently.

Source: dailypost

‘’Operation left me in constant pain’’
‘’Operation left me in constant pain’’
Published 10th Feb 2016

A dad plans to take his fight against NHS Tayside to the European Court of Human Rights, claiming medical negligence after a hip operation has left him in constant pain.

Barry Leal, 37, had the operation in 2002 after suffering from Perthes disease as a child, a condition which causes deterioration of the hip joints.

He claims that the full hip replacement operation left him unable to work for 10 years, and says that despite there being a note of “nerve damage” listed on his medical records, he has never been officially told by a doctor.

After being prescribed a different painkiller in 2012, Barry managed to return to work, and is now employed as a postman by Royal Mail.

However, he says that the operation robbed him of 10 years of his life and the chance of following his dream of working in the oil industry.

Barry, who is married with five children, has claimed that during the surgery doctors damaged his femoral nerve.

He added: “I kept telling them at appointments that I was in agony, but they would say, ‘we don’t know what’s wrong’.

“At one of my post-op appointments, the doctor who did the hip replacement even said to me, ‘why are you still limping? I fixed that’.

“The doctor lengthened my leg without my consent or knowledge; this has now had a massive adverse effect by pushing my pelvis up into my spine and knocking it out of alignment, which has caused multiple bulging discs in my lower back and neck and has been very painful.

“My neurologist said it’s amazing I’m able to work with everything I’ve been put through. In November 2013, my neurologist said to me ‘your nerve problem happened at time of surgery’.

“In my medical file, it mentions nerve damage but not once did anyone tell me, and this was 11 years later it was finally mentioned to me.”

An NHS Tayside spokeswoman said: “Mr Leal submitted a formal complaint to NHS Tayside which was fully investigated and responded to in 2014. Due to patient confidentiality, we are unable to comment further.”

Source: eveningtelegraph

Rochester patient Sandra Wood died after Tunbridge Wells Hospital failed to diagnose her and perform CT scan, inquest hears
Rochester patient Sandra Wood died after Tunbridge Wells Hospital failed to diagnose her and perform CT scan, inquest hears
Published 10th Feb 2016

The death of a patient - who was denied a CT scan because it was the weekend - occurred after hospital failings, an inquest has heard.

Sandra Wood was 69 when she died at Maidstone Hospital on April 18 last year from a bowel obstruction.

She had been taken to Tunbridge Wells Hospital two days earlier after she began vomiting a brown fluid.

Today, an inquest at Gravesend Old Town Hall heard she died of natural causes as a consequence of the failure by the Tunbridge Wells Hospital to correctly diagnose and treat her.

When Miss Wood, a retired shop assistant from Rochester, was seen at Tunbridge Wells Hospital on April 17, she was initially discharged with a diagnosis of constipation and a urinary tract infection.

She was sent home with paracetamol.

But the following day, she was found collapsed on her bathroom floor by her son. The inquest heard she could not speak and an ambulance was called.

A doctor at Tunbridge Wells Hospital requested a CT scan to rule out bowel tumours or abnormalities but explained it could not be carried out until April 19 due to the fact it was a weekend.

CT scans, the inquest heard, could only be carried out during emergency investigations.

After being discharged, Mrs Wood suffered a cardiac arrest and died at Maidstone Hospital.

Senior coroner for North West Kent, Roger Hatch, has told the NHS trust it needs to take action to prevent future deaths.

He said: "It is highly unsatisfactory that facilities for a CT scan to be carried out at the weekend at Tunbridge Wells hospital are not routinely available without having to go through a number of steps for this to be arranged. 

"In this case the delay until the Monday was critical as the outcome has sadly demonstrated."

Source: kentonline

More than 100,000 patients injured or killed by medical 'blunders' in the Welsh NHS since 2010, shock figures reveal
More than 100,000 patients injured or killed by medical 'blunders' in the Welsh NHS since 2010, shock figures reveal
Published 9th Feb 2016
More than 100,000 patients have been injured or killed by medical “blunders” in the Welsh NHS
since 2010, new figures have revealed.
 
Documents released under the Freedom of Information Act show that patients were injured on at
least 102,807 separate occasions at Welsh hospitals, and an astonishing 1,742 of those led to
major harm – or even death.
 
On average, one Welsh NHS patient was harmed every 30 minutes as a result of doctors or nurses
misusing drugs or equipment, making mistakes over paperwork or providing negligent treatment.
 
In the last four financial years, Welsh NHS trusts paid out nearly £210m in medical negligence
compensation, enough to hire more than 9,000 new nurses, or 2,600 consultants.
 
Abertawe Bro Morgannwg paid out a staggering £45m over four years, the most of any health
board in Wales.
 
Aneurin Bevan and Betsi Cadwaladr paid the second and third most, with sums of £40m and £36m
respectively.
 
Cardiff and Vale UHB, which runs the 1,000-bed University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff, reported
the highest number of patient injuries, 26,054, and received 7,862 formal complaints from
patients.
 
A spokeswoman for Cwm Taf Health Board, which has paid out more than £30m in compensation
since 2010, said it is unacceptable for any patients to come to harm while in hospital.
 
She said: “The provision of safe and effective care for all out patients is our highest priority, which
is why we commit our resources to improve and learn from such events.
 
“We encourage all staff at all grades and in all posts to individually report patient safety incidents
no matter what level of harm has occurred.
 
“All incidents are reviewed and investigated thoroughly at a level that is appropriate due to the
event and level of harm.”
 
Source: Walesonline
 
 
1,300 babies were killed or maimed through NHS negligence in 2014 costing the health service £1billion
1,300 babies were killed or maimed through NHS negligence in 2014 costing the health service £1billion
Published 9th Feb 2016

More than £1billion was paid by the NHS in compensation in 2014 to the families of babies either killed or left with serious brain injuries by staff errors made during childbirth, it was today revealed.

The health service was found to be at fault for the deaths or maiming of 1,316 newborns in 2014 - a scandal campaigners are blaming on deep-rooted divisions between doctors and midwives.

Of those, the largest claims were for children left brain-damaged, who will need round the clock support for their entire lives.

The colossal ten-figure sum is £488million more than the claims settled by the NHS Litigation Authority only a decade ago.

James Titcombe's son Joshua died after a series of failings by staff at Furness General Hospital in 2008.

Speaking to The Times, he said: 'I think it's a scandal, the lack of learning from mistakes.

'People will make mistakes and nobody can blame staff but what is unacceptable is failure to learn.'

He added: 'That we're spending £1billion is absolutely shocking.

'Yes, we want to support women to have a normal birth, but we want to be very quick to recognise where normal becomes abnormal. 

'There should be no room for failing to learn, yet the system that we have at the moment is woefully inadequate.'

Official figures show that failures by doctors and midwives to monitor the heart rate of babies - an error made almost routinely in the context of the compensation claims settled - accounted for one in four pay-outs.

Costing the NHS £268million in settlements, the basic mistake - which, when observed, should see the labour process immediately quickened - led to hundreds of newborns having their brains starved of oxygen, leaving them with extensive neurological damage. 

Mervi Jokinen, of the Royal College of Midwives, said: 'We need to look at how the service is delivered and how we're going to recognise women and babies at risk.

'We need to make sure we work within teams with good communication.'

She added that, with heart rate monitors, there is a known doubt over danger zones. 

NHS bosses are believed to be planning an investigation - which comes at a time when resources are already massively stretched - with the data also showing a spike in claims for stillborn children.

Source: dailymail

Baby left with cerebral palsy after hospital birth awarded millions of pounds damages
Baby left with cerebral palsy after hospital birth awarded millions of pounds damages
Published 8th Feb 2016
A girl left with cerebral palsy after complications during her birth at a Black Country hospital is to
receive millions of pounds in damages from the NHS.
 
The youngster was delivered at Walsall Manor Hospital in 2010 but suffered oxygen starvation, Mrs
Justice Whipple told London’s High Court.
 
Her brain was irreversibly damaged and the five-year-old is now unable to walk or talk and has to
be fed through a tube.
 
Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust, which runs the hospital, today agreed to a settlement of the case
which guarantees her a big payout.
 
Whilst continuing to deny blame, the trust agreed to compensate her on the basis of 50 per cent
of the full value of her claim.
 
There would have been an ‘uncertain outcome’ if the case had gone to trial and it would have been
a ‘high risk’ for both sides, said the judge.
 
She added that the case ‘hinged on being able to show that delivery should have been achieved
earlier than it was’. She could have emerged from a trial ‘with an empty hand’, making the
settlement a better option.
 
Mrs Justice Whipple approved the ‘reasonable compromise’ and said the damages the girl will
received will be ‘substantial’.
 
She thanked the girl’s parents, siblings and wider family ‘for the care and love they have
undoubtedly given’ to her since she was born.
 
“I hope today’s approval will bring some closure to events of the past and leave her and her
family positive about the future,” added the judge.
An interim payment of £50,000 will be paid immediately to tide the girl over until a final
assessment of her damages.
 
Source: birminghammail

Sandwell and Birmingham City Hospital patients recalled after surgery
Sandwell and Birmingham City Hospital patients recalled after surgery
Published 8th Feb 2016

Patients are being recalled over pelvic procedures performed by Dr Angamuthu Arunkalaivanan.

Dr Arunkalaivanan, who previously worked for Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, is claimed to have used a procedure in his surgeries after it had been withdrawn as a treatment by health chiefs in 2009.

The trust, which runs Sandwell and City hospitals, has invited 191 of Dr Arunkalaivanan’s surgery patients to contact the trust to discuss their treatment.

Sandwell and West Birmingham trust medical director, Dr Roger Stedman, said: “This is following national guidelines that suggest that this procedure, although effective for many patients, is not recommended as first surgical treatment.

"Patients are invited to come and discuss the procedure with a senior gynaecologist who can review their condition, answer any queries and discuss whether any future treatment may be needed.”

Source: expressandstar

Mother, 33, left in a wheelchair for 8 years following botched foot surgery has her leg amputated so she can finally walk again
Mother, 33, left in a wheelchair for 8 years following botched foot surgery has her leg amputated so she can finally walk again
Published 8th Feb 2016

A mother who was left in a wheelchair following botched surgery on her foot can finally walk after sacrificing her leg and having a prosthetic fitted. 

Sophie Nicholson, 33, from Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, had a condition causing high arches in her foot and went to hospital in 2007 after finding it difficult to stand.

Surgeons carried out an operation to remove 4cm of bone in her foot - which the hospital has since admitted was 'inappropriate' - and woke up in agony.

Despite multiple more procedures and physiotherapy, she was left unable to walk and left confined to a wheelchair.

Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Trust have since admitted that other options should have been considered - and she was awarded £340,000 in compensation.

This year, she opted to have her lower leg removed and is finally able to walk again after being fitted with a prosthetic. 

Ms NIcholson was awarded £340,000 by the hospital, who admitted her botched foot surgery was 'inappropriate'. 'I'm trying to make up for all the time I've missed out on,' she said

She said: 'I'd had so many surgeries on my foot that I'd lost hope that anything could work.

'I'd had my whole foot reshaped; tendons moved, all my toes broken, reset and then fused all over a period of eight years without anything working.

'I was missing out on really important moments during my daughter's childhood like taking her to the park but couldn't do anything about it.

'All I could do was sit at home in my wheelchair, feeling isolated and unable to help myself, I missed out on so many important moments with my daughter.'

In April last year Ms Nicholson had her lower leg amputated and had a prosthetic leg fitted six weeks later, spending the following six months learning to walk with her new limb.

Source: dailymail

Mum compensated by Hospital Trust after errors in post-surgery care led to blood clot on her lung
Mum compensated by Hospital Trust after errors in post-surgery care led to blood clot on her lung
Published 4th Feb 2016

Tina Grace, 44, told how she thought she was going to die after developing blood clot on her lung – caused because she was sent home from hospital without blood thinning medication or compression stockings after major surgery.

Tina, whose youngest child was two at the time, feared her children would be left motherless after suffering the complication following a hysterectomy.

Three weeks after her operation, she suffered a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in her leg which then travelled to her lung, causing a pulmonary embolism.

King’s Mill Hospital has admitted it should have prescribed anti-clotting medication and ordered her to wear compression stockings when she was discharged, but failed to do so.

Miss Grace was hospitalised for 11 days as a result and had to take blood-thinning drug Warfarin for six months after the clot, which she didn’t think she would survive.

She said: “I really felt like I could have died. I was terrified and it felt like every breath I took would be my last.”

Miss Grace said the traumatic experience will live with her forever.

She had the hysterectomy on August 13, 2012, and was sent home five days afterwards.

She was very unwell and her parents, who questioned whether she should have been allowed out at the time, had to move in to care for her, and her two children, who were then aged 2 and 13.

But three weeks after the operation, Miss Grace suddenly became very breathless and unwell, with a burning sensation in her leg.

Her parents called an ambulance, and she was found to have had a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) in her calf, which had broken up and travelled to her lung, causing the potentially-fatal blood clot.

Miss Grace had been at a high risk of developing a DVT as she had had major surgery, had been immobile for several days afterwards, and was classed as overweight.

Source: Chad


Series of medical errors leads to 22-year-old's death
Series of medical errors leads to 22-year-old's death
Published 4th Feb 2016
Solicitors say the death of a 22-year-old woman from Swansea, who died after a series of medical
errors, could have been avoided.
 
Zoe Wilcox was diagnosed with gall stones and pancreatitis in March 2011 at Morriston Hospital in
Swansea.
 
Doctors there told her she should have her gall bladder removed as a matter of urgency, and she
was referred for surgery at Singleton Hospital, where she should have been seen within 48 hours.
 
But despite being part of the same NHS Trust, the two hospitals operate different IT systems and
her referral was lost.
 
Zoe returned to the A&E department at Morriston Hospital several times in the next month,
complaining of severe abdominal pain.
 
Each time her notes weren't consulted or available, and she was discharged with painkillers.
 
A month later, in April, Zoe was rushed to Morriston Hospital with severe pancreatitis. She died on
May 4th, leaving behind a three year old daughter, Tammy.
 
Since her death, Zoe's mother Angela has been looking for answers, and her solicitors have
secured a six-figure sum which will be held in a trust fund for her granddaughter Tammy.
 
As a family we are all heartbroken. I lost my beautiful daughter, but I am absolutely devastated
for my granddaughter Tammy, who lost her mum at such a young age.
 
We cannot believe this has happened. The trust fund for Tammy will never replace her mum -
hopefully the communication system at the hospitals has since changed for the better.
 
I wouldn't want to see another family go through what my family went through. People should be
aware of the dangers of having gall stones as they can kill if left untreated.
 
Source: ITV
Horror fog M5 bus crash victim set to receive £2 million compensation
Horror fog M5 bus crash victim set to receive £2 million compensation
Published 4th Feb 2016
A fruit picker from Birmingham who was left with ‘terrible injuries’ after a fatal coach crash on the
M5 is set to receive more than £2 million in damages.
 
The man, in his 30s, was a passenger on the coach driven by Jasminder Singh Dhesi , 53, of
Nethell Hall Avenue, Great Barr, on March 24 2012.
 
Dhesi had been drinking before his un-roadworthy coach, carrying 34 passengers, broke down
three times on the foggy motorway.There were 30 passengers inside.
 
The vehicle, which was carrying agricultural workers from Birmingham to Evesham, Worcestershire,
was hit by a lorry while broken-down for the third time.
 
Tragedy struck between junctions three and four, where there was no hard shoulder.
 
Dhesi was jailed for six years in 2013 after he admitted causing two deaths by dangerous driving .
 
Passenger Liaquat Ali, 35, of Smethwick, and Somerset lorry driver, William Mapstone, 65, lost
their lives.
 
The 32-year-old passenger, who cannot be named due to his acute vulnerability, was left with
serious brain damage and multiple broken bones.
 
He appeared at London’s High Court on crutches as his barrister, Paul Bleasdale QC, said it had
not been a ‘straightforward case’.
 
The QC said his client was ‘disappointed with the result of the negotiations’ and ‘does not believe
the compensation package is sufficient’.
 
And the man, who now plans to return to his native India, told the court that he felt he had been
‘unfairly and unjustly treated’.
 
But Mr Justice Mitting said he was ‘satisfied’ that the settlement - valued at just over £2million -
was in his ‘best interests’.
 
“He is not the man who arrived in the UK and, as a result of the terrible injuries he has sustained,
he will face a life in India which will be much less satisfactory,” the judge added.
 
Richard Hartley QC, representing motor insurers, said that the man was ‘an innocent victim in a
dreadful road traffic accident which changed his life’.
 
Source: birminghammail
Woman dies in surgery after spelling error delays blood supply
Woman dies in surgery after spelling error delays blood supply
Published 4th Feb 2016
Irmgard Cooper, with husband Raymond. Irmgard died at Northwick Park hospital after blood to be
used for her operation was sent back. Photograph
 
A woman bled to death after a spelling mistake meant blood intended for her during an operation
was sent back.
 
Irmgard Cooper, 85, died at Northwick Park hospital in Harrow, north-west London, after blood
supplies were severely delayed.
 
An inquest on Friday at North London coroner’s court heard that her name had been spelt as
Irngard instead of Irmgard, resulting in the delay.
 
The surgeon had also not been told that no blood supplies were available during the operation
until he was carrying out the procedure on 7 May last year.
 
By the time replacement supplies arrived Cooper, from Hayling Island, Hampshire, had died, the
Brent and Kilburn Times reported.
 
Cooper had the operation to repair a large bulge in the main artery to her heart.
 
The coroner, Andrew Walker, found gross failings in the effort to provide blood at a critical time,
when it was already known that supplies would be required.
 
A serious incident investigation report by the hospital found that Cooper died from serious blood-
clotting difficulties, cardiovascular collapse and haemorrhage, and that the delay in getting blood
caused her death.
 
The chief executive of London North West Healthcare NHS trust, Jacqueline Docherty, said: “I would
like to offer my sincere condolences to the family of Irmgard Cooper and say how sorry I am for
what happened.
 
“We accept the coroner’s verdict. Prior to the inquest, the trust undertook a full internal
investigation and has implemented systems to ensure that incidents of this nature do not occur
again.”
 
Source: theguardian 
Alleged Scarborough Hospital blunder leaves girl, 14, in wheelchair
Alleged Scarborough Hospital blunder leaves girl, 14, in wheelchair
Published 4th Feb 2016

Doctors at Scarborough Hospital failed to diagnose a serious hip injury to the girl, now 14, during examinations over a period of almost two years, a High Court writ claims.

She has been left with one leg six centimetres shorter than the other, and severe mobility problems, and now needs crutches or a wheelchair to get around, it is claimed.

She will be permanently wheelchair dependent by the time she is middle-aged and her problems have had a devastating impact on her education, her legal team adds.

Through her mother, the girl is now suing the York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, claiming she was a victim of medical negligence.

She was seen again at the hospital in January 2012, and again the painful hip was recorded as being “normal”, the writ states.

In fact, Mr Roussak says she had suffered a severe slipped upper femoral epiphysis - a condition in which the top of the thigh bone becomes disconnected from the hip.

The condition was finally diagnosed after an A&E visit in March 2012 but, by then, complications had set in which have blighted the girl’s life.

She has had to undergo repeated surgical procedures and will need a hip replacement “in her late teens,” Mr Roussak says.

That artificial hip will fail and is likely to became unrepairable by the time she is in her forties, meaning she will at that stage be confined to a wheelchair, the writ states.

Of the impact on her future, Mr Roussak added: “She missed more than two years of schooling and her possible educational achievement is therefore most uncertain.

“Accurate assessment of her future likely losses is impossible at this stage.”

Mr Roussak also states in the writ that the NHS trust’s solicitors have “admitted liability for the claimant’s injury” in writing.

The NHS Trust’s defence to the action was not available from the court, and the contents of the writ have yet to be tested in evidence before a judge.

Source: thescarboroughnews


Parents of baby who suffocated at birth 'talked out of caesarean by hospital staff'
Parents of baby who suffocated at birth 'talked out of caesarean by hospital staff'
Published 4th Feb 2016
The grieving parents of a baby boy who suffocated at birth say a caesarean would have saved him.
 
Hayley and Adam Powsney’s son Joshua was stillborn at North Manchester General Hospital in
February 2014.
 
The couple, from Bury, Manchester, claim his death could have been prevented if Hayley had been
given an immediate C-section when medical staff discovered their baby was breech.
 
When a different consultant took over the couple’s care following a shift change, they said they
were persuaded to proceed with a natural birth.
 
The couple say they were never fully told about the risks a natural labour posed to their unborn
son.
 
And they have now hit out at hospital bosses after being excluded from a major investigation into
maternity deaths, reports the Manchester Evening News.
 
Adam, 33, a civil servant, said: “I cannot put into words the anger and upset I feel at the advice
we were given that led us to believe that a natural labour would have been safer for Hayley and
Joshua instead of a C-section.
 
“Our initial instincts to have a C-section when we found out Joshua was breech were ignored, and
our instincts turned out to be right.”
 
To Hayley and Adam’s devastation, baby Joshua did not survive birth.
 
“He was born feet first and his legs were kicking,” says Adam.
 
“They asked me if I wanted to know whether we had a boy or girl. He was a perfectly healthy baby and should never have died.
 
"We held him for five hours after he was born.
 
“He was my beautiful first born son. He had my curly hair and Hayley’s lovely cheeks and face.”
 
Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, which runs the hospital, admitted clinical negligence and
apologised to the family.
 
The trust have admitted they failed to discuss and document the pros and cons of a natural birth
with Hayley.
 
Doctors also conceded they failed to monitor Joshua’s heart rate throughout labour.
 
Source: Mirror
 
 
 
Family settlement for Walsall Manor Hospital death after medics failed to diagnose patient three times
Family settlement for Walsall Manor Hospital death after medics failed to diagnose patient three times
Published 1st Feb 2016
The family of a 30-year-old Walsall man who 'died in agony' after medics failed to diagnose his
conditions three times have received an out-of-court settlement.
 
Bus driver Andrew Raybould died after suffering from severe pancreatitis, sepsis and multi-organ
failure at Walsall Manor Hospital in February 2012.
 
His parents Geoff and Maureen from Aldridge said he had been discharged from the hospital three
times previously without a diagnosis.
 
Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust accepted he should not have been discharged in the January and
lessons have been learned following the death of Mr Raybould.
 
Mr Raybould first began suffering symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and
constipation at the end of December 2011.
 
On January 3, 2012 his GP referred him to Walsall Manor Hospital for investigations as to the
cause of his symptoms but was sent home.
 
By the end of January he had lost two stone in weight and was in constant severe pain. After being
admitted to Walsall Manor again, he was eventually diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, acute renal
failure and sepsis.
 
Mr Raybould was admitted to the intensive care unit on January 29, but he was too ill to undergo
surgery and his major organs began shutting down. He died on February 2.
 
Amir Khan, medical director at the trust, said: “We have offered our full and unreserved apologies
for the failings identified in relation to the care Mr Raybould received which we accept fell below the
trust’s usual high standards.
 
“Our thorough investigation concluded that further investigations should have been undertaken
and that Mr Raybould should not have been discharged on January 14, 2013.
 
"We also concluded that communication should have been made clearer for both the patient and
his family around arrangements to return to hospital if he continued to feel unwell. We accept that
communication could also have been improved with Mr Raybould’s family as his condition
deteriorated."
 
Source: expressandstar

Wolverhampton's New Cross Hospital pay out over botched operation after appeal thrown out
Wolverhampton's New Cross Hospital pay out over botched operation after appeal thrown out
Published 1st Feb 2016

New Cross Hospital will be forced to pay out compensation to a woman who underwent a botched hip operation which left her unable to work after its case was thrown out by the Court of Appeal.

Last year, the High Court ruled that a surgeon at New Cross had failed in a hip operation to detect and remove bone cement – a medical sealant - which had escaped from the socket of the hip bone of June Evans, aged 79.

The failure to spot the bone cement had left Ms Evans with permanent sciatic nerve damage, unable to walk and in a huge amount of pain. Her home also required modifications because of her limited mobility.

But the Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust refused to accept the High Court's ruling and took Ms Evans through an 18-month appeals process before the Court of Appeal ruled in her favour last week.

She said: “I am in more pain after the operation than I was before. I’ve been in a wheelchair ever since as I cannot walk anymore. Coping with that day to day is bad enough but it’s appalling that the Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust added to my worries by refusing to accept the decision against them in the High Court and forced me to go through an 18-month appeal process before they lost again.

“Trying to cope with the damage that was done to my sciatic nerve has been difficult as I have had no money to adapt my home. The compensation will go some way to helping me get my independence back and I am grateful to Thompsons who have supported me throughout.”

Dr Jonathan Odum, Medical Director for the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, said: “We accept and acknowledge the findings of the court and wish to apologise to Ms Evans for the problems she has encountered since surgery in 2011.”

This is another example of the NHS complete disregard for patients and their safety. Instead of accepting they were at fault without the need to push Ms Evans in to unnecessary litigation, the NHS even after being found liable then challenged the courts findings and took this to the court of appeal and rightly failed with this folly.

This type of action by the NHS and their lawyers causes more distress for the victim by the wrongdoer (the NHS) it also increases the costs to a huge amount. This is the reason clinical negligence litigation costs so much in this country due to the NHS failing to be accountable for incompetence that is administered by their hospitals.

The present Government is unfortunately trying to prevent access to justice of by making the system cheaper instead of preventing the negligence in the first place which is what any decent Government would do. We will continue to strive and fight for our client’s against the NHS and private medical providers.

 Source: expressandstar

Grandmother who was given Ketamine by the NHS is left with irreversible liver damage after doctors failed to monitor its effects
Grandmother who was given Ketamine by the NHS is left with irreversible liver damage after doctors failed to monitor its effects
Published 1st Feb 2016
A grandmother has been left with irreversible liver damage after doctors prescribed her a powerful
tranquilliser frequently used as an illegal party drug.
 
Eleanor Ferry, 63, said her life has been ‘cut short and made a misery’ as a result of a decade
using ketamine, which she was given to alleviate nerve pain – but instead made her feel like she
was ‘going mad’.
 
The class B drug was developed as a sedative for large animals but can be used in small doses to
treat nerve problems and chronic pain. However, it risks injury to the liver and bladder, and in
larger doses causes powerful hallucinations.
 
In the ten years Mrs Ferry was taking daily doses of the highly-addictive tranquilliser, doctors failed
to take a single blood test to monitor its effect.
 
And when she complained it was ineffective and making her ill, the consultant anaesthetist
responded by upping her dosage.
 
While taking the drug between 2001 and 2011, the former council administrator from Carlisle had
a short appointment with a specialist at the Cumberland Infirmary once every six months.
 
But she said he was more concerned with keeping the appointments brief than listening to her
concerns.
 
Mrs Ferry said: ‘Ketamine was a new word to me – I had never heard of it before ... I was
completely in his hands and I trusted him. I’m stunned by the level of complacency that was
shown towards me. My life will be shorter and harder because of it.
 
‘It beggars belief that the thing this expert said would help me has destroyed my liver irreparably.’
 
The grandmother-of-four was given the drug to ease the severe bouts of pain she experienced in
her face because of a type of neuralgia. But rather than alleviate her headaches it made her feel
even worse.
 
She said: ‘When I was put on a stronger dosage, I remember feeling nauseous and peculiar just
minutes after I took it.
 
‘Only now do I realise that I was high. It was a really frightening experience – I thought I was
going mad.’
 
Trust issues: In the ten years Mrs Ferry was taking daily doses of the highly-addictive tranquilliser,
doctors failed to take a single blood test to monitor its effect (file image) 
 
The damage to Mrs Ferry’s liver only came to light when her GP did a blood test after a minor
chest infection in 2011.
 
She said: ‘I was told that a normal reading is about 36. Mine was 50 times that.
 
‘There is no treatment for cirrhosis of the liver so it is devastating.’
 
Cirrhosis is caused by long-term damage whereby scar tissue replaces healthy tissue. It cannot be
reversed and can become so extensive the liver stops functioning.
 
Source: dailymail 
Hunt apologises for NHS failings over baby death
Hunt apologises for NHS failings over baby death
Published 26th Jan 2016
England's Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt says the NHS will learn from serious failings that led to the
death of a one-year-old boy.
 
William Mead, from Cornwall, died in 2014 from blood poisoning that had not been diagnosed by
GPs or the NHS out-of-hours 111 helpline.
 
In response to an urgent question in the House of Commons, Mr Hunt apologised to William's
parents.
 
He acknowledged that there were things that needed to be done better.
 
Mr Hunt told MPs: "Whilst any health system will inevitably suffer some tragedies, the issues in
this case have significant implications for the rest of the NHS that I'm determined we should learn
from."
 
The official NHS England report into William's death, seen by the Daily Mail and BBC News, says
William might have lived if NHS 111 call handers, who are not medically trained, had realised the
seriousness of his condition.
 
If a medic had taken the final phone call instead they probably would have realised William's
"cries as a child in distress" meant he needed urgent medical attention, it says.
 
Melissa Mead: "I touched his cheek and it was warm... but he didn't move"
 
Staff at the local NHS 111 service that took Mrs Mead's call have since been given extra training to
recognise when cases might be more complex and need referring up.
 
Mr Hunt said: "When you look at the totality of what the Mead family suffered, there is a confusion
in the public mind which the NHS needs to address.
 
"The issue is that there are too many choices and you can't always get through quickly to the help
you need. We need to improve the simplicity of the system so when you go to 111 you aren't
asked a barrage of questions and you get the care you need more quickly."
 
He said all NHS 111 centres had expert clinicians on hand to give advice, and that it wasn't
appropriate for every call to be answered by a doctor or a nurse. But he said he would look at
whether NHS 111 might need more of these skilled staff.
 
Source: BBC
 
C&S Solicitors are a panel firm for legal expense insurers for medical negligence claims and due to our specialism in this area will fight for the right of the patient who has incurred the damage caused by incorrect treatment, misdiagnosis or any other reasons against the NHS or private providers. We deal throughout England and Wales and are happy to talk on a no obligation basis to see if we believe you have basis for a claim. 
  
Doctor on trial for the manslaughter of young teacher who died after a Caesarian ‘did not have the correct qualifications’
Doctor on trial for the manslaughter of young teacher who died after a Caesarian ‘did not have the correct qualifications’
Published 21st Jan 2016
A doctor accused of the manslaughter of a young mother who died after giving birth by Caesarian section did not have the correct qualifications, a court heard. 
Primary school teacher Frances Cappuccini, 30, died of a heart attack after an operation to stop heavy blood loss at Tunbridge Wells Hospital, Kent, in 2012.
Dr Errol Cornish, 68, a consultant anaesthetist from South Africa, is charged with gross negligence manslaughter and is currently standing trial at Inner London Crown Court.
Dr Cornish did not meet the standard of employment as a consultant anaesthetist in UK, anaesthetics expert Professor Philip Hopkins today told the court. 
He told the court: 'He had not undertaken a recognised training programme or gone through a process known as equivalence with the General Medical Council to make training outside the UK up to date with this country.
'He met the standard as a locum anaesthetist but not for the role he was fulfilling at the time.
'The trust should make efforts to appoint doctors who meet requirements for such a substantive post.
The court also heard that the standard of treatment Dr Nadeem Azzez, who worked alongside Dr Cornish, gave Mrs Cappuccini after she gave birth to her second son Giacomo fell well below that expected of a professional working on a labour ward.
Professor Hopkins said that if Dr Azeez called for assistance from a more senior medic sooner, the 30-year-old mother would have lived. 
The court also heard he was not qualified enough to take up the level of his post when he began in 2008 and since then had not received any professional training. 
Mrs Cappuccini died hours after having a Caesarean and subsequent surgery to stop postpartum bleeding at Tunbridge Wells Hospital in Pembury, Kent, on October 9 2012.
Dr Azeez is not being prosecuted because he has left the country.  
Prof Hopkins told their trial that Azeez made errors before during and after the surgery, which led her to die hours later without regaining consciousness.
Source: dailymail

Traffic accidents: The top 5 culprits and how to claim if you've been hurt
Traffic accidents: The top 5 culprits and how to claim if you've been hurt
Published 21st Jan 2016
Top 5 most common road accident causes
 
5. Drink Driving
 
Luckily, this isn't the most common cause of traffic accidents but it is one of the most publicised
and carries the heaviest punishments.
 
Drinking too much before getting behind the wheel is just a terrible idea; alcohol drastically
decreases awareness and reaction time, two really key things you need to drive.
 
There is a legal limit (35mg per 100ml of breath) but with variations in body weight, height and
gender, it’s not really a one rule fits all kind of deal.
 
4. Speeding
 
It’s not just speeding that causes accidents (only around 13% of serious accidents are because of
this), it’s driving too fast during a particular situation.
 
Taking a bend in the road too fast, or coming into a junction or a set of lights far too quick to stop
in time.
 
Situations like this cause a number of drivers to miss their mark when stopping and cause the
worst to happen.
 
3. Careless or Reckless Driving
 
Much like alcohol, becoming frustrated to the point of exploding, or driving around in a blind panic
are just as dangerous to others on the road as yourself.
 
2. Poor Judgement
 
This refers to things like failing to judge another person’s speed and pulling out or turning too
early.
 
In a lot of cases, the oncoming vehicle wasn’t speeding; the other person just misjudged the
situation and thought they could nip out ahead too soon.
 
1. Failing to look
 
Number one on this list is the cause of a third of traffic accidents.
 
Whether you're distracted, hampered by a blind spot or switching off for a split second - not paying
attention can easily result in a traffic accident.
 
It’s so easily done, which is what makes this a common occurrence.
 
Start your claim today by:
 
 - Phoning us on 01562 752 199 
 
- Let us call you 
 
- Use our online claim form
 
C&S Solicitors are a panel firm for legal expense insurers for medical negligence claims and due to
our specialism in this area will fight for the right of the patient who has incurred the damage
caused by incorrect treatment, misdiagnosis or any other reasons against the NHS or private
providers. We deal throughout England and Wales and are happy to talk on a no obligation basis
to see if we believe you have basis for a claim.
 
Source: Mirror
 
 
Passenger sues British Airways after being hit on head by falling rucksack
Passenger sues British Airways after being hit on head by falling rucksack
Published 21st Jan 2016

A plane passenger is suing British Airways after he was injured by a bag falling from an overhead compartment.

Wayne Herbert, 45, a writer from north London, suffered “searing pain” when a fellow traveller’s bag hit him in the head as he sat waiting to take off.

He claims he “saw stars” when the rucksack, containing a laptop, smashed into his head and neck, causing whiplash injuries. 

He was taken off the US-bound plane on October 28 and assessed by a paramedic, but was not taken to hospital.

 “I was offloaded, based on BA’s telephone medical advice, and flew the following day. But they have been awful in sorting this out for me, and I’m now taking legal action. They also did little to help me get home comfortably.”

Mr Herbert, from Crouch End, was travelling to America to work on his novel, but said the injury meant he struggled to sit at a computer.

He criticised BA’s policy of allowing passengers to take large pieces of hand luggage on to planes. He added: “I’m still suffering anxiety — this is an ongoing injury.  The staff certainly were not checking what people were doing and I’m suffering as a result.”

The maximum weight for a piece of hand luggage allowed by BA is 23kg (51lb) and passengers must be able to lift it into the overhead lockers.

A BA spokesman said: “Our cabin crew gave every possible help to our customer and we are still in contact with him to resolve this issue.”

Source: standard

A salutary lesson from beyond a child’s grave
A salutary lesson from beyond a child’s grave
Published 20th Jan 2016
It was perhaps the biggest scandal in NHS history.
 
But the legacy of the hundreds of tragic patients sacrificed needlessly to negligence at Stafford
Hospital was to be that it could never be repeated.
 
Health leaders everywhere went into overdrive coming up with safeguards to make sure of that - or
at least convince an increasingly sceptical public to put their trust back into hospitals.
 
This all culminated in the Robert Francis report which pulled out so many shocking facts about care
at Stafford between 2005 and 2009.
 
In our non-perfect world, mistakes and poor care are occasionally inevitable but the report was full
of measures to have them pushed into the open quickly so changes could be made and patients
protected.
 
Whistleblowers were encouraged to flag up bad practice to their superiors; openness and
transparency were to be the norm under a new duty of candour given to hospitals; staff told there
would be no blame if they owned up to mistakes; complaints from patients would be investigated
as never before.
 
A three-year-old from Cannock died in contentious circumstances at Stafford Hospital in August
2014 - less than three months before the takeover and when UHNS was all but running the place
anyway.
 
The tragedy followed a severe allergic reaction to a special type of milk-feed given through a tube
directly into his stomach.
 
Despite complaints to the contrary from frantic parents, a hospital investigation, a post-mortem
and a coroner's inquest all ruled Jonnie's death was down to natural causes.
 
But since then a woman nursing assistant who was in the same room has come forward to claim a
witness statement was 'invented' in her name.
 
The parents would not drop their complaint and won an independent review by consultant
paediatrician Martin Farrier.
 
Last week Farrier reported and his main findings were that the family's fears were correct and there
is still a "closed culture" in the NHS preventing complaints being heard.
 
Cannock Chase clinical commissioning group has even offered to try and secure a second inquest.
 
Its chief officer, Andrew Donald, has said about the UHNM: "It needs to demonstrate to the
outside world that the way they handle complaints is totally different from the way Jonnie's case
was handled."
 
C&S Solicitors are a specialist medical negligence firm of Solicitors. It is unfortunate that still (after
all the failing at many hospitals including Stafford) seeing the ingrained culture of cover up and
missing documents that still exists from many hospitals and NHS trusts. The way the NHS system
works and their members of staff being afraid of consultants has led and still leads to this culture
of fear within the NHS.
  
C&S Solicitors are a panel firm for legal expense insurers for medical negligence claims and due to
our specialism in this area will fight for the right of the patient who has incurred the damage
caused by incorrect treatment, misdiagnosis or any other reasons against the NHS or private providers. We deal throughout England and Wales and are happy to talk on a no obligation basis to see if we believe you have basis for a claim. With recent Montgomery case the law has changed and we are happy to look at your case for you over consent issues also.
 
Source: stokesentinel
Patients left with tooth decay and gum disease by Milton Keynes dentist win compensation
Patients left with tooth decay and gum disease by Milton Keynes dentist win compensation
Published 20th Jan 2016
Two patients have been compensated for their pain and suffering after the same Milton Keynes
dentist faced legal claims for failing to provide basic standards of treatment, causing them to
suffer unnecessary pain and discomfort.
 
Dentist Ewa Sliwowska failed to diagnose or treat tooth decay and gum disease in two patients who
each went on to suffer significant pain after being treated by her at Beanhill Dental Practice in
Perrydown.
 
The first patient had visited the practice complaining of pain. It was claimed Ms Sliwowska placed
an inadequate filling in a decayed tooth, when root canal treatment would have been appropriate.
 
The dentist also faced accusations of failing to provide treatment for four decayed teeth, and
failing to give any hygiene advice.
 
Ms Sliwowska went on to perform root canal treatment on the patient which was also considered by
the expert to lack reasonable skill and care, causing further pain.
 
Overall, it was claimed the poor treatment had caused the patient to suffer unnecessarily for 11
months, leaving them needing specialist root canal treatment. The patient received a settlement
of £5,000.
 
The second patient had attended complaining of a root sticking out of his gum. The root was
removed several days later, but at that stage the dentist did not perform an X-ray, which it was
claimed would have showed tooth decay and gum disease.
 
Over the course of several more visits, it was alleged that Ms Sliwowska failed to diagnose
widespread gum disease which was later found to be present, and did not provide any scaling, or
hygiene instructions.
 
When the patient sought a second opinion at another dental practice, where radiographs were
taken, gum disease was diagnosed and the patient was advised that two teeth would need to be
removed, and a partial denture fitted.
 
Instead, he was left with a great deal of inconvenience, discomfort, and expense, and received a
settlement of £11,500.
 
Source: onemk
Wirral man who lost his sight through hospital negligence receives £2m pay out
Wirral man who lost his sight through hospital negligence receives £2m pay out
Published 20th Jan 2016
A Wirral man who had already lost his sight in one eye went blind after doctors at Arrowe Park
Hospital failed to properly monitor and treat him for problems with his other eye.
 
Colin Fortune, 39, from Saughall Massie, has won a £2m settlement after the shocking blunder left
him unable to work and reliant on his family and friends.
 
The father-of-four was under the care of staff at Arrowe Park Hospital for treatment to his left eye
after losing his sight in his right as a result of a sports accident in 2001.
 
But his vision began to deteriorate and, despite having an operation at the Royal Liverpool
Hospital in a last-ditch attempt to save it, he lost the sight in his remaining eye.
 
The hospital has apologised but he said no amount of money could make up for everything he
has lost.
 
Mr Fortune, originally from Upton, said he was previously able to live a normal life - but he has
now lost his independence, split up with his partner, had to give up his job and finds it difficult to
travel to see his children.
 
He said: “In 2008 I went to the optician and they said I had raised pressure in my eye. Arrowe
Park started treatment for glaucoma but they didn’t do any of the tests you’re meant to have for
it.
 
 “They were meant to be seeing me every six to 12 weeks but they cancelled a lot of
appointments on me.
 
“I kept ringing them saying ‘My sight’s getting worse and you’re cancelling appointments’.
 
“I eventually found out I had a detached retina, which was diagnosed in 2011 when they sent me
to the Royal for a special glaucoma operation.
 
“It developed into end stage glaucoma because the retina had been detached for that long.
 
“I had noticed my sight was getting worse and worse and I couldn’t see as well as I had previously.
I don’t know how they missed it.”
 
Mr Fortune was a team leader for a care organisation but had to give up his job.
 
His relationship with his partner broke down under the stress of losing his sight and he said he has
suffered from depression.
 
He said: “Everything has changed. I used to play sport and I used to go to the match all the time.
I’ve split up with my partner and I rely on other people to cook and take me out.
 
“The biggest thing you notice is your independence – I’ve lost all of it. I have to pay a carer to do
the things I used to be able to do myself.
 
“If you want to go out in the car or go for a walk or to see someone you just can’t do it on your
own.”
 
Mr Fortune said he had nothing but praise for the staff at the Royal who tried to save his sight and
he is still under the Liverpool hospital’s care as an out-patient.
 
He said: “I had the best retinal surgeon but it was too late. You had to give it six weeks after the
operation but my sight never came back.
 
“Arrowe Park admitted negligence and I did get a letter of apology but it doesn’t mean anything. I
was able to live a normal life but this has affected everything – my career, seeing my kids.
 
“It has changed my whole life.”
 
Source: liverpoolecho
Cyclist wins £100,000 payout after road crash injuries forced him to quit job
Cyclist wins £100,000 payout after road crash injuries forced him to quit job
Published 19th Jan 2016
A cyclist forced to quit his job after suffering serious injuries in a road accident has received a
£100,000 payout - and is now set to marry the love of his life.
 
Dad-of-four Heath Marshall, 48, was forced to quit mechanics after being hit by a motorbike in Lea
Marston, Sutton Coldfield.
 
He fractured his skull in the horror smash and also suffered serious leg injuries.
 
But after the out-of-court settlement he now plans to marry sweetheart Marie Brant, 38, and move
with their two children into a new home after spending the last three years in a caravan.
 
Heath, from Erdington, said he still has flashbacks from the accident, which took place in January
2014.
 
“It was just horrific,” said the keen cyclist, who used to ride up to 30 miles a day.
 
“It was very touch and go at the time and I think it was my fitness that got me through.
 
“I don’t remember too much about the accident but I do have flashbacks, particularly when I go
past the spot where it happened.”
 
Disaster struck one month before the planned wedding when a recovering Heath sat on his bike for
the first time since the accident.
 
“My leg just went from underneath me and my knee shattered,” he said.
 
“We had to cancel the wedding. My fiancé was devastated but there was no way we could have
done it.
 
“I want to be able to stand up and say my vows and not be sitting there in a wheelchair.”
 
The couple plan to tie the knot this September and finally move into a house of their own.
 
“We moved into the caravan before my accident so we could save for a deposit for our own home,’’
he said.
 
“But that all went horribly wrong because I had to quit my job.
 
“We are staying with friends at the moment because it is far too cold to be living in a caravan at
the moment.”
 
As well as his injuries, Heath was also diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder.
 
“I find it very hard to concentrate for long periods and I find I repeat myself a lot,” he said.
 
“It’s down to the head injury and I know in time I will get to a point where I can begin to accept
things.
 
“But it is very hard at the moment and I have some very bad days.”
 
Source: birminghammail
 
 
Pupil paid £250,000 in compensation after suffering serious injury at Leicester school
Pupil paid £250,000 in compensation after suffering serious injury at Leicester school
Published 19th Jan 2016
A pupil has received £250,000 in compensation after being injured at a Leicester school.
 
Leicester City Council has released details of the payment following a Freedom of Information
request.
 
The incident occurred in 2008 but compensation was only forthcoming last year, when the full
extent of the child's injuries became clear.
 
A city council spokesman said: "The payment included compensation for loss of future career
aspiration as a result of injury.
 
"We cannot release details of the nature of the injury as that could identify the individual."
 
There were three other successful claims made by pupils injured in Leicester schools which were
settled by the council last year.
 
In total, they amounted to £9,446 and were for a child suffering an injury to their foot during a PE
lesson and two slip/trip claims.
 
Again, the council has not released further details because it says to do so could identify the
children.
 
Payments in the £250,000 range are likely to be for things like loss of limbs, blindness or brain
injury.
 
The council said compensation paid was covered by the council's insurance arrangements.
 
The spokesman said: "The city council defends all claims and only pays compensation when
legally liable.
 
"We take health and safety in our schools very seriously.
 
"Unfortunately, sometimes things do go wrong in spite of everyone's best efforts and this may
result in pupils or teachers being injured.
 
"We have about 50,000 children attending school in Leicester. This equates to about 10 million
pupils days in a year.
 
 
"Our compensation rate is very small indeed when considered in this context, and serious
accidents in schools are extremely rare."
 
Source: leicestermercury
 
Breast surgeon Ian Paterson appears in court
Breast surgeon Ian Paterson appears in court
Published 19th Jan 2016
Breast surgeon Ian Paterson has appeared in court charged with 21 counts of unlawfully and
maliciously wounding 11 patients.
 
Paterson did not enter a plea to the Section 18 assault charges – when he appeared at
Birmingham Magistrate’s Court yesterday.
 
A section 18 assault – referred to as wounding with intent or causing grievous bodily harm with
intent – places the focus on the phrase ‘with intent’.
 
Paterson, of Castle Mill Lane, Altrincham, in Cheshire, treated hundreds of women at Solihull
Hospital and the private Spire Parkway Hospital from 1993 to 2012, which is when the offences are
alleged to have taken place.
 
He was suspended by the General Medical Council in 2012 after allegations he carried out
unnecessary, inappropriate and/or unregulated operations.
 
He is accused of carrying out invasive breast surgery on women with suspected breast cancer when
a simple biopsy may have been sufficient.
 
He is also accused of using the banned ‘cleavage sparing’ mastectomy procedure.
 
This controversial and unapproved approach involves leaving behind some potentially cancerous
tissue for cosmetic reasons and leaving women in greater danger of their cancer returning.
 
Patterson also carried out procedures on women who didn’t even have breast cancer.
 
Concerns about his work first came to light in 2007, but he was not excluded from the Heart of
England NHS Trust until 2011.
 
A spokesperson for Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust said: “We appreciate the distress
caused to patients and their families.
 
Paterson has been granted conditional bail to appear before Birmingham Crown Court on February
15.
 
C&S Solicitors are involved in the litigation for the victims of Mr. Paterson as such we have access
to a litigation amnesty granted by the court. Therefore if you or anyone you know has been a
victim of Mr. Paterson at the Spire Group or through the Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust
(Heartlands, Solihull or Good Hope Hospitals)  please contact us urgently so that your claim can be
registered with the court. We conduct these matters on a no win no fee basis.
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this
that you or your family may encounter.
Wife died six days after being sent home from hospital with headache pills
Wife died six days after being sent home from hospital with headache pills
Published 19th Jan 2016
A distraught husband has revealed his beloved wife died of multiple organ failure just six days
after being sent home from A&E with headache tablets.
 
Susan Sedgwick, from Hopwood, Birmingham, visited the Queen Elizabeth Hospital suffering
severe abdominal pain.
 
The 53-year-old was diagnosed with gallstones after a physical examination, but was sent home
with painkiller co-codamol without any further tests.
 
Six days later her devoted husband Bob switched off her life support machine at the Alexandra
Hospital in Redditch, after Sue collapsed from multiple organ failure.
 
 “I am very angry,” said Bob, who married Susan in 1997. “A simple operation would have saved
her life.
 
“Now I have no wife and no future.
 
“I had to take the decision to turn off her life-support machine because she was in unbearable
pain.”
 
Su had first discovered she had gallstones in 2010 after a private consultation with a doctor, who
also diagnosed her with diverticular disease – known as pockets in the bowel.
 
The former bank manager managed the conditions living on a healthy diet, but after suffering
severe pain, she attended A&E on Tuesday February 5 2013.
 
Concerned husband Bob made a private appointment at the Priory Hospital for the afternoon of
Friday February 8.
 
But Su would never make the appointment as she was rushed to the Alexandra Hospital, and later
transferred to intensive care.
 
“They realised she was very ill, and she was beyond help.
 
“A simple procedure a few days earlier would have been the end of the problem.
 
“In a few days she went from not ill enough, in their opinion, to beyond help.”
 
In a statement the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust said: “The Trust offers
its sincere condolences to Mr Sedgwick on the death of his wife, Susan.
 
“We carried out a full investigation into Mrs Sedgwick’s treatment in the Queen Elizabeth Hospital
Birmingham Emergency Department.
 
Source: birminghammail
Daughter demands answers after mother dies three days after being admitted to West Middlesex hospital
Daughter demands answers after mother dies three days after being admitted to West Middlesex hospital
Published 18th Jan 2016

A daughter whose mother died at West Middlesex Hospital three days after falling at home demanded answers at an inquest today.

Angela Richards, who lived in Nelson Road, Whitton, was admitted to the hospital on April 29, 2014, after falling in her bedroom.

The inquest into her death began this morning.

The 78-year-old, originally from Dublin, died three days later after suffering from respiratory failure due to fractured ribs and an injured lung.

Speaking at West London Coroner’s Court this morning, her daughter, Caroline Brand, said she visited her mother that evening and that she was “sitting up, eating cottage pie and talking”.

But by the next day, her health had deteriorated dramatically.

She told the court: “Mum’s was a very short story on April 30 and, for me, the tipping point is there were people who could have changed that journey – that’s what I’m interested in.

“I left feeling she was in good hands – the next day I visited and the contrast was stark.

“It was quite shocking really, she was very confused and she was no longer sitting up.”

Mrs Richards had been booked in for surgery but it was deferred until the next day, by which time her conditioned had worsened.

Ms Brand said a doctor asked her to look at her mother’s leg, which had turned blue, and told her she was “very, very poorly”.

Paying tribute to her mother, she added: “My mum was a small Irish woman who was a fantastic mother and was a very giving individual.

Source: richmondandtwickenhamtimes

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.  

A coroner will consider whether failings by police and hospital staff contributed to the death of a Hounslow student.
A coroner will consider whether failings by police and hospital staff contributed to the death of a Hounslow student.
Published 18th Jan 2016

Jagdip Randhawa, of Cranford , died in October 2011 after being punched during a night out in Leeds by semi-professional boxer Clifton Ty Mitchell.

Mitchell, then 21, of Derby, was jailed for seven years in 2012 after being convicted of the 19-year-old's manslaughter.

Concerns have also been raised about the standard of care he received at Leeds General Infirmary.

He was placed on a faulty ventilator , starving him of oxygen for 46 minutes, Liberty has said, and it has been suggested staff may have turned the alarms and indicators off meaning the fault was not identified sooner.

One expert described the care Mr Randhawa received as "appalling", claiming it was the worst case of medical negligence he had ever seen, according to Liberty.

Assistant coroner Kevin McLoughlin this week ruled the case engages Article 2 of the Human Rights Act, concerning the "right to life", following representations from Liberty.

That means the forthcoming inquest at Wakefield Coroner's Court will investigate not only how Mr Randhawa died but wider questions around the systems in place and the role of the hospital and police.

'Hopefully... no other family will have to endure this ongoing ordeal'

Jagdip's sister Manjinder Randhawa said: "We have been trying for years to find out the full circumstances around Jagdip's death.

"We still don't understand how the hospital and the police could have ignored the alarm signals – be they from the medical equipment or the offender's repeated breaches of bail.

"Thanks to the Human Rights Act we will finally be able to find out what happened. Hopefully the Article 2 inquest will mean the hospital and the police will learn lessons and no other family will have to endure this ongoing ordeal."

The date for the inquest has been set as August 22 2016.

Mr Randhawa was a former head boy at Cranford Community College and a promising American Football Player. He was in his second year studying English at Leeds University when he died.

Source: getwestlondon

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter. 
Royal Blackburn Hospital patient receives £230,000 in compensation after being ‘negligently’ discharged
Royal Blackburn Hospital patient receives £230,000 in compensation after being ‘negligently’ discharged
Published 18th Jan 2016

A hospital has been ordered to pay nearly £230,000 in compensation to a retired builder after sending him home while in pain and discomfort following surgery.

Within three days of the operation at Royal Blackburn Hospital, Robert Synclair had to be rushed back for further surgery to treat a ‘necrotic and perforated’ stoma, or opening, in his abdomen, the High Court was told.

The specialist who discharged Mr Synclair, 63, from Burnley, had been negligent, leading to a £227,529 award following a four-day civil trial.

An operation was undertaken, conducted by general surgeon Patrick Scott and Mr Zafar, assisted by a junior member of staff, after which Mr Synclair was returned to the ward.

He remained there for two days, but before his proposed discharge, he is said to have complained to Mr Zafar that he was in pain, feeling, sick and the stoma was dark rather than the usual bright pink in colour, the court heard.

His clinical notes recorded though he was feeling ‘well’ and his stoma appeared to be normal.

Giles Colin, representing the trust, said: “The judge failed to give any or appropriate weight to the entirety of the clinical records which, when properly understood, supported the accuracy of the critical note concerning the (morning) ward round.”

Mr Colin also claimed that Mr Synclair’s evidence regarding the colour of his stoma had been ‘inconsistent’, comparing his written statements and oral testimony given at the trial.

The court heard that the clinical notes were not made by Mr Zafar but his colleague, senior house officer Dr Dal Bianco, who was not called to give evidence at the original hearing.

However the patient’s wife Joanne, who did take part in the trial, confirmed her husband was ‘in some pain’, possibly had a high temperature and was complaining about his stoma.

Darryl Allen QC, for Mr Synclair, said there was clear evidence, due to his need for pain-relieving medication, that his client was still in discomfort immediately before he was discharged.

Mr Synclair was brought back to the hospital within three days by his wife, where the diseased stoma was sealed and an opening made on right side of his abdomen instead.

Dismissing the trust’s appeal, Lord Justice Tomlinson said: “The judge made proper use of the advantage afforded to him, of seeing the claimant and his wife give their evidence.

 “It may be that in the light of the wife’s unchallenged evidence, and in the absence of any evidence from Dr Dal Bianco, the judge could hardly have reached a conclusion other than that which he did.”

Source: lancashiretelegraph

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.  

Mum compensated by Hospital Trust after errors in post-surgery care led to blood clot on her lung
Mum compensated by Hospital Trust after errors in post-surgery care led to blood clot on her lung
Published 14th Jan 2016
Tina Grace, 44, told how she thought she was going to die after developing blood clot on her lung
– caused because she was sent home from hospital without blood thinning medication or
compression stockings after major surgery.
 
Tina, whose youngest child was two at the time, feared her children would be left motherless after
suffering the complication following a hysterectomy.
 
Three weeks after her operation, she suffered a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in her leg which then
travelled to her lung, causing a pulmonary embolism.
 
King’s Mill Hospital has admitted it should have prescribed anti-clotting medication and ordered
her to wear compression stockings when she was discharged, but failed to do so.
 
Miss Grace was hospitalised for 11 days as a result and had to take blood-thinning drug Warfarin
for six months after the clot, which she didn’t think she would survive.
 
She said: “I really felt like I could have died. I was terrified and it felt like every breath I took
would be my last.”
 
Miss Grace said the traumatic experience will live with her forever.
 
She had the hysterectomy on August 13, 2012, and was sent home five days afterwards.
 
She was very unwell and her parents, who questioned whether she should have been allowed out
at the time, had to move in to care for her, and her two children, who were then aged 2 and 13.
 
But three weeks after the operation, Miss Grace suddenly became very breathless and unwell, with
a burning sensation in her leg.
 
Her parents called an ambulance, and she was found to have had a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)
in her calf, which had broken up and travelled to her lung, causing the potentially-fatal blood clot.
 
Miss Grace had been at a high risk of developing a DVT as she had had major surgery, had been
immobile for several days afterwards, and was classed as overweight.
 
Dr Andrew Haynes, Executive Medical Director at Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
said: “The Trust accepted that the claimant should have been discharged with thrombo-
prophylaxis in August 2012, namely by the way of compression stockings and anticoagulation for
six weeks.
 
“Apologies were given in November 2012 and a financial settlement was reached.
 
“We wish the claimant well for the future.”
 
Source: Chad

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical

negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.  
 
Lorry driver wins £225k compensation after TWO GPs failed to spot nerve damage
Lorry driver wins £225k compensation after TWO GPs failed to spot nerve damage
Published 14th Jan 2016
A former HGV driver has secured £225,000 compensation after being left in permanent pain with
limited mobility because of the alleged failings of two GPs.
 
Martyn Wall, 54, from Marnhull near Sturminster Newton, injured his back five years ago
repositioning road signs in a lorry. He suffered Cauda Equina Syndrome and sustained irreversible
nerve damage.
 
He alleged that two Dorset GPs failed to identify his rapidly advancing neurological symptoms in
time and failed to refer him for prompt emergency treatment. He lost his job and has very limited
mobility, requiring shin splints and walks with the aid of elbow crutches.
 
The injury in May 2010 left him in such agony he saw a GP three days in a row - but was only given
pain medication. It got to the point where he was dragging himself around the house and getting
pins and needles in both legs.
 
He said six days after the injury his doctor saw him again and finally called an ambulance. He said
he was admitted to hospital where an MRI scan revealed he needed urgent surgery to try to save
his bladder and bowel function and as much mobility as possible.
 
"I've basically lost the majority of the feeling below the knees, I have very very limited foot
movement and I am on medication for my bowel and bladder," he added.
 
"The last five years has been a total nightmare. It's contributed to the break up of my marriage
and not able to work has been very frustrating. I've had five major back surgeries and I am in
constant pain. It gets to you - I feel totally depressed and down in the dumps. It's totally changed
my life."
The father of two added: "My boys want to play football and I can't do that with them - that's very
 
hard especially for the youngest - it's a job for him to understand why dad can't play."
Mr Wall added: "GPs need to know what to look out for. This is something which ruins lives."   
 
Source: bournemouthecho
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
 negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this
that you or your family may encounter. 

Teacher's caesarean death: Anaesthetist accused of 'failing in elementary task' as he and NHS Trust stand trial
Teacher's caesarean death: Anaesthetist accused of 'failing in elementary task' as he and NHS Trust stand trial
Published 14th Jan 2016
An NHS doctor failed to provide basic anaesthetic care that led to the death of a primary school
teacher during an emergency caesarean section, a court heard.
 
Frances Cappuccini, 30, affectionately nicknamed "Mrs Coffee" by her pupils,died at Tunbridge
Wells Hospital in Pembury, Kent, after giving birth on October 9, 2012.
 
Consultant anaesthetist Errol Cornish, 67, is charged with manslaughter after he failed to make
sure she was breathing properly, Inner London Crown Court heard on Wednesday.
 
Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust, which runs the hospital, is accused of corporate
manslaughter in the landmark case.
 
Mrs Cappuccini, from West Malling, Kent, died from a massive heart attack within hours of her
second son's birth after suffering major complications that led to her losing half her blood.
 
A second anaesthetist, Dr Nadeem Azeez, is also accused alongside Cornish of gross negligence
manslaughter, but is not on trial, having left the country and is understood to have returned to
Pakistan.
 
Mrs Cappuccini's family wept as prosecutor John Price said: "The two anaesthetists failed in what
we submit was the elementary task of protecting her airways in order to ensure that she recovered
from the operation, she reminded adequately ventilated, that air was going into her lungs."
 
Jurors heard how Mrs Cappuccini and husband Tom had travelled to Pembury hospital in the latter
stages of labour after her waters had burst.
 
She had suffered major complications giving birth to her first son, Luca, under complicated
circumstances and the couple had decided she would have a caesarean section.
 
Medical staff decided to progress with a normal delivery despite this, but she was later taken for
an emergency caesarean section and her son Giacomo arrived at 8.28am.
 
As the morning progressed, it became apparent that she had suffered a significant bleeding and
was breathing heavily, the court heard.
 
"Mrs Cappuccini was taken to the theatre at 11.35am on the morning of the 9th October," Mr Price
said. "This procedure was to be performed under general anaesthetic, that is to say she would be
rendered unconscious.
 
"The procedure of general anesthetic also required the insertion of a breathing tube into her
trachea or wind lip for which purpose medication was given to her to paralyse her muscles.
 
"During the operation it was discovered that the cause of the bleeding was the presence in the
uterus of residue placental tissue which should have been evacuated at the time of the birth but
was still present.
 
"That residual placental tissue was successfully removed. That appeared to resolve the problem.
 
"By 12.20 that afternoon, the team who had carried out the operation were satisfied and she was
left by them in the care of the anaesthetists whose job it was to bring her round and to restore her
own independent breathing efforts.
 
"That was at 12.20. Within four hours at 4.20 that afternoon Frances Cappuccini had died. At 3.16
she had gone into cardiac arrest and did not recover from that."
 
Mr Price added: "On her arrival at Pembury hospital the previous evening she had been a healthy
young woman. Her death was of course in these circumstances wholly unexpected.
 
"More than that it was wholly avoidable and it was clear from a very early stage that something
had to have gone very badly wrong."
 
Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust, which runs the hospital, denies corporate
manslaughter. It is the first time an NHS trust has been charged with the offence since its
introduction in 2008.
 
The charge states the trust had "failed to take reasonable care to ensure that the anaesthetists
involved in the care of Mrs Cappuccini held the appropriate qualifications and training for their role
and further failed to take reasonable care to ensure that there was the appropriate level of
supervision for the anaesthetic treatment of Mrs Cappuccini".
 
Mr Price said: "It is the prosecution case that what went wrong to cause the death of Frances
Cappuccini were very serious failings in the adequacy of the care and treatment she received from
two aneasthetists during that period.
 
"That their gross negligence caused her to die, caused her death."
 
He added: "At the outset so far as the case against the trust is concerned the prosecution must
first succeed in proving that either Dr Azeez or Dr Cornish or both of them by their gross
negligence caused the death of Frances Cappuccini."
 
Mrs Cappuccini, from West Malling, Kent, taught Year One pupils at Offham Primary School for
nine years before her death.
 
She left behind her husband Tom and their two sons Giacomo, now two, and five-year-old Luca.
 
Cornish, of Bromley, Kent, denies gross negligence manslaughter, while the health trust denies
corporate manslaughter. The trial continues.
 
Source: telegraph
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
 negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this
that you or your family may encounter. 

Montgomery Six Months On
Montgomery Six Months On
Published 11th Jan 2016

Following the Montgomery Case in March 2015 all doctors must now take “reasonable care to ensure that the patient is aware of any material risks involved in any recommended treatment, and of any reasonable alternative or variant treatments.”

This important case has impacts on most cases proceeding in regard to what consent the medical staff have given and the extent of what has been explained to the patient, this debate raises issues on the previously decided case law (previous cases) and its application(Montgomery Case) in a clinical negligence setting.

C&S Solicitors are specialists in Clinical negligence and can help advise you regarding these issues and how they may impact the treatment and consent given to you or a loved one.

Pensioner, 81, died after feed tube was connected to drip
Pensioner, 81, died after feed tube was connected to drip
Published 14th Dec 2015
Mr Walker was admitted to Wrexham Maelor Hospital on January 5 after collapsing at his home.
 
His condition gradually improved, but relatives were called to the hospital late the previous
evening after Mr Walker suffered a cardiac arrest.
 
Olive Warren, Mr Walker’s granddaughter, said Dr Peter Drew told her “something drastically
wrong” had happened and that he was “going to get to the bottom of it”.
 
A second granddaughter, Sarah Hallam, said Dr Drew told her that some food had got into Mr
Walker’s drip.
 
It was serious, he had not seen it happen before and he was not sure how it would be treated, she
said.
 
Dr Drew and a senior doctor told her that it was a horrific incident, where the food had caused clots
and Mr Walker would either recover or die in the next 24 hours.
 
When Miss Hallam asked a hospital staff member whether this was down to medical negligence,
they replied either “sadly yes” or “unfortunately yes”.
 
The police were later called, the inquest heard.
 
Mr Walker suffered another cardiac arrest at 1am on January 23 and died at 10.40am.
 
Coroner John Gittins heard that Mr Walker had been in good spirits when relatives visited him
earlier on the evening of January 22.
 
The inquest heard that he was due to be transferred to Mold Community Hospital in a few days.
 
Staff nurse Carol Hughes said that she installed the intravenous line to treat Mr Walker with
phosphate at about 6.40pm on January 22.
 
She had disconnected the line from Mr Walker’s hand to remove a watch as he had complained of
soreness, and then put it back.
 
There were no problems with the feeding tube and everything was connected properly when she
finished her shift that night, the inquest was told. The inquest heard how Mr Walker, who had had
an operation for a tumour on his jaw, had been a fit and active man until his collapse on January
5.
 
Dr Shepherd understood that on the day of Mr Walker’s death, staff nurse Jamie Keates had
discovered him collapsed and that the feeding system was connected to the intravenous line.
 
Although no food had been found in Mr Walker’s blood or organs, he said that it “seemed likely”
that at least some of the food had entered either before or at the time of his collapse. The cause
of death was cited as toxic shock due to intravenous infusion of a liquid oral supplemental feed.
 
Contributing factors were severe coronary artery disease, a blood disorder called polycythaemia
rubra vera and cancer of the mouth.
 
Source: leaderlive 
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter. 
Inquest rules 'seriously ill' patient restrained by Trafford General security staff was neglected before he died
Inquest rules 'seriously ill' patient restrained by Trafford General security staff was neglected before he died
Published 14th Dec 2015
A ‘seriously ill’ patient who was restrained by security staff at Trafford General Hospital was
neglected by the hospital before he died, an inquest ruled.
 
The inquest at Manchester Coroner’s Court, which lasted seven days, heard how Paul Stockton had
been restrained by security staff the day before he died and was not given a CT scan after
suffering a fall in the hospital.
 
The jury recorded a narrative conclusion of accidental death contributed to by neglect yesterday
(Tues).
 
Mr Stockton died aged 52 on October 18 2013 at the Manchester Royal Infirmary (MRI) but was
treated at Trafford General before he was transferred. The inquest also heard he could have been
saved if he was transferred sooner.
 
His daughters, who were originally told their dad died of natural causes, are relieved their
traumatic ordeal is over but feel ‘let down’ by the hospital Trust.
 
Molly Stockton, Mr Stockton’s youngest daughter, said: “I feel relieved with the verdict that my
father’s death was contributed to by the neglect of Trafford General. I feel like someone has
finally taken notice of what happened.”
 
Sophie Stockton, Mr Stockton’s eldest daughter, said: “I’m happy with the verdict. It’s now in black
and white that he died due to neglect and not as a result of anything he did.”
 
The family told how difficult it was to watch the CCTV footage of Mr Stockton being restrained by
security staff.
 
Daughter Lucy Stockton said: “Watching the CCTV footage was very distressing as we knew that this was the last 20 hours of our dad’s life and he just looked helpless, as if he was being treated
like a prisoner in a custody cell, not someone who was in actual fact seriously ill.
 
 “It was really upsetting and made us all feel helpless too.
 
“We feel very let down by the Trust as from the moment he walked into Trafford General until after
he died we feel that everything they did was wrong and they let him down, and let us all down as a
family.”
 
A spokesperson for Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which runs the
MRI and Trafford General, said: “We would like to offer our condolences to Mr Stockton’s family for
their loss.
 
“We accept the jury’s findings which reflect those of our internal investigation team that examined
the care Mr Stockton received at Trafford General Hospital shortly after his death.
 
“We continue to work on guidelines, policies and education of our staff to minimise the possibility
of a similar incident occurring in the future.”
 
Source: manchestereveningnews
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Nottinghamshire brain-damage boy to receive £6m compensation
Nottinghamshire brain-damage boy to receive £6m compensation
Published 14th Dec 2015
A 10-year-old boy who was left brain-damaged after hospital staff failed to spot low blood sugar
levels has been awarded £6m in compensation.
 
Bradley Albans of Nottinghamshire suffered hypoglycaemic brain damage two days after his birth in
May 2005 at Bassetlaw District General Hospital.
 
He was left physically disabled with learning difficulties and epilepsy.
 
Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Trust admitted liability, London's High Court heard.
 
The deal agreed at the High Court includes £6m in compensation to enable his family to provide
Bradley, who lives in Retford, with life-long 24-hour care.
 
Counsel for the NHS trust, Margaret Bowron, said Bradley had shown "enormous fortitude" and paid
tribute to the loving care shown by his parents, Rachel and Wayne, and his sister.
 
"He is frankly blessed to have them and they to have him."
 
Bradley's mother Rachel Albans said: "Finding out Bradley's brain damage was due to poor care
was extremely distressing and we have faced some difficult times.
 
"It is reassuring to know … that we can finally begin to move on with our lives and focus on
ensuring Bradley can benefit from the support that is now available to him.
"Our main priority has - and always will be - to ensure we can meet Bradley's needs and that he
has access to help and support he needs.
 
"However, we are very keen that lessons are learned to ensure that other babies in the same
situation get the care that they urgently need."
 
Source: BBC
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Oversized baby died after medics 'ignored mum's wish to have Caesarean'
Oversized baby died after medics 'ignored mum's wish to have Caesarean'
Published 10th Dec 2015

An oversized baby boy died after getting stuck during a forceps delivery when medics "ignored the wishes" of his mum to perform a Caesarean section, an inquest heard.

Rowena Smale, 32, gave birth to her son Oliver in March but his shoulders became wedged and he had to be resuscitated.

The next day, Rowena and husband Daniel, 38, from Hanwood, Shrops., had to make the heart-wrenching decision to turn off their son's life support machine.

A post-mortem revealed Oliver died from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy - a brain injury caused when he was starved of oxygen.

Rowena told an inquest she had been concerned about giving birth naturally because Oliver was a big baby so was booked in for a Caesarean near her due date in April.

But when she unexpectedly went into labour almost a month earlier on March 12 she was rushed to Princess Royal Hospital in Telford, Shrops.

She was given an epidural and Rowena asked medics for a Caesarean but the next day Oliver was delivered by forceps.

But he was starved of oxygen when his shoulders got stuck and despite being delivered soon afterwards he died the next day.

Rowena told Shrewsbury Coroners Court: "I felt my wishes were ignored."

In a statement read out by Shropshire Coroner John Ellery, Daniel said his wife had previously been told by doctors she would be able to have the kind of birth she wanted.

Daniel added: "I feel that our wishes as parents to have a Caesarean section were ignored.

"We were told we could have the delivery we wanted. That right was taken away from us."

Rowena's mother Myrtle Trevor, 61, who is a midwife and was at the hospital with her daughter, told the coroner her daughter had not been given a choice about the delivery.

She said Rowena had repeatedly asked for a Caesarean section, but was ignored.

She added: "I firmly believe if Rowena had had a Caesarean section, Oliver would be here with the family today."

Source: Mirror

Car crash victim in his 20s who suffered severe brain damage 'to get £4m compensation'
Car crash victim in his 20s who suffered severe brain damage 'to get £4m compensation'
Published 10th Dec 2015

Treatment: The victim is being treated at the Queen Elizabeth Foundation in Surrey

A man in his 20s who suffered severe brain damage in a car crash is to get more than £4 million compensation, lawyers say.

Jack Mitchell was 17 and studying to become an electrician when hurt in a crash six years ago, a spokeswoman for his family's lawyers said.

Mr Mitchell had been a front seat passenger in a Fiat Punto which was involved in an "horrific collision" in March 2009, the Novum Law spokesman said.

The driver, a friend of Mr Mitchell, had lost control after swerving to avoid a fox.

The spokeswoman said a £4.3 million care and support package had been agreed after discussions with insurers representing the driver.

Mr Mitchell, who lives in south-east London, had suffered multiple fractures to his left leg and severe brain damage, she said.

He had been treated at hospital and at a specialist rehabilitation unit after the accident.

But the spokeswoman said his family had felt "let down by the system".

"(Jack) suffered serious injuries in the crash, including multiple fractures to his left leg, lacerations to the back of his head and ear," they said.

"But the most severe damage was a traumatic injury to the frontal lobe of his brain.

"This has resulted in Jack suffering long-term, major, personality and behavioural difficulties leaving him with serious problems with his memory, ability to concentrate, planning and organising skills and suffers from aggression and anger management issues and extreme fatigue."

She said Mr Mitchell had spent three months in hospital and "just three weeks" at a specialist rehabilitation unit before returning to his family.

The spokeswoman added: "The family felt they had been let down by the system - Jack's physical injuries were healing but the extent and severity of the damage to his brain and the resulting serious behavioural and personality issues were not being addressed and they desperately needed professional advice and expert care and support for their son.

"It was clear to them that the severity of his brain injury meant that Jack would be unable to resume his college course or part-time job."

Mr Mitchell was working part-time at Morrisons supermarket at the time of the crash.

Mr Mitchell's mother, Frances Mitchell, said the years since the crash had been an emotional "roller-coaster".

"It is absolute agony to see your child suffer a brain injury and to watch them struggle every day," she said.

"Before his accident, Jack was a fit and healthy, motivated young man, hoping to qualify as an electrician and working part-time at Morrisons.

"Since the accident, we've had to come to terms with the fact that we have lost the Jack we knew and our lives will never be the same again."

"We are hugely relieved and happy that the case has now been settled and we can try and draw a line under the past six years and continue with Jack's rehabilitation and recovery."

Source: Mirror

Outrage as man with treatable condition sent home from hospital then dies six hours later
Outrage as man with treatable condition sent home from hospital then dies six hours later
Published 8th Dec 2015

An inquest into the death of Steven Jackson, who went to A&E over difficulties breathing and swallowing, also heard how an ambulance was called but reiterated he did not need hospital care.

The medical professionals failed to spot the 37-year-old was suffering from the potentially life-threatening condition sepsis.

Following a two-day inquest into his death, HM Coroner Caroline Beasley-Murray recorded a narrative conclusion and said: “There were very serious failings in the care Steven Jackson received from the ambulance staff. 

"With the appropriate and timely treatment Steven would most likely have survived.”

The steel erector had suffered a sore throat for several days and when the condition failed to improve his fiancee took him to A&E at Southend Hospital.

Around 7am on March 5 he was spoken to by an out-of-hours doctor who told him to purchase over the counter medication and sent him home.

Just three hours later, Mr Jackson's fiancee noticed his lips were pale and he looked purple.

An ambulance was called and paramedics spent an hour with him before diagnosing a virus.

At 1pm another ambulance was called but Mr Jackson suffered a cardiac arrest and died.

It was later found Mr Jackson was suffering from epiglottitis, the inflammation and swelling of the epiglottis behind the root of the tongue which is regarded as a medical emergency and can significantly restrict oxygen supply to the lungs and is treated with antibiotics.

Sandy Brown, EEAST Deputy Chief Executive and Director of Nursing and Clinical Quality, said: “We apologise again for the events involving the ambulance service and for the care we provided to Steven. 

"It has been determined by our own investigation and the coroner that he should have received appropriate care when we first attended him, following his visit to the out of hours doctor earlier that day.

“We met with Steven’s family last year which gave them the opportunities to share their concerns and rightly ask for answers. 

"Following our investigation and in the wake of Steven’s death, a number of actions we took included one-to-one training, a checklist for staff to complete to ensure it is suitable for a patient to be left at home, and making staff more aware of acute epiglottitis. 

"The coroner also raised the issue of training in sepsis recognition, which has been and remains one of our top priorities with staff.”

Southend NHS Trust said Mr Jackson did attend A&E there but was seen by the out of hours GP service located in the emergency department so they would comment on the specifics of the incident.

However, Denise Townsend, associate director of nursing and governance, said: “We would like to express our sincere condolences to Mr Jackson’s family for their tragic loss. Mr Jackson was seen and assessed by the out of hours GP service located at the hospital, not in the A&E department.”

Source: express

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.


Four-year-old girl died from sepsis after being sent home twice from A&E with paracetamol
Four-year-old girl died from sepsis after being sent home twice from A&E with paracetamol
Published 8th Dec 2015
A four-year-old girl died in hospital after twice being sent home from A&E with paracetamol for a
virus, an inquest has heard.
 
Little Mariam Hussan was on her third trip to Bristol Children's Hospital in a week when she
tragically succumbed to streptococcal sepsis.
 
Her dad Hussan Mohamed Hussan told an inquest how he had told doctors Mariam was "dying",
but wasn't seen for over two hours.
 
By the time she was reassessed by nurses, Mariam was already dangerously ill and she died just
20 minutes later, a court heard.
 
The inquest heard streptococcal sepsis is a rare but overwhelming infection, and consultants
agreed it is almost impossible to diagnose before it is fatal.
 
Mr Hussan told Avon Coroner's Court his daughter first became unwell on April 21 this year when
she woke up with a pain in her throat.
 
Her kept her home from nursery but two days later decided to take her to Bristol Children's
Hospital as she had a fever.
 
Mariam was sent home with painkillers after being diagnosed with a virus.
 
But by April 26, she was still sick and was unable to walk to the toilet or sit on it by herself, and
was complaining of pain in her head and legs.
 
Mr Hussan took her back to the children's hospital but was again sent home after being told
Mariam had a virus.
 
After another sleepless night, the four-year-old was "constantly asking for water" but could not go
to the toilet, the inquest heard.
 
Her father called 111 and an ambulance was sent.
 
Mariam arrived in hospital for a third time at 3.10am on April 27 and was assessed by a nurse and
told she would be seen by a doctor within an hour.
 
But after waiting for two hours, at 5.15am Mr Hussan noticed his daughter had deteriorated and
alerted a registrar.
 
Within 20 minutes, Mariam had a cardiac arrest and stopped breathing. She died an hour later.
 
Mr Hussan said in a statement: "I told the doctor that Mariam was dying, and I was told to wait in
the waiting area.
 
"But then her eyes were getting bigger and she was bubbling at the mouth."
 
Mr Hussan said he felt doctors had ignored him when he arrived in the emergency department.
 
But senior staff nurse in the emergency department, Jessie Ellis, said she believed the child was
triaged appropriately.
 
She said: "It was very busy in the emergency department that night.
 
"On those nights the gold standard is for them to be seen in an hour, but it would not be unusual
for patients to wait longer as patients with other priorities come in.
 
"The first time we were alerted to new concerns, we reassessed Mariam."
 
Senior coroner Maria Voisin recorded a verdict of natural causes.
 
Source:  Mirror
 
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negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust rated as “inadequate Overall and should be put in to special measures”
Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust rated as “inadequate Overall and should be put in to special measures”
Published 3rd Dec 2015
Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust rated as “inadequate Overall and should be put in to special measures” this is what the Care Quality Commission stated.
 
2 of the worst areas within the trust are Maternity and Paediatrics. Only last month all births were transferred from the Alexandra Hospital in Redditch to Worcester because of staff shortages. The A&E Department cover at Consultant level does not meet the Royal College of Emergency Medicines recommendations and the report from the Care Quality Commission states about Emergency “overcrowding in this area was an ongoing risk”.
 
The Care and Quality Commission also stated that when things did go wrong which is not unsurprising based upon the report’s findings the investigation in to it was found to be neither prompt or thorough. We would call upon the Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS trust to become more transparent and not let the inadequacy of the service and therefore patients not being treated properly and instead admit their failings quicker to allow patients to obtain redress quicker whilst they are alive to do so.
 
Worcestershire NHS trust serves 550,000 people and in 2014-2015 had a deficit of nearly £26 million. The lack of stability at board level within the trust is a great concern for the Care Quality Commission also along with their inability to run their budget properly. We wait to see if Chris Tidman and other members of the board will be asked to move by Monitor the body responsible for foundation trusts, or the NHS Trust Development Authority.
 
C&S Solicitors are contacted each week by people who have had treatment within the Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS trust where operations have gone wrong, fractures missed, delay in diagnosing cancer, gynaecological issues and ophthalmology cases just to name a few of the types of cases we currently run against Worcester, Alexandra and Kidderminster Hospitals.  
 
Contact C&S Solicitors if you or a loved one has been the unfortunate position of being treated negligently.
Payout for woman who claimed metal stitches set off rare phobia
Payout for woman who claimed metal stitches set off rare phobia
Published 3rd Dec 2015

A woman with a rare phobia of having foreign objects inside her body has received tens of thousands of pounds of compensation after she said that metal clips inserted into her neck during surgery left her feeling suicidal.

Sylvia Ramsay, 66, said she suffered panic attacks and had to undergo months of therapy to cope after learning that she had 25 metal clips in her neck following a thyroid operation five years ago.

The former special needs teacher claimed that her warnings about her condition had not been taken seriously by the consultant surgeon, Akinyede Ojo, before the operation which he carried out at the Spire Roding private hospital in Essex.

Mrs Ramsay said she had expected dissolvable stitches would be used in the operation and she suffered an immediate “jolt of panic” as soon as she realised that permanent clips had been inserted instead.

The clips were eventually removed in private surgery in 2013 after Mrs Ramsay said they were having a serious effect on her mental state.

But Mr Ojo has not accepted the allegation of negligence.

He denies Mrs Ramsay’s claim that he did not heed her warnings about the phobia and maintains that there was a misunderstanding.

“I know this is not a rational reaction but it is not something I can control,” said Mrs Ramsay.

“It's like putting an arachnophobe into a room full of spiders and telling them not to be so silly.”

She said that the fear of foreign objects had developed in childhood, and had dogged every medical appointment since.

“If I absolutely have to have an injection, I now need to see the needle go in and then see it's still intact when it comes out to make sure nothing has been left inside me,” she said.

She said before the thyroid operation, another doctor had already told her that an alternative procedure without clips was possible and that she had therefore told Mr Ojo that she did not want the surgery using clips.

When she woke up after the operation, she panicked seeing tubes inserted into her arms and tried to pull them out, but did not initially realise the clips were inside her.

It was only a year later, after she complained of breathing difficulties and went to see a specialist, that she saw an X-ray showing the clips inside her neck, she said.

“I can't remember getting home from that meeting,” she said.

“I can only explain the feeling as similar to when you have a near miss in a car accident, that jolt of panic, followed by feeling out of control.

“I know I went to my GP's surgery and told them there was metal inside me and they had to take it out.

“At that point, my GP began proceedings to section me under the Mental Health Act.”

She added: “I genuinely tried hard with the therapy for months, but it got to the point where I was making lists of things to do the next day so that I had a purpose to be alive day by day.

“I lived in constant fear that I would wake up to find more tubes or clips inside me.”

Mr Ojo said he could not comment because of patient confidentiality issues.

Source: Telegraph

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Coventry hospital admits mistakes leading to baby’s death
Coventry hospital admits mistakes leading to baby’s death
Published 1st Dec 2015
The devastated parents of a baby delivered stillborn have spoken of their heartache after
Coventry’s University Hospital admitted failures.
 
University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust has accepted it had failed to adequately
monitor her heart rate.
 
Zoe Andrews, from Longford, in Coventry and her partner Craig Hands say they will never be able
to get over the trauma of losing their daughter Evie on July 1, 2011.
 
The couple have now secured an undisclosed out-of-court settlement from UHCW.
 
Zoe, aged 18, had a normal pregnancy and she and Craig were looking forward to becoming
parents for the first time.
 
On June 29, Zoe was 32 weeks’ pregnant and was seen by her community midwife who detected
an ‘irregular’ heartbeat and referred her to the hospital for close monitoring.
 
However, the midwife at University Hospital thought the heartbeat was normal, despite long
periods of not being able to detect it. Zoe was discharged and went home.
 
The following morning Zoe could not feel her baby moving and became increasingly concerned as
she was usually very active.
 
She drank ice water and ate ice lollies to try and stir the baby, but nothing worked.
 
Zoe went back to the hospital that evening and was told her baby had died, and that she would
have to be induced to deliver stillborn Evie.
 
Zoe, who used to work as an events co-ordinator, said: “Craig and I were left completely
traumatised by Evie’s death.
 
“We are still struggling to come to terms with losing her even now.
 
“We were really excited.. we couldn’t wait to meet her.
 
“I was absolutely shocked at the complete lack of respect the nurses showed Evie and myself after
she was born. It stills haunts me to this day, seeing them hold and clean my daughter in a bucket
just after she was delivered – it was disgraceful.
 
“Since losing Evie, our lives have been turned upside down and I continue to struggle to come to
terms with losing her.
 
“I was unable to return to my job which I loved. I used to be very bubbly and outgoing but I know
feel like a completely different person.
 
“We are relieved that we were able to find some answers as to what went wrong whilst I was treated
at University Hospital.
 
“I am pleased that the Trust admitted failings which led to Evie’s death and even though nothing
will ever bring back our daughter, Craig and I can now focus on our children and rebuilding our
lives.”
 
Source: coventryobserver
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Unexpected death of Derbyshire mum to be probed
Unexpected death of Derbyshire mum to be probed
Published 1st Dec 2015
A coroner said he will explore how a mother-of-three was assessed by her doctor and staff at a
hospital's accident and emergency department as part of an inquest to her death.
 
Dr Robert Hunter told a pre-inquest hearing in Derby he also plans to instruct an independent
expert on neurology to produce a report as he explores how Julie Holden died.
 
Mrs Holden, from Kniveton, was only 48 when she died unexpectedly from a catastrophic bleed on
the brain in August 2014.
 
Her inquest was due to begin this morning at Derby and South Derbyshire Coroner's Court, but was
adjourned until the new year while additional evidence is gathered and assessed.
 
Mr Hunter, the senior coroner for Derbyshire, said: "I plan to explore a number of issues (when
the inquest starts).
 
"One is the general practioner's management of Mrs Holden.
 
"Second is Mrs Holden's assessment at the accident and emergency department and what her
partner was told about a possible CT scan and lumbar puncture when he asked whether they had
been done.
 
"Thirdly is the medical assessment management of Mrs Holden which we know from the
assessment in the neurological unit seems to focus on migraines and headaches.
 
"Fourthly why her blood pressure was significantly high when she was discharged from hospital.
 
"There was a decision to send her home with high blood pressure."
 
Source: derbytelegraph
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Compensation claims over a rogue surgeon who removed breast tissue from 250 healthy women won’t be heard until 2017
Compensation claims over a rogue surgeon who removed breast tissue from 250 healthy women won’t be heard until 2017
Published 1st Dec 2015
Victims of a rogue breast cancer surgeon fear some of his patients will die before receiving justice
following a decision to delay the hearing of compensation claims against him until 2017. 
 
Ian Paterson was suspended after he performed hundreds of unnecessary partial mastectomies on
more than 250 healthy women over a 15-year period.
 
An independent review revealed the 57-year-old also carried out 'cleavage sparing' mastectomies
on at least 450 other women, in which breast tissue was left.
 
Paterson pioneered the operations on women, leaving part of their breast behind solely for
cosmetic reasons - dramatically increasing the risk of their cancer returning. 
 
Compensation claims are being pursued by patients who Paterson operated on at several NHS and
two private hospitals in the Midlands.
 
High Court judge Mr Justice Foskett heard some claims against Paterson, Spire Healthcare Ltd and the Heart of England NHS Trust, have been settled.
 
But campaigners today raised fears some patients could die before they receive any damages
after it emerged seven leading claims would not be heard until January 2017.
 
Former patient Sarah Jane Downing, 46, hit out at the timetable for the cases to be heard, saying
she was 'terrified' some patients may not live to see justice done.
 
She said: 'It is very upsetting. It was ridiculous that it had taken so long already, and it is very sad
to think that if we have to wait this long for the first cases to be heard, will it be 2018 before the
majority are heard. ‘
 
Source: dailymail
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this
that you or your family may encounter.
 
C&S Solicitors are involved in the litigation for the victims of Mr. Paterson as such we haveaccess to
a litigation amnesty granted by the court. Therefore if you or anyone you know has been a victim
of Mr. Paterson at the Spire Group or through the Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust
(Heartlands, Solihull or Good Hope Hospitals)  please contact us urgently so that your claim can be registered with the court. We conduct these matters on a no win no fee basis.

Family receive pay out after man suffered brain injury during hospital admission
Family receive pay out after man suffered brain injury during hospital admission
Published 10th Nov 2015

Ross Askew who suffered a severe brain injury after choking on his own vomit while at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

The heartbroken family of a man who suffered a severe brain injury after choking on his own vomit at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, have been awarded an undisclosed settlement by the Trust.

Ross Askew, from Selly Oak, was admitted to hospital on New Year’s Day 2010 after suffering abdominal pains, and was diagnosed with severe necrotising pancreatitis.

The 33-year-old, who had also been battling a reoccuring brain tumour, was left needing 24 hour care after he began to choke on his own vomit.

He went into cardiac arrest, and his brain was starved with oxygen.

Now his devastated mother has spoken out about his ‘substandard’ care, after she received the settlement- although the University Birmingham Hospitals Trust would not admit liability for his care.

“Our family are completely heartbroken after losing Ross,” said his Mum Carol, who worked with lawyers at Irwin Mitchell to secure a settlement.

 “He was a fantastic young man with his whole life ahead of him.

“We believe that the standard of care he received during his admission at Queen Elizabeth Hospital was substandard and we were shocked at the quality of care he was given.

“We are bitterly disappointed that the Trust did not accept responsibility for the failings in his treatment.

“After he suffered the brain injury in early 2010, he needed 24-hour care as he wasn’t able to move independently or look after himself.

“Ross had a recurring brain tumour which he had coped with for a number of years.

“We are devastated that he was taken away from us so suddenly and it is incredibly difficult for us to come to terms with.”

After Ross suffered a brain injury he received treatment at the Queen Elizabeth hospital and later transferred to Moseley hospital specialist rehabilitation unit in April 2010.

He was discharged in August 2010 so that he could go home and be cared for by his family, and he sadly died in October 2011.

A UHB spokeswoman said: “University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust can confirm the settlement of a claim brought on behalf of Mr Ross Askew’s family and estate.

“A formal claim for compensation was made in 2013. Independent expert evidence obtained by the Trust supported the standard of care provided by its doctors.

“We note with sadness that Mr Askew died in October 2011 from complications relating to a brain tumour which was entirely unconnected with the treatment he received on the High Dependency Unit at Selly Oak Hospital in January 2010. We offer our sympathies to the Askew family.”

Source: birminghammail

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.


Crohn's Disease sufferer taking legal action after being left in searing agony
Crohn's Disease sufferer taking legal action after being left in searing agony
Published 10th Nov 2015
Graeme Cross, 31, from Richmond, North Yorkshire, was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease in 2003.
The incurable condition involves the body’s immune system attacking the digestive organs, which
can cause severe inflammation, pain and other complications.
 
His symptoms were severe enough to need medication and surgery to manage his condition.
 
Mr Cross's treatment was initially cared for at Darlington Memorial Hospital, but while his surgeon
was abroad in 2012 his care was transferred to James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough.
 
He started to suffer severe abdominal pain, which was thought to be a bowel obstruction, and
underwent surgery in July 2012, following which he suffered an internal leak in his bowel which was
not detected for nine days.
 
The day after his operation he felt a sudden, searing pain in his abdomen, causing him to scream
out in pain.
 
Over the following hours he developed a large swelling in his abdomen and experienced severe
crushing pain. For about a week he was vomiting blood and faeces and repeatedly had to ask for
pain relief. 
 
Surgeons performed urgent surgery and found a leak in his bowel. But he had already developed
life-threatening sepsis and his parents were told he may not survive the following 24 hours.
 
His damaged bowel was removed and he was left with a stoma. After time in intensive care and
the high dependency unit he was discharged. But his solicitors say he was sent home with a wound
partially opened and three days later was readmitted with a wound infection.
 
Mr Cross suffered from numerous infections and was eventually discharged from hospital care on
June 1, 2013. Since then he has required further lengthy surgery, taking muscle from his thigh to
try and reconstruct his abdomen.
 
He continues to struggle with the psychological impact of the events of his surgery in 2012.
 
No comment has yet been made available from South Tees Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.
 
Source: thenorthernecho
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this
that you or your family may encounter. 
Harrogate brain damaged boy awarded nearly £10m
Harrogate brain damaged boy awarded nearly £10m
Published 10th Nov 2015
A six-year-old boy who suffered brain damage at birth as a result of medical staff errors has been
awarded nearly £10m in compensation.
 
Kit van Berckel, from Harrogate, North Yorkshire, was diagnosed with dyskinetic cerebral palsy
shortly after his birth in 2008.
 
Harrogate NHS Foundation Trust had admitted a delay in delivery caused him neurological injuries.
 
It also apologised for failings in the standard of care offered to the family.
 
Kit's mother, Joanna van Berckel was admitted to Harrogate Hospital 10 days over her due date, in
May 2008.
 
However, medical staff failed to recognise the baby was suffering distress for a prolonged period of
time during delivery.
 
Kit van Berckel was born with no heartbeat and needed resuscitating.
 
The brain damage he suffered led to him being diagnosed with cerebral palsy.
 
Mrs van Berckel said: "We were devastated and heartbroken when we found out that Kit's condition
could have been avoided if mistakes had not been made during his delivery.
 
"Kit is a bright, cheerful and lively boy who continues to amaze us with his energy, positive attitude
and determination."
 
He is unable to sit without help, has no independent mobility, cannot feed himself and is unable
to speak.
 
The settlement of £9.872m, approved at Leeds High Court, will provide provide him with lifelong
care and rehabilitation.
 
Harrogate NHS Foundation Trust said in a statement the settlement had been "amicably" agreed.
 
Charles van Berckel, Kit's father, said: "A cloud is lifted and the future is bright for ourselves, Kit
and his brothers."
 
Source: bbc
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Wife was beating cancer then a bug from a dirty hospital tap killed her
Wife was beating cancer then a bug from a dirty hospital tap killed her
Published 9th Nov 2015
Heartbroken Rene Dee says battler Eileen died just five days after contracting lethal infection at
Royal Sussex County Hospital.
 
A heartbroken husband watched his wife die just days after she caught an infection from a dirty
hospital room.
 
Eileen Dee was being treated for cancer and was given a good prognosis before she caught the
bug.
 
Traces of drug-resistant bacteria pseudomonas aeruginosa were found in water running from the
tap and in the shower drain in her room, along with several others on the ward.
 
Concerned for her health, doctors ¬transferred Eileen, 68, from the Royal Sussex County Hospital.
But there were no notes explaining she had been exposed to the potentially lethal infection.
 
Five days later, the retired NHS information manager was dead.
 
Measures including a thorough review of cleaning rounds were put in place at the Royal Sussex
after an outbreak of the same infection in 2010.
 
But an internal Serious Incident Investigation found only about a third of hospital housekeepers
were cleaning to the required standard when Eileen died.
 
Her widower, retired chief executive Rene, 69, said: “It was such a shock.
 
“One minute everyone was telling her how well she was doing and the next moment I am watching
her struggling to breathe. It happened so quickly.”
 
Eileen was diagnosed with acute myloid leukaemia and initially, after watching her mother die from
cancer, opted for palliative care. But, relatively healthy and with a good predicted response, she
decided to go into hospital for chemotherapy.
 
Rene, from Brighton, said: “She was very scared about going through the process of what her
mother went through, which was very long, drawn-out and unpleasant.
 
“They were just about to introduce her to another lady, of a similar age, who had been through the
same condition and had successfully come out the other side.
 
“That was just about to happen and then suddenly she was gone.
 
 “Eileen has missed out on the prospect of being a grandmother, which is something she would
have loved. One of the most difficult decisions I have had to make was when to get my son,
Matthew, home from overseas. But by the time I was very, very sure he should, and phoned him
to say ‘get over here now’, it was too late.”
 
Eileen died in August 2013. Her cause of death was recorded as pneumonia but the Royal
Sussex’s report says the coroner should have been made aware of the infection.
 
Rene is now suing the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals Trust for clinical negligence.
 
Source: mirror
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this
that you or your family may encounter.

Wife dies of organ failure 6 days after being sent home from hospital with painkillers
Wife dies of organ failure 6 days after being sent home from hospital with painkillers
Published 9th Nov 2015

Susan Sedgwick, 53, was diagnosed with gallstones after a physical examination, but was sent home with co-codamol without any further tests.

A beloved wife died of multiple organ failure just six days after being sent home from hospital with painkillers.

Susan Sedgwick, from Hopwood, Birmingham, visited the Queen Elizabeth Hospital suffering severe abdominal pain.

The 53-year-old was diagnosed with gallstones after a physical examination, but was sent home with co-codamol without any further tests.

Six days later her devoted husband Bob switched off her life support machine at the Alexandra Hospital in Redditch, after Sue collapsed from multiple organ failure.

Mr Sedgwick has spoken out  in the hope that he can stop anyone else going through his trauma.

The gallstone, which was lodged in her pancreatic duct, had caused acute pancreatitis leading to her organs shutting down.

“I am very angry,” said Bob, who married Susan in 1997. “A simple operation would have saved her life.

“Now I have no wife and no future.

In a statement the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust said: “The Trust offers its sincere condolences to Mr Sedgwick on the death of his wife, Susan.

Source: mirror

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Moped rider wins £145,000 compensation after Bournville horror crash left her partially paralysed
Moped rider wins £145,000 compensation after Bournville horror crash left her partially paralysed
Published 9th Nov 2015

A Birmingham woman has been awarded £145,000 compensation after a terrifying car crash left her partially paralysed.

Sarah Forbes, 30, was driving her moped along the Bristol Road South, near Bournville Police Station, when a driver pulled out from a side road and crashed into her in July 2011.

 She was rushed to nearby Queen Elizabeth Hospital where doctors confirmed she had dislocated her hip, her sciatic nerve had been crushed, and part of her left foot was paralysed.

Three days later she underwent surgery to put her hip back into its joint and two plates and pins were inserted to hold it in place.

Sarah, from Northfield, said: “I was having flashbacks for about a year and a half. I can remember very clearly the moments after I got hit and before I hit the ground.

“The overwhelming thought was of that advert when the guy hits the bonnet and thinking it was happening to me. I just couldn’t believe she hadn’t seen me.

“It was all in slow motion, and then after I hit the ground it all sped up.”

Following the accident Sarah worked to bring a claim against the driver, and insurers recently admitted full liability on behalf of the driver.

The six-figure settlement will be used by her for further treatment, as she will inevitably need more surgery in the future.

In the meantime Sarah is now getting back on track after winning a place on a graduate scheme at energy company Centrica.

She said: “I’ve always been a really independent person, so it’s taken a while to adjust to the fact that I now have to rely on a stick and a wheelchair to get around. I’ve also had to come to the realisation that sometimes I do need help and I’m still learning to take it when it is offered.”

Source: birminghammail

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Husband of woman who died 'needlessly' after varicose vein surgery is awarded six-figure sum
Husband of woman who died 'needlessly' after varicose vein surgery is awarded six-figure sum
Published 5th Nov 2015

A husband whose wife died 'needlessly' two days after varicose vein surgery has been awarded a six-figure compensation pay out.

Bosses at the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital issued an apology to Chris Tweedy, in the wake of the death of his wife Nicola.

The 54-year-old suffered a fatal blood clot in her lungs and died just two days after the procedure.

An inquest heard medics at the hospital failed to carry out a basic thrombosis risk check because of an 'oversight'.

Mr Tweedy claimed at the time of the inquest that his wife's death could have been prevented. 

In their apology to the family, hospital bosses conceded they 'could have done more' to save the mother-of-two.

The hospital's chief executive, Anna Dugdale, told the family: 'We could have done more and our care could have been better.' 

Mr Tweedy, a postman from Pulham Market near Diss, Norfolk, said: 'I'm happy that the NHS Litigation Authority has decided that it cannot and will not defend the N&N hospital in regards to the care they provided to my wife.

'I'm satisfied that the N&N have learnt from this tragedy. I'm also satisfied that these lessons will be shared and learnt on a national basis.

'The chief executive has now given us as a family, a full, unreserved and sincere apology which we have accepted.

'I know the N&N does a great deal of good work, that their staff do care and that they work extremely hard in very challenging circumstances. Unfortunately and tragically it all went wrong for Nicky.

'I say to all patients, make sure you know the risks, make sure you know whether you are at increased risk and, if you are, make sure the hospital tell you what they are doing to minimise that risk.’

The hospital was subsequently criticised by an independent expert appointed to look at the hospital's protocols and the care provided to Mrs Tweedy, a classroom assistant.

The report described the protocols as being 'very hard to defend' and 'needing to be reviewed urgently'.

The N&N Hospital have produced an action plan to take account of the recommendations made by the independent expert and the concerns raised by the coroner. 

Ms Dugdale, added: 'We are very sorry for the sad death of Mrs Tweedy. 

'I have offered Mr Tweedy and his family my sincere apologies. 

'We are committed to continuously improving the care we provide to our patients and I am certain that we have learned from this tragedy and have introduced changes that will benefit future patients.'

Source: dailymail

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Doctors failed to spot my cancer 25 times
Doctors failed to spot my cancer 25 times
Published 5th Nov 2015
Kim Major says the year-long delay in diagnosing the illness left her with just six months to live
 
A mum who went to her GP surgery 25 times claims she has been handed a “death sentence” after
doctors failed to spot she had cancer.
 
Kim Major says the year-long delay in diagnosing the illness left her with just six months to live.
 
During the string of visits to the surgery the mum of two claims she was turned away and told she
had a virus. On one ¬occasion she was even advised to see a ¬psychiatrist for her “anxiety”.
 
It was only when Kim, 48, had X-rays and blood tests in A&E after struggling to breathe that she
discovered she had terminal lung cancer.
 
She said: “Each day I’m grateful to wake up. My son thinks chemotherapy is going to mend me.
 
“He said to me, ‘You’re going to fight aren’t you?’ And I said, ‘Of course I am.’
 
 “But I know the ¬medicine might let me down. It’s heartbreaking to tell your children you might
not be here next year. I feel like I’ve been given a death sentence.”
 
Kim, from Epsom, Surrey, first visited her local Fitznells Manor Surgery in September 2013
complaining of recurring ¬headaches, dizziness, coughing, chest and neck pain.
 
She was not given cancer tests despite going back 24 times.
 
By the time A&E doctors spotted the cancer in September 2014, Kim had a tumour on her lung, two
tumours in her brain and two in her liver.
 
Kim, who works in ¬international operations for Streetwise Couriers, said: “I don’t want to cry but
sometimes I can’t stop.
 
“I’m 48, I pay my taxes and I go to work. I just feel totally ¬abandoned by the people I should
have been able to trust to care for me. It’s just so awful for the family, it’s ripped our hearts out.
 
“I could not believe what I was hearing when I was told I had lung cancer but to make matters
worse it had been left undiagnosed for so long it had spread to my lymph nodes and to my brain.
 
“I do not know how long I have left but my condition is ¬deteriorating and I am worried for my son
who will be left without his mum. I am struggling to come to terms with my diagnosis and what the
future has in store for me.”
 
Kim has now launched a lawsuit against the surgery claiming medical negligence.
 
A spokesman for Fitznells Manor Surgery said: “The surgery was saddened to hear of this case
and our thoughts go to the family. Due to patient confidentiality, we are unable to comment
further.”
 
Source: mirror
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical
negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Court rules man's death after spinal surgery was a result of medical negligence
Court rules man's death after spinal surgery was a result of medical negligence
Published 4th Nov 2015

A family has been awarded an undisclosed payout in compensation after a court ruled the death of a father was a result of medical negligence.

Dean Bircham, 51, from Roydon, died five years ago, a week after undergoing spinal surgery at Rivers Hospital in Sawbridgeworth.

In a hearing at the Royal Courts of Justice, his 55-year-old widow Julie was awarded an undisclosed sum, reported to be seven figures.

Mrs Bircham has five children, including a 16-year-old who requires round-the-clock care for cerebral palsy. The payout will help provide for her.

In a written statement, Mrs Bircham said: "Losing Dean so suddenly has been absolutely devastating for our family.

"We hoped the surgery would relieve the pain which he had been dealing with so stoically for many years.

"Dean was an amazing father and did everything he could to ensure that our children were happy and enjoyed life. They are all still struggling to come to terms with his death. He was a very active dad who made everything so much fun for the children."

IT worker Mr Bircham had a history of back pain and sciatica, and had surgery in the 1990s.

In 2010 he was referred to Ahmed Hussein, who recommended the procedure that proved fatal. It was found, however, that Mr Bircham was not properly informed of all the risks.

During the operation on September 23, 2010, a vein was damaged, leading to major blood loss and two amputation procedures.

It was found that Mr Hussein had failed to seek immediate help from a vascular surgeon and wrongly continued the surgery when the vein was in close proximity to the spine.

Mr Hussein did not attempt to defend the claim.

Mrs Bircham said: "Lauren, who is now 16, had a close bond with her dad and the impact on her since Dean's death has been significant.

"Before Dean died, Lauren was included in everything we did as a family. We used to work as a team to support Lauren, and if she was in pain or upset, we were both able to help her.

"She is now rarely able to come out with us as a family as it is too difficult for me to manage her physical needs without Dean's help."

"Dean was a fit and healthy man despite his back condition, and he would always ensure that his family's needs were put first, especially those of his youngest daughter, Lauren."

Source: harlowstar

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Jack Adcock trial: Nurse guilty of six-year old's manslaughter
Jack Adcock trial: Nurse guilty of six-year old's manslaughter
Published 4th Nov 2015

A nurse has been found guilty of the manslaughter of a six-year-old boy whose resuscitation was mistakenly called off.

Jack Adcock, who had Down's syndrome, died of a cardiac arrest at Leicester Royal Infirmary in February 2011.

Portuguese-born agency nurse Isabel Amaro, 47, was found guilty of manslaughter by gross negligence.

The jury is deliberating on the same charge for two other medics - Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba and nurse Theresa Taylor.

Jack, who had a heart condition, was admitted to the hospital with pneumonia and died from a cardiac arrest after sepsis was triggered by a bacterial infection about 11 hours later.

The trial has heard the boy's death was caused by "serious neglect on the part of the doctor and the two nurses".

They failed to recognise his body was "shutting down" due to sepsis and close to death, the prosecution claimed.

Nurse Amaro, who had worked with children for 20 years, accepted she breached her duty of care but denied any of her failings were criminally negligent or significantly contributed to the youngster's death.

The prosecution had said Amaro's record-keeping of the boy's life signs, regarded by experts as basic nursing practice, had been "woefully inaccurate".

The court was also told that Dr Bawa-Garba - who along with Ms Taylor denies the manslaughter charge - had mixed him up with another patient and mistakenly believed he had a "do not resuscitate" order.

She ordered resuscitation to start again a few minutes later, after another doctor checked the boy's notes.

She previously told the court working without a break may have led to the mistake.

Source: bbc

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Victim of horrifying head-on car crash wins £4m compensation for accident that left him too angry to work
Victim of horrifying head-on car crash wins £4m compensation for accident that left him too angry to work
Published 4th Nov 2015

A 26-year-old man left unable to speak and 'too angry to work' after a head-on car crash has been awarded £4million after an eight-year legal battle.

Paul Vallance suffered a serious brain injury at the age of 18 after a driver lost control and ploughed into his car in Wiltshire, but doctors did not realise the full extent of it for years.

The debilitating brain damage was dismissed as a ‘mild head injury’ and when he returned to work he lost a series of jobs because of his sudden bursts of anger with customers.

Paul Vallance suffered a serious brain injury at the age of 18 after a driver lost control and ploughed into his car in Wiltshire, but doctors did not realise the full extent of it for years.

Mr Vallance's undiagnosed brain injury left him unable to exercise self-control or use appropriate language and he was regularly fired for losing his temper.

His mother Tina, said: 'My loving son had been replaced by a much angrier, hostile young man.

'He would spend hours just staring at himself in a mirror, saying repeatedly 'I look like Paul, but I don't feel like Paul'.

'My heart was in bits seeing him like he was back then.

'Several retail positions followed in quick succession but Paul just couldn't cope.His mother Tina said her son was replaced by a much angrier, hostile young man and he was fired from a string of different jobs 

He spent 19 days in hospital after the 2006 crash which happened on a country lane near his home in Marlborough.

The former trainee manager physically recovered from a broken leg, shoulder and nose but also suffered from amnesia, lost the ability to speak and was confused.

Those classic signs of a serious brain injury were missed when the insurance companies first dealt with his compensation claim months later.

His mother said her son dramatically changed in the weeks and months after the crash.

When he began to string words together again, his language was aggressive and abusive.

He had suffered a cerebral oedema, intra-cranial hematoma and subdural haemorrhage, all of which damaged his emotional control and executive functioning.

This had left him with behavioural difficulties and anger management issues.

The case went to the High Court, where the £4million pay-out has now been agreed.

'We are thrilled to have secured justice for Paul which will help finance the specialist care and support that he will need for the rest of his life.'

Paul is now in a specialist care unit in Wigan in Lancashire.

Source: dailymail

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Girl who suffered brain damage during birth awarded millions
Girl who suffered brain damage during birth awarded millions
Published 3rd Nov 2015

A young woman who has to live with the "profound and devastating" of brain damage suffered during her birth will receive millions in compensation.

The 15-year-old was starved of oxygen during the of her birth at the midwifery unit in Penrith Hospital in 2000, Mr Justice Jay told London's High Court today.

The trust today agreed to settle the case on the basis of 80 per cent liability.

That means the teenager will receive a £1.75m lump sum, as well as index-linked and tax-free annual payments to cover the costs of her care for life.

Those payments will start off at £20,000-a-year until she turns 22 before rising to £45,000-a-year as her needs increase.

Her birth injuries has had a 'profound and devastating effect over the years', said Mr Justice Jay, who gave his 'wholehearted' approval to the settlement.

The girl's cerebral palsy means she can walk 'no more than 100 yards before encountering difficulty', the court heard.

Her parents would receive £50,000 as some compensation for the "considerable sacrifice" they have made for her over the years.

The couple travelled to London from Cumbria today and sat alongside their tearful daughter as the settlement was approved.

Her barrister, Martin Spencer QC, said the money would "help her future".

And Margaret Bowron QC, for the NHS trust, described the teenager as a "splendid young lady who has made the absolute best of what life has thrown at her".

She was a 'real credit' to her parents, the barrister added.

Source: newsandstar

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Husband of dementia patient filmed wife receiving substandard care
Husband of dementia patient filmed wife receiving substandard care
Published 3rd Nov 2015

The husband of a dementia patient at Warminster Hospital secretly filmed his wife receiving substandard care.

John Duffey suspected his wife wasn't being treated properly so installed a camera to keep an eye on her. He said he is shocked by the nursing standards at Warminster.

It shows a nurse trying to feed the 73 year old while she is sleeping. A nurse coughing into a tissue at the sink and bringing it back to Mrs Duffey's beside. She proceeds to use it while giving her food. Finally, two nurses using the bottom bed sheet rather than a slide sheet to move Marion.

An independent medical-legal nurse, whose company has provided expert witnesses in more than fifteen thousand negligence cases.

Marion Duffey's treatment would fly in the face of any hospital's policies.... her care was substandard, exposing her to unnecessary risk of skin damage and choking, and ignored her human rights.

Source: itv

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Prison officer awarded £500k after slipping on ice
Prison officer awarded £500k after slipping on ice
Published 3rd Nov 2015

An ex-prison officer, who can no longer walk after slipping on ice while on dog patrol, has been awarded a £500,000 payout.

Simon Butler, from Peterborough, Cambridgeshire suffered a nasty blow to his right ankle when he fell at HMP Woodhill, near Milton Keynes in December 2009.

Since then, he has been plagued by constant pain and has a 25 per cent chance of it being amputated, London’s High Court heard.

The 47-year-old has been medically retired from the prison service and is now forced to rely on his son and wife.

The once super-fit sportsman and his wife were close to tears as the judge told the court how he could no longer play cricket with his son because of his injuries.

Mr Butler sued over an alleged negligent failure to grit the area where he fell and the Ministry of Justice accepted that he should be compensated.

Judge Rosalind Coe QC, who awarded him £496,717, told the court: ‘His quality of life was critically dependent on the ability to walk.

‘He and his son used to go to training and would spend time together going to matches, playing cricket or kicking a ball around.

‘None of that has been happening since the accident.’

Mr Butler was granted the right to return for more compensation if his condition deteriorates.

Source: metro

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Family's fury as 56-year-old grandfather dies 'after doctors failed to tell him he had swine flu'
Family's fury as 56-year-old grandfather dies 'after doctors failed to tell him he had swine flu'
Published 2nd Nov 2015
A grandfather recovering from leukaemia died after a doctor failed to tell him he had swine flu, it has been claimed.

Gerard Cahill's family claim a medic knew he had the illness for five days before he was started on treatment. By then, it was too late.

They believe he could still be alive if he had been given swine flu treatment as soon as lab tests confirmed he had the illness.

His daughter Stacey McJimpsey said: “If he took it, he might still be here.”

Gerard had been due to walk Stacey down the aisle at her wedding. Instead, she carried a photo of him in her bouquet.

The alleged mistake happened while Gerard, 56, was being treated as an out-patient at the Beatson cancer centre in Glasgow

“We want to know who made the mistake and why it happened.

“We complained to the General Medical Council but they can’t investigate until they know who the doctor is and seven months after our dad died, the Beatson still haven’t given us the information.”

The family are taking legal action to get the information they require so they can sue for negligence.

Stacey said: “We just want answers and to ensure this can’t happen to any other family.”

Source: Mirror
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as
medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events
similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Family of pensioner who died following failed operation awarded payout
Family of pensioner who died following failed operation awarded payout
Published 2nd Nov 2015

Martyn Rogers died of blood poisoning and acute liver failure a week after undergoing surgery to remove tumours from his liver.


Martyn Rogers died of blood poisoning and acute liver failure on July 25, 2012, a week after undergoing surgery to remove tumours at Cardiff’s University Hospital of Wales.


Cardiff and Vale Health Board have since admitted the 66-year-old suffered damage to a major vein during the procedure.


The board added that Mr Rogers was also wrongly booked for an “unnecessary” repeat colonoscopy, which further delayed his treatment.


Following Mr Rogers’ death, the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) commissioned a report which found the surgery showed evidence of “poor judgment” and “technical errors” and reflected “poor 

operative skills”. It concluded the pensioner’s death was avoidable.


The General Medical Council (GMC) then opted to place restrictions on Mr Rogers’ surgeon, Prof David Paul Berry, in March 2013.


He is no longer allowed to perform the procedure given to the Newport resident, known as Hepatopancreaticobiliary surgery.


A Cardiff and Vale University Health Board spokesman said: “Mr Berry is not currently carrying out any clinical duties for the health board pending the conclusion of the health board’s internal 

procedures.”


Maria Davies, Mr Rogers’ partner of 40 years who is now suffering from ill health herself, has spoken out about the need for improved patient safety.


She said: “Martyn had suffered bowel cancer since 2010 along with liver metastases but we were led to believe that the surgery would remove the tumours and ultimately prolong his life.


“It was heartbreaking to see Martyn deteriorate in front of my eyes following his last surgery with Dr Berry; especially as I could see he was in so much pain and there was nothing I could do to comfort 

him.


“To learn that Martyn’s death could have been avoided and one of the surgeries he was given was actually unnecessary is very difficult to comprehend and has left me feeling angry and frustrated.


“I am still left with many questions as to why his treatment was so poor and have concerns that many others may have been affected as the RCS report suggests.


“Throughout the investigation, we also found out that Martyn was wrongly booked in a completely unnecessary repeat colonoscopy which further delayed his treatment.


“We are pleased that the GMC have decided to extend his practicing restrictions until next year, but hope that this continues for a much longer period of time.


“Neither myself or my family feel that we have secured justice for Martyn and we will continue to campaign and search for answers and I hope by highlighting what happened to Martyn that we are able 

to ensure that no further people will suffer from the same substandard care as he did.”


Source: walesonline

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as
medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events
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Family devastated by paramedic's 'failings'
Family devastated by paramedic's 'failings'
Published 28th Oct 2015

A heartbroken fiancee has described the agonising moment her partner died following “serious failings” by paramedics.

Following a two-day inquest at Chelmsford Coroner’s Court it was concluded that Steven Jackson would have survived if he had been given better treatment.

Steven, 37, passed away from epiglottitis on March 5, 2014. He attended the accident and emergency department at Southend Hospital around 7am, complaining of difficulty breathing and swallowing.

An out-of-hours doctor told him to purchase over the counter medication and sent him home but just three hours later, his fiancee had to call an ambulance as his condition continued to deteriorate.

At 10am, an ambulance was called to his home as his condition deteriorated, with his fiancee describing that he looked pale with purple lips.

Paramedics spent an hour assessing him before diagnosing a virus and saying he did not require hospital treatment.

Three hours later, after another ambulance was called at around 1pm, he suffered a cardiac arrest and died.

His fiancee Shelley Jackson, told the inquest: “There are no words horrific enough to describe that horrendous day. Steven’s life was disposed of by incompetence and neglect. Steven was failed, we were all failed.

 “My life has a big dark hole that can never be filled. I have lost my finance, my soul mate, my best friend and my children’s role model.

“I still believe that Steven would still be here today if the correct procedures were followed.”

Source: southendstandard

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as

medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events

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Boy left severely disabled after being starved of oxygen at birth receives £6.5m compensation payout
Boy left severely disabled after being starved of oxygen at birth receives £6.5m compensation payout
Published 28th Oct 2015
A boy left severely disabled after being starved of oxygen during his birth has been awarded £6.5
million in compensation.
 
The family of Daniel Spencer have spoken of their ‘huge relief' after the decision at Birmingham
High Court.
 
The 13-year-old was diagnosed with severe athetoid cerebral palsy shortly after he was born at the
Worcester Royal Hospital.
 
He is now unable to walk, reports the Birmingham Mail.
 
But his family, from Malvern, learnt the mistake could have been avoided as medical staff failed
to respond when his mum, Sue, suffered a rupture in the placenta, and Daniel’s heart rate began
fluctuating.
 
They have finally been awarded the seven-figure sum to help Daniel with life-long care and
rehabilitation.
 
“Daniel is a wonderful boy and he continues to amaze us with the progress he has made over the
years,” said his father Oliver.
 
“We will be able to use the funding to provide vital care and rehabilitation for Dan for the rest of
his life.
 
"He uses specialist equipment and therapies to help him on a daily basis, which can be very
expensive.
 
“We were devastated when we found out that Daniel’s condition could have been avoided had
mistakes not been made during his birth.
 
 “It’s a huge relief knowing that the settlement will provide for a secure future for Daniel and that
his specialist care needs will be met for the rest of his life.
 
“While we will always help out where we can, he needs the support of experts in the field who can
help him to achieve as independent a life as possible.”
 
 
Source: mirror
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as
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Leeds mum in fight for NHS compensation more than a decade after ‘contaminated’ epidural jab
Leeds mum in fight for NHS compensation more than a decade after ‘contaminated’ epidural jab
Published 26th Oct 2015
Leeds mum, who claims her life has been ruined by a contaminated epidural jab she was given
during labour, has won the right to claim massive damages from the NHS.
 
Kara Rayner, 36, went into Kent’s Medway Maritime Hospital in 2004 for what should have been the
routine birth of her first child.
 
But she was given an epidural to relieve her pain, which she claims left her without sensation in her
legs and with agonising pain rushing up her spine and into her head.
 
Ms Rayner, who was 24 at the time, successfully gave birth but was readmitted to hospital three
weeks later suffering from hydrocephalus – water on the brain – and underwent emergency surgery
to drain the fluid.
 
She has since suffered with an inflammation affecting the brain and spinal cord that her lawyers
blame on the epidural.
 
Speaking about the jab this week, she told the High Court: “I immediately knew that something
was wrong and began to panic.”
 
Despite her symptoms, it was not until August last year that she issued a damages claim against
Medway NHS Foundation Trust as it was only in 2012 that an expert first suggested that the
probable cause of her disabilities was the contamination of the epidural with an antiseptic called
chlorexidine.
 
The trust argued she had left it too late to sue – the normal time limit in medical negligence cases
is three years.
 
But High Court judge Mr Justice Wilkie said she had been “assiduous” in pursuing her claim and it
would be wrong to stop her case. No date was set for the full hearing.
 
Source: yorkshireeveningpost
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as
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Mum awarded compensation after rare throat problem was misdiagnosed for a decade
Mum awarded compensation after rare throat problem was misdiagnosed for a decade
Published 26th Oct 2015
A mum-of-three who received a substantial payout from her health board after her rare throat
problem went undiagnosed for more than a decade says doctors robbed her of her childhood.
 
Gwenllian Hill, who has had more than 30 bouts of surgery to temporarily open her airways, claims
she was so out of breath at times that she couldn’t even read a bedtime story to her children.
 
The 34-year-old has now set up a charity to help raise awareness of her condition, which typically
affects premature babies who need a tube fitted into their windpipe, also known as intubation.
 
“It ruined 10 years of my life,” she said.
 
“It’s like constantly breathing through a straw. At times I sounded like Darth Vader. I couldn’t even
read my children a bedtime story because I was so breathless.”
 
Mrs Hill, from Whitchurch, Cardiff, first began experiencing breathing problems when she fell
seriously ill at just 14 years old.
 
 “I had a really rare autoimmune disease where all my organs began to shut down,” she said.
 
“I was put in intensive care and intubated to control my breathing. I started to get better for the
first 12 months but then my breathing started to become really bad.
 
“Doctors said I simply had asthma and I used an inhaler for nine years, but it had no benefit at
all.”
 
But when Mrs Hill fell pregnant with her first child in 2005, doctors discovered the mum-to-be had
airway stenosis, a narrowing of the airway caused by scar tissue developing through her intubation.
 
So three days after the diagnosis – and 29 weeks into her pregnancy – doctors opted to give Mrs
Hill a surgical procedure known as a balloon dilatation, where a balloon is placed inside the trachea
to open up her airways temporarily.
 
And against the odds, Mrs Hill gave birth to her precious daughter at 34 weeks, weighing 3lb 6oz,
after opting to have an elective caesarean.
 
“My daughter was okay, but she had hard time in the womb,” she added.
 
“I then decided to have two more children even though doctors warned me not to because of the
high risk involved.”
 
Mrs Hill, who was forced to drop out of university due to the condition, opted to sue Cardiff and
Vale University Health Board for medical negligence in 2010 after her subglottic stenosis was left
unnoticed for a decade.
 
She won her court battle and was given an undisclosed fee in damages, which allowed her family to
buy their first home.
 
Five years on from hearing, the 34-year-old is now preparing for a tracheostomy in September,
where a tube will be fitted directly into her neck to avoid breathing through her windpipe. She
claims the procedure would never have been needed if doctors had immediately identified her
condition.
 
“If they’d have caught it straight away then there would not have been any long-term damage,”
she added.
 
Dr Graham Shortland, the Medical Director for Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, said: “The
health board would once again like to apologise to Mrs Hill for what happened.
 
“We accept that the former Trust missed opportunities in Mrs Hill’s childhood to diagnose and treat
her condition.”
 
Source: walesonline
 
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Diabetic patient seeks compensation from trust after leg amputation
Diabetic patient seeks compensation from trust after leg amputation
Published 22nd Oct 2015

Brenda Curtis, from Thatcham, suffers with Type 1 diabetes and chronic kidney disease - which means she undergoes haemodialysis three times a week.

The 57-year-old was admitted to the Royal Berkshire Hospital on October 20 last year following a fall in which she suffered a fractured pelvis.

Three days later, it was noted that she had a grade three pressure sore on her heel, but she was not seen by a specialist tissue viability nurse and there was no mention of the sore on her discharge letter a week later.

During the following months, Mrs Curtis underwent repeated hospital treatment for sores which became infected leading to her undergoing a below knee amputation in February this year, almost four months after she suffered the fall.

The couple, who have received apologies from the NHS trust but not acceptance of formal liability, are seeking further answers about the care provided and compensation to help them adapt their home to make it more suitable for Mrs Curtis's situation.

Mr Curtis said: "It was just so shocking how quickly the problems with her heel sores escalated. In four months Brenda had gone from being treated for a fall with a blister on her heel, to having infected pressure sores needing days and days in hospital, and ultimately an amputation.

"We feel that the issues could have been better managed. The first discharge letter didn't mention pressure sores at all and there were other things wrong on the letter such as recording the wrong type of diabetes which is extremely worrying. We've just lost all confidence and I want Brenda to get the best possible support and rehabilitation she can so that she can begin to move on from this."

Source: littlehamptongazette

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Hospital failed to diagnose Barrow man's cancer
Hospital failed to diagnose Barrow man's cancer
Published 22nd Oct 2015

A widow has settled a claim against the trust which runs Furness General Hospital after doctors failed to spot her late husband's throat cancer. 

The woman's husband was treated in the ear, nose and throat department at FGH over a number of years for throat problems. He suffered from a hoarse voice, a painful throat and swallowing difficulties. 

Various investigations were carried out, including vocal cord biopsies and CT scans, but no firm diagnosis was made. In February 2013 examination by the surgeon found a lump on the side of the man’s neck. He began to suffer from weight loss and continued to have a sore throat and swallowing difficulties.

Despite all of these suspicious symptoms the staff at the hospital failed to diagnose the condition and the patient's problems worsened. In the autumn of 2013 he was finding it difficult to swallow solid foods. 

The man and his wife eventually became so concerned that the investigations at Furness General Hospital were inadequate and asked their GP for a referral for a second opinion.

The patient was seen at Blackpool Victoria Hospital in January 2014 and was immediately diagnosed as suffering from a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx.

The cancer was by this time so far advanced that palliative treatment began. Sadly, he passed away in June 2014.

Investigations and expert evidence confirmed that with proper treatment, the man's cancer ought to have been diagnosed in the spring of 2013; and had that have happened it was likely that his life would have been extended by two to three years, and that he would have benefited from better palliative care which would have eased the suffering he went through.

Dr David Walker, medical director at the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, said: “On behalf of the Trust, I’d like to offer my sincere apologies to the family for the treatment that their loved one received at Furness General Hospital leading up to his sad death in 2014.”

Source: nwemail

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Mum whose tragic son's cancer was missed by doctors for SIX months gets apology from Jeremy Hunt
Mum whose tragic son's cancer was missed by doctors for SIX months gets apology from Jeremy Hunt
Published 22nd Oct 2015
It took six months for GPs to spot Denton Lee Wyatt's bowel cancer. Now his mum has received a
handwritten apology from the Health Secretary
 
A grieving mum has received a handwritten apology from health secretary Jeremy Hunt after
doctors failed to spot her son’s cancer.
 
Musician Lee Wyatt was just 25 when he died of bowel cancer in 2010.
 
He was repeatedly misdiagnosed during almost six months of visits to his GP practice.
 
Suffering abdominal pain and struggling to eat, the Denton DJ and music producer was initially
prescribed painkillers after being told he had pulled a muscle playing tennis.
 
He was also given iron tablets after it was found he was severely anaemic and it was suspected
that he had an ulcer.
 
Fears that Mr Wyatt had cancer were finally confirmed in December 2008 but a scan failed to detect
the illness had already spread to his liver.
 
This led to him having a 14-hour operation at Stepping Hill Hospital to remove his bowel, spleen
and part of his pancreas.
 
An independent oncologist looking into the case has since found the operation was ‘inappropriate
and excessive’.
 
Last year Mr Wyatt’s mother Linda, 56, received an out-of-court settlement of £10,000 after a joint
action against Stockport NHS Foundation Trust and the Windmill Medical Centre, in Denton, for
alleged medical negligence.
 
Stockport NHS Foundation Trust expressed sympathy with the family.
 
A spokesman said: “In the time since, our MRI scanners have been upgraded and we believe
lesions could be correctly classified with far greater confidence.”
 
Source: manchestereveningnews
 
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Hospital negligence contributed to death of Karlysle Bryan, 14, from Loughton
Hospital negligence contributed to death of Karlysle Bryan, 14, from Loughton
Published 21st Oct 2015

The death of a previously ‘tremendously healthy’ teenager whose appendix burst was contributed to by hospital negligence, an inquest has found.

If proper assessments of Karlysle Bryan’s condition had been carried out, ‘on the balance of probabilities’ the 14-year-old would have been referred to a surgery team, said coroner Nadia Persaud.

His life would have been saved, said Ms Persaud as she concluded an inquest into his death yesterday (October 20).

Karlysle died on the morning of October 21 last year after first becoming unwell less than a week before.

He was seen at Whipps Cross hospital in Leytonstone on October 20, but was sent home after medical staff failed to diagnose his peritonitis, thinking it was instead gastroenteritis.

The two-day inquest found that Karlysle, of Debden Broadway, died of ‘natural causes contributed to by negligence’.

Returning the verdict, the coroner said his condition “clearly required medical attention” when he attended hospital but a number of failings were made.

Incomplete and unclear medical observations were made on paper, and the notes could not later be found on the hospital’s computer system.

If a full and detailed assessment of his condition was made on October 20, said Ms Persaud, “I accept that on the balance of probabilities Karlysle would have been referred to the surgery team before his appendix perforated… Karlysle would have survived.”

At the inquest, his father Patrick Bryan said Karlysle was previously a “tremendously healthy” teenager.

Karlysle’s mother Lyndsey McKay said: “When I saw him lying there, if I could change places with him, just spare him for me. 

“You know, I cannot manage being without him, all because they did not do the damn tests they should have done. Why?’’

Source: guardian-series

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Devastated mother told she was expecting a healthy baby girl is awarded £21,000 compensation after giving birth to a severely disabled son who died at
Devastated mother told she was expecting a healthy baby girl is awarded £21,000 compensation after giving birth to a severely disabled son who died at
Published 21st Oct 2015

An expectant mother gave birth to a severely disabled baby boy who survived for just two days - despite being told she was expecting a healthy baby girl.

Sara Billany was devastated when medics revealed her son Kyle had been born with Edwards' syndrome, a rare genetic condition that meant he was 'incompatible with life'.

The 34-year-old had been overjoyed, when at her 20-week scan, medics at Scarborough General Hospital, told her she was expecting a healthy baby girl.

In fact, the scan showed clear signs of the condition, including cysts on Kyle's brain, a strawberry-shaped skull and excess fluid surrounding the baby, according to experts.

The mother-of-three, from Scarborough, has since been awarded £21,500 in compensation after the hospital admitted liability.

After discovering she was expecting a girl, Ms Billany decided to name her new arrival Kianna, began buying girls clothes and painted her spare bedroom pink. 

Weeks before her due date, Ms Billany expressed concerns that her baby was not moving as much as she expected.

But she said an obstetrician told her the baby's lack of movement could be due to the fact Ms Billany had a low-lying placenta.

When she gave birth in May 2010, Ms Billany said she was shocked to discover she had been carrying a baby boy.

He was whisked away by medics who had to resuscitate him immediately.

Later, Ms Billany was devastated to learn her son had Edwards' syndrome. Medics said her son 'had no capacity for life', and after 53 hours Ms Billany had to make the difficult decision to turn off Kyle's life support machine.

'Watching Kyle suffer was the hardest thing I have ever had to go through,' said Ms Billany, also mother to Keira 13, and Sonny, three.

'I was told I was carrying a healthy baby girl. I decorated my spare bedroom pink and bought flowery clothes for her to wear and I named her Kianna.'

Due to her low-lying placenta, Ms Billany was closely monitored and underwent a scan at 34 weeks.

'I was told the baby was going to be around 8lb, but when Kyle he was born he weighed just 3lb 13oz,' she recalled.

'He was whisked away immediately and had to be resuscitated. I could see the top of his head as they were trying to help him breathe. I thought it was my fault.'

Hours later Ms Billany was told that her son had Edwards' syndrome and that he had no chance of survival. 

She was able to spend two days with her baby before his life support machine was turned off.

A spokesperson from York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust said: 'We are pleased that a settlement has now been agreed in this case. 

'We have apologised to Ms Billany for the standard of care she received and the impact this has had on her.'

Source: dailymail

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Staffordshire hospital admits liability after woman dies of blood poisoning
Staffordshire hospital admits liability after woman dies of blood poisoning
Published 21st Oct 2015

A pensioner from Staffordshire died after a vein was torn in a botched operation that doctors failed to diagnose until the following day.

Ethel Sanders from Burntwood died at Queen’s Hospital in Burton after suffering from multi organ failure, internal bleeding and blood poisoning due to a two-month delay in receiving surgery and poor care afterwards.

Now the hospital has admitted its mistakes and agreed to pay her family a five-figure sum as compensation.

Her daughters today called on Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which runs the hospital, to improve services for the elderly after she suffered months of agony before her death.

The trust has admitted breaching its duty of care to the 85-year-old and has agreed to pay the family an undisclosed five-figure settlement.

Mrs Sanders' daughters Linda Ward and Sandra Neal say they remain 'deeply concerned' by standards within the trust and said lessons must be learned.

The trust was placed in special measures by the Care Quality Commission last year as part of a review into death rates at a number of hospitals across the country.

Dr Craig Stenhouse, medical director at the trust, said "This is an extremely sad case and we are truly sorry that the care and treatment given to Mrs Sanders was not of the standard that our patients deserve.

"We completely accept that the quality of care provided was inadequate and we have taken immediate action to make changes."

Source: dailymail

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Bereaved family win out-of-court settlement with Addenbrooke's and Colchester hospitals
Bereaved family win out-of-court settlement with Addenbrooke's and Colchester hospitals
Published 20th Oct 2015
Mackenzie Cackett, 4, died in May 2012 after battling brain and spinal tumours. His parents Danielle, 32, and James Cackett, 36, from Halstead, Essex, have argued ever since that doctors should have spotted the tumour more quickly.
The two hospitals where he was treated have now reached an out-of-court settlement with the family and admitted the original tumour should have been detected earlier.
Trainee teacher Mrs Cackett, who is also mother to 16-month-old April, said she wished she and her construction worker husband had challenged doctors at the time and urged other parents to learn from the tragic case.
"In our minds we will always think 'what if?' It's hard not to be angry," she added.
"He wasn't given the best fighting chance and that's something we have to live with.
"There's a lot to be said for a parent's instinct. I think we knew deep down that something was wrong, but we trusted the doctors."
"Nothing is going to bring Mackenzie back, but it's important to us that lessons are learned so nothing like this can happen to anyone else."
"No amount of money can ever make up for what this family has been through, but I hope this brings them some closure and they can now try and move forward with the rest of their lives."
A spokesman for Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust said it was pleased that the claim had been resolved.
He added: "The trust would again like to pass on its most sincere condolences and sympathy to Mackenzie Cackett's family.
"Early in 2011, in response to a complaint from his mother, the trust apologised in writing to her for a series of breakdowns in communication. The trust is working very hard to ensure that the quality of its healthcare services continues to improve and that lessons are learnt after mistakes are made."
Source: Mirror
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Family settlement for Walsall Manor Hospital death after medics failed to diagnose patient three times
Family settlement for Walsall Manor Hospital death after medics failed to diagnose patient three times
Published 20th Oct 2015

The family of a 30-year-old Walsall man who 'died in agony' after medics failed to diagnose his conditions three times have received an out-of-court settlement.

Bus driver Andrew Raybould died after suffering from severe pancreatitis, sepsis and multi-organ failure at Walsall Manor Hospital in February 2012.

His parents Geoff and Maureen from Aldridge said he had been discharged from the hospital three times previously without a diagnosis.

Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust accepted he should not have been discharged in the January and lessons have been learned following the death of Mr Raybould.

Mr Raybould first began suffering symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and constipation at the end of December 2011.

On January 3, 2012 his GP referred him to Walsall Manor Hospital for investigations as to the cause of his symptoms but was sent home.

By the end of January he had lost two stone in weight and was in constant severe pain. After being admitted to Walsall Manor again, he was eventually diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, acute renal failure and sepsis.

Mr Raybould was admitted to the intensive care unit on January 29, but he was too ill to undergo surgery and his major organs began shutting down. He died on February 2.

Amir Khan, medical director at the trust, said: “We have offered our full and unreserved apologies for the failings identified in relation to the care Mr Raybould received which we accept fell below the trust’s usual high standards.

“Our thorough investigation concluded that further investigations should have been undertaken and that Mr Raybould should not have been discharged on January 14, 2013.

"We also concluded that communication should have been made clearer for both the patient and his family around arrangements to return to hospital if he continued to feel unwell. We accept that communication could also have been improved with Mr Raybould’s family as his condition deteriorated."

Source: expressandstar

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Family of botched spinal surgery victim from Roydon awarded 'seven figure pay-out'
Family of botched spinal surgery victim from Roydon awarded 'seven figure pay-out'
Published 20th Oct 2015

The family of an "amazing father" who died after botched spinal surgery have been awarded a reported seven figure pay out.

Dean Bircham, 51, from Roydon, died in September 2010, one week after going under the knife at Rivers Hospital in Sawbridgeworth.

And in a hearing on Thursday last week at the Royal Courts of Justice, his widow Julie, 55, was awarded an undisclosed fee, reported to be seven figures, after it was found Mr Bircham's death was a result of medical negligence.

Mr and Mrs Bircham have five children, including 16-year-old Lauren who requires round-the-clock care due to cerebral palsy and the pay-out will help provide for her.

In a written statement, Mrs Bircham said: "Losing Dean so suddenly has been absolutely devastating for our family.

"We hoped the surgery would relieve the pain which he had been dealing with so stoically for many years.

"Dean was an amazing father and did everything he could to ensure that our children were happy and enjoyed life.

"They are all still struggling to come to terms with his death. He was a very active dad who made everything so much fun for the children."

'I sued my doctor for missing my breast cancer' - Patient reveals her heartache after GP dismissed lump

Source: Hertfordshire Mercury

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Doctor sued for missing breast cancer
Doctor sued for missing breast cancer
Published 20th Oct 2015

Following the news that UK doctors have been offered cash incentives to lower the number of patients referred for more thorough cancer checks, Jayne Murdoch, 46, tells about when she was sent home from the GP after finding a lump in her breast. What followed was one of the most traumatic situations of her life...

My heart thudded loudly when I first felt a lump in my breast while having a shower. Just six years earlier I’d watched my mother Jean die of breast cancer at the age of 75. I was only 41, but feared the worst.

The next day I made an appointment with a new GP I’d just signed up with after moving in with my partner Richard, 47. I just wanted to make sure nothing was wrong.

The GP examined me and didn’t seem at all concerned. He said: "There is nothing to worry about, it’s just a fibrous lump."I’d told him about mum’s diagnosis, so when he was quick to dismiss my lump, I relaxed.

Then he asked a second doctor to come in to take a look. He immediately agreed it was nothing as well, so afterwards I went home to Richard and felt grateful to forget about it. Life was hectic with my job as a desktop publisher and we were keen to start a family now. But over the next few weeks and months the lump grew.

Puckering that had formed below my nipple also worsened. I started to feel uneasy again and 10 months later, in January 2011, I booked another appointment – this time with a female GP. When she examined me, her reaction was very different.

The shock on her face told me everything I needed to know and she immediately referred me to hospital. "I am very surprised your GP didn’t pick up on this earlier as it’s very obviously a sign of cancer," she said. "Especially with your family history."

After Jane had a successful recovery she opened a case against the doctor; the doctor admitted he was negligent in not referring me to hospital straight away. This was monumental and I felt as if I could breathe again.

In March 2014, a settlement was reached as it was accepted I’d proven both negligence and that my treatment would’ve been different if I’d been diagnosed earlier.

Source: mirror

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Families to sue over loss of loved under care of surgeon linked to 'avoidable deaths'
Families to sue over loss of loved under care of surgeon linked to 'avoidable deaths'
Published 15th Oct 2015
Two families who lost close relatives after treatment by a surgeon at Leicester General Hospital are taking legal action.
 
They have spoken of their devastation at finding out they might have had more precious time with loved ones after an investigation into their treatment under the care of consultant Professor David Berry.
 
The doctor, who worked at Leicester's hospitals from August 1999 to February 2011, was suspended from Cardiff's University Hospital of Wales in January 2013 after being linked to the "avoidable deaths" of eight patients he operated on there.
 
Dennis Setchell, from Barrow upon Soar, had successful bowel cancer surgery in 2007.
 
During his treatment, it was discovered he had liver mestastases and he was referred to Prof Berry.
 
He had surgery to remove part of his liver.
 
He had three operations but died on October 2, 2008, aged 77.
 
Following an investigation by the Royal College of Surgeons, the family was told by Leicester's hospitals that the findings stated the decision to operate was inappropriate.
 
Mr Setchell had twice been told there was only a two per cent risk of mortality, when in fact the risk was 98 per cent.
 
Anne Lovell, who worked in midwifery , was referred to Prof Berry at Leicester General Hospital after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in August 2003.
 
She was advised to have part of her pancreas removed as the cancer was in its early stages.
 
She was in theatre for more than 10 hours and died 72 hours later. She was 66.
 
It was only after an investigation by the Royal College of Surgeons that her son, Andrew, from Northampton, found out his mother's entire pancreas had been removed.
 
He said: "This all happened 12 years ago and it has left me feeling shocked and bitter.
 
"My mother did not give consent to this operation.
 
"As a family, we have spent a lot of time grieving over the loss of my mum and now it feels as though we have to start the whole process again.
 
"We were led to believe the operation was going to help her."
 
Source: leicestermercury
 
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Barnsley family urges health watchdog to take action against GP
Barnsley family urges health watchdog to take action against GP
Published 15th Oct 2015

The family of man who died of a heart attack after being told by his GP the pains were a chest infection is urging the General Medical Council to hold the doctor to account.

Gary Newsome, of Hartington Drive, Honeywell, Barnsley, died in 2011 - four days after seeing his doctor and within hours of being reassured over the phone he merely had an infection. After settling a medical negligence claim against the doctor concerned, Mr Newsome’s family are now urging the GMC to complete an investigation which has gone on for more than a year.

Mr Newsome had developed chest pain and shortness of breath in July 2011 made an appointment to see GP Dr John Harban at the Lundwood Medical Centre on Pontefract Road, Barnsley.

In the four day period before his death his condition didn’t improve and it is claimed he complained of ‘breathlessness’ and ‘pains’ in his chest.

The family claim that Mr Newsome struggled to eat, felt nauseous and that his brother commented that his skin was grey in colour and his lips were turning blue.

Mr Newsome later contacted his former partner and told her that he ‘felt terrible’ and would return to the doctors’ the following day.

Unfortunately, He was found dead at his home on July 19 2011.

A post mortem examination later revealed Mr Newsome had suffered an acute heart attack.

An inquest into his death took place in 2013 and coroner, Chris Dorries, in recorded a narrative verdict.

He said: “Mr Newsome was seen in surgery by a doctor later that afternoon.

“On the basis of expert evidence there were significant failures during this consultation.

“In consequence, Mr Newsome’s condition was not diagnosed at a time when his life was likely to be saved by hospital treatment.”

Source: thestar

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter. 

Inquest: Baby would have survived if he had been delivered by failing midwives just 30 minutes earlier
Inquest: Baby would have survived if he had been delivered by failing midwives just 30 minutes earlier
Published 15th Oct 2015

A coroner has tragically found that a baby would have survived if he had been delivered just 20 to 30 minutes earlier.

Hospital failures led to the death of baby Casey Garrett just seven hours after he was born said senior coroner for Bedfordshire Thomas Osborne.

At the end of a two day inquest, at Ampthill, Mr Osborne returned a narrative verdict saying: “Prior to his delivery at Bedford Hospital there were a number of failures to recognise that his condition was deteriorating and there was a failure to escalate the levels of care so as to expedite his delivery.

“These failures resulted in a lost opportunity to deliver him earlier and avoid his death. He died on 11 September 2015 at 7.10am from perinatal asphyxia.”

The coroner will also be meeting with the hospital’s chief executive to ensure safe procedures are being adhered to.

Casey’s mother, Anna Garrett, was admitted to Bedford Hospital on September 10, 2014 for the birth of her first child. The baby boy was born later that evening but was not breathing. He was resuscitated and transferred to the neonatal unit, but died seven hours later in his parents’ arms, after being christened by a priest.

The hospital trust carried out an internal inquiry identifying several failings including breaches of its own guidelines, in particular a failure by the midwives to call for medical assistance when there was, amongst other things, lack of progress in the second stage of labour and failure to interpret the baby’s heart rate properly.

Speaking after the inquest parents Dean and Anna, of Bromham, said: “We feel very let down by the staff at Bedford Hospital who we had placed the utmost trust in. However, we feel that Casey’s death has been a pivot for change and agree with the coroner that his short life has and will make a huge difference to the safety of patients. We could not have wished for a more open inquiry.

“We are both so very grateful for the short time we spent with Casey. He was the most beautiful baby boy and he changed our lives forever. It is true that the smallest footprints have the power to leave an everlasting imprint on this earth, only Casey left his deepest footprints in our hearts.”

A statement released by Bedford Hospital NHS Trust following the hearing said: “The Trust deeply regrets the tragic death of baby Casey and we would like to extend our sympathies and apologies to the parents at this very difficult time.

“Following detailed external investigations, commissioned by the Trust, we have implemented a range of recommendations to help prevent such a case from happening again in the future. We will continue to undertake further work to ensure these actions are fully embedded.

“The Trust accepts the Coroner’s conclusions.”

Source: bedfordtoday

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter. 

Three patients died at Walton Centre hospital after being medicated with the same sedative
Three patients died at Walton Centre hospital after being medicated with the same sedative
Published 14th Oct 2015
Family of victim Neil Murphy say he would still be alive had he not been given so much anaesthetic called propofol
 
Three young patients at Liverpool’s Walton Centre hospital died in the space of 48 hours after suffering sedative ‘overdoses’.
 
The family of one Bootle teenager who was killed believe their loved one would still be alive today if he had been given a smaller dose of an anaesthetic called propofol.
 
Neil Murphy, 18, suffered massive head injuries after he was attacked in Netherton in June 2010 and died several days later in the Fazakerley-based neurology unit.
 
But Mr Murphy’s death certificate was re-issued last year to include propofol infusion syndrome – a recognised complication of long-term propoful use – as one of the causes of his death, alongside blunt force head injury.
 
The Walton Centre earlier this year paid Mr Murphy’s grieving family £10,000 in an out-of-court settlement to recognise the “potential contribution of propofol infusion syndrome in relation to Mr
Murphy’s death”, although the trust did not admit liability.
 
Mr Murphy passed away on June 9, 2010 – the same day as Christopher Garwell, 23, from Deeside, also died at the Walton Centre following a head injury he suffered during an attack in Chester.
 
These two deaths came 48 hours after 22-year-old teacher Susan Chiverton, from Lymm, Cheshire, also died at the Walton Centre. She had been hit by a motorbike while crossing a road.
 
All three patients had been given propofol at the Walton Centre.
 
Mr Murphy’s aunt Jacqueline, a retired psychiatric nurse from Bootle, said: “Neil would have survived the head injuries had he not been given a massive overdose of propofol.
 
 “I want a new investigation into everything because I don’t want this to happen to any other people – three young people have died after they were given propofol. It’s a disgrace.
 
Source: liverpoolecho
 
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Coroner criticises three-hour delay in treating baby born at North Manchester General Hospital
Coroner criticises three-hour delay in treating baby born at North Manchester General Hospital
Published 14th Oct 2015
Devastated Rachel and Jacob Olsberg, from Prestwich, believe their son could still be alive if he had been given vital antibiotics sooner
 
A severely-ill newborn baby boy died of an infection after waiting three hours for antibiotics which could possibly have saved his life.
 
The delay in administering the drugs to Baby Olsberg following his birth at North Manchester General Hospital was a ‘serious failure’ which may have contributed to the risk of him dying, an inquest heard today.
 
His devastated parents Rachel and Jacob, from Prestwich, believe their son might still be alive if he had been given the antibiotics within an hour – as national guidelines recommend.
 
Baby Olsberg was born on December 23, 2013, but, after initially appearing well, his condition started to deteriorate.
 
Shortly after 10pm, he was seen by a doctor who noted he was struggling to breath and decided he need antibiotics.
 
But they were not administered until around 1am, the inquest at Rochdale Coroner’s Court heard.
 
As Baby Olsberg’s condition deteriorated further, doctors decided to transfer him to the specialist intensive care unit at Royal Oldham Hospital.
 
But he suffered three cardiac arrests and died in the afternoon on Christmas Eve.
 
Today’s inquest heard how expert witness Professor Benjamin Stenson, an experienced consultant neonatologist, prepared a report on the incident in which he called the delay in administering the antibiotics a ‘serious failure’.
 
Giving evidence, he added it was possible that the drugs could have saved the baby Olsberg’s life.
 
Source: manchestereveningnews
 
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Grieving husband launches legal action against Croydon NHS trust after death of pregnant wife following 'shocking' treatment delays
Grieving husband launches legal action against Croydon NHS trust after death of pregnant wife following 'shocking' treatment delays
Published 13th Oct 2015

A grieving husband has launched legal action against Croydon's NHS trust after his pregnant wife died following a "shocking" nine-hour delay in critical treatment.

Masood Khalid, 46, believes mother-of-two Fauzia Khan, 43, would have survived if doctors had acted quicker to administer drugs for an infection caused by a miscarriage.

Mrs Khan, of Oakfield Road, West Croydon, died of multiple organ failure triggered by sepsis after being admitted to A&E at Croydon University Hospital in November 2013. 

Her husband did not learn until last month, at an inquest into her death, that a "communication gap" meant doctors delayed giving Mrs Khan essential medication to treat the infection as she lay "screaming with pain" in intensive care.

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust, which runs the hospital, said it had implemented "far-reaching changes" to way it treats pregnant women following Mrs Khan's death.

"I believe my wife and her family, if the NHS trust takes steps to improve their services, I would be happy. She cannot come back but at least some other lives can be saved."

She feared she was losing her baby, but the emergency department doctor who saw her on November 24 was not trained to carry out scans and advised her to return the next day.

Mrs Khan returned to casualty two days later with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding and was told she had her suffered a septic miscarriage, in which the foetus becomes infected.

Medics in the hospital's intensive care unit prescribed the drug misoprostol to induce labour but despite Mrs Khan agreeing to the treatment at 5pm, she did not receive it until 2am the next day, by which time she was critically ill.

Her husband remained in the dark about the delay for nearly two years following her death.

Her husband said: "I thought they were doing everything but found out at the inquest they were busy and there was a communication gap and they just left my wife lying there screaming with pain, waiting for someone to come and help her."

Mrs Khan underwent a hysterotomy - an operation similar to a Caesarean section - later that morning but began bleeding heavily.

Surgeons then carried out a hysterectomy - the removal of her womb - in a bid to save her life, but she died at 7.10pm on November 27.

An inquest into her death at Croydon Coroner's Court on September 8 heard Mrs Khan did not receive misoprostol for nine hours because of a lack of communication between A&E doctors and those in intensive care.

Source: yourlocalguardian

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Essex Mum Urges Parents To Challenge Doctors After Son's Death
Essex Mum Urges Parents To Challenge Doctors After Son's Death
Published 13th Oct 2015
A mum from Halstead has told parents they should challenge doctors if they think something is wrong after her son's brain cancer was missed.
Four year-old Mackenzie Cacket died from brain and spinal cancer in May 2012.

His parents, Danielle and James Cacket, have argued ever since that doctors should have spotted the tumour on his brain more quickly.

Danielle said Mackenzie had first started to complain of headaches and sickness in August 2010: "Over Christmas that year was just awful, he didn't have the energy to even open his presents and we couldn't get in touch with any doctors because everywhere was shut.

"It was just a nightmare, we were really worried it was something serious but we kept getting shrugged off by the doctors.

The couple said they were repeatedly told there was nothing to worry about for six months until an MRI scan revealed the devastating truth.

The youngster underwent surgery and specialist therapy to remove a "tangerine-sized'' tumour and a scan of his brain shortly afterwards showed that it had gone.

Had doctors also scanned his neck as well then, or a few weeks later when he began to feel unwell again, the family believe they may have noticed a second tumour on his spine.

By the time it was discovered, several months later, it was too late to do anything for him.
Mrs Cackett said: "The hospitals did say sorry, but it's always seemed a bit feeble and that's why we decided to take legal action.

"Nothing is going to bring Mackenzie back, but it's important to us that lessons are learned so nothing like this can happen to anyone else.''
 
Source: heart
 
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Rothwell man whose mum died after operation to take legal action over surgeon
Rothwell man whose mum died after operation to take legal action over surgeon
Published 13th Oct 2015

The son of a Rothwell woman who died in hospital more than a decade ago is to take legal action after it emerged that her surgeon is being investigated over concerns surrounding his treatment.

Andrew Lovell’s mum Anne, a former midwife at Kettering General Hospital, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in August 2003 when she was referred to Professor David Berry at Leicester Royal Infirmary.

She was advised to have surgery and to have part of her pancreas removed.

But she died in October that year after 10 hours in theatre from multiple organ failure and blood poisoning.

It was only this year, after being contacted by the hospital, that her son Andrew found out an independent investigation into Professor Berry’s work had discovered his 66-year-old mother had had her whole pancreas removed.

And he has spoken of his shock after learning that her death could have been prevented.

He said: “I am absolutely devastated and shocked that something like this can even happen.

“It was tough enough losing her in 2003 but this has brought it all back.

“It’s all come out of the blue and to find out that the surgeon took the easy route is disgusting.

“There was a high chance of recovery following the operation and he should have asked for consent before removing the whole pancreas, which he didn’t.

“My mum was midwife for 25 years and there is absolutely no way she would have let him do that given the choice.

“Partially removing the pancreas is more difficult than fully removing it.”

Berry, a liver surgeon, was suspended in January 2013 after an investigation into 10 deaths under his care found that eight were avoidable.

Source: northamptonshiretelegraph

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Footballer to sue medic over baby’s  death
Footballer to sue medic over baby’s death
Published 12th Oct 2015
Hull City footballer Jake Livermore and his girlfriend are suing a medic at a leading private hospital over the “devastating” death of their newborn son shortly after his birth.
 
Mr Livermore and Danielle Del-Giudice say their son Jake Junior died after a ‘catalogue of errors’ at London’s Portland Hospital which led to him suffering injuries including a brain haemorrhage and skull fractures.
 
The couple, who lost their baby in May 2014, said their pleas that Miss Del-Giudice be given a caesarean early were ignored. Obstetrician Eleni Mavrides also allegedly failed to review the baby for 35 minutes, despite concerns about his heart.
 
He and Miss Del-Giudice, 30, claim staff at the Portland Hospital insisted Jake Junior was not born alive – even though the couple are adamant they heard him cry.
 
The parents refused to believe he was stillborn and pushed for an inquest. A coroner subsequently ruled the boy was born alive ‘in very poor condition’ and pronounced dead around half an hour later.
 
Miss Del-Giudice was admitted to hospital on May 18, 2014, and advised by Miss Mavrides that she should have a normal delivery and only have a C-section if there were any complications during her labour.
 
It is alleged that her labour was managed appropriately until 10.30pm when the baby’s heart beat became irregular, and that a review 40 minutes later failed to consider blood sampling to decide if it was safe to continue as planned or whether it would be more appropriate to deliver by C-section.
Despite the baby’s irregular heartbeat a decision was made to continue but after two failed attempts to deliver the baby using forceps the C-section was carried out.
 
Baby Jake Junior was born minutes later at 1am but was in a poor condition and unresponsive. He died 39 minutes later after several resuscitation attempts.
 
An inquest later concluded that had Jake Junior been delivered earlier at or before 11.30pm by emergency caesarean the tragedy would have been avoided.
 
Source: yorkshirepost
 
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NHS apologises to patient wrongly diagnosed with breast cancer
NHS apologises to patient wrongly diagnosed with breast cancer
Published 12th Oct 2015

NHS chiefs have been forced to apologise to a nurse after doctors mixed-up her medical notes with another patient and wrongly diagnosed her with breast cancer.

Elizabeth Dawes, 39, underwent extensive surgery after she had a right breast biopsy which revealed she had Grade 3 invasive cancer that needed immediate treatment.

Doctors advised Mrs Dawes to have a double mastectomy which she refused but she had surgery to remove the tumour and lymph nodes from her armpit.

But four days after the operation, Mrs Dawes' consultant admitted there had been a mix-up between three patients' notes containing biopsy results and her own test had come back negative.

Mrs Dawes was left with extensive scarring and reduced sensation in her breasts and was left so traumatised she left her job as a breast care nurse at the hospital.

Mrs Dawes, from Stafford, who now works at a nursing home, said: "I am absolutely appalled at what I have been through and am still struggling to comprehend how this could even happen.

"To be told you are facing aggressive cancer in your 30s is devastating and of course, I feared the worst and began making plans for my child and getting finances in order.

"I was willing to undergo whatever treatment it took to fight the cancer so when I was told I needed surgery, I didn't think twice.

"The doctor also told me I would need a bilateral breast lift to cosmetically improve the shape of my breasts, as otherwise, after having the cancer surgery I would be left deformed.

"I was very sore after the operation and shocked by the extensive scaring, so to be recalled four days later to be told none of it was necessary was truly horrendous.

"I am still in pain now, have lost a lot of sensation in my breasts and the scarring has not improved which hugely affects my self-confidence.

"Nothing can make up for what has happened but I am determined to see justice done and feel I at least deserve an official apology from the Trust given the huge impact this has had on my life."

Source: telegraph

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24-year-old dies from kidney failure after doctors neglect to treat her properly
24-year-old dies from kidney failure after doctors neglect to treat her properly
Published 12th Oct 2015

A young woman died after a catalogue of medical errors meant doctors failed to investigate her kidney failure - while one even blamed her symptoms on an eating disorder.

Danielle Stretton was just 24 when she was found dead in her flat on Boxing Day last year.

Her mother Mrs Braddock, 58, said: 'On Christmas Day we took her home and said we'd see her again on Boxing Day hoping she'd be feeling better.

Danielle Stretton died from kidney failure at just 24, after doctors failed to treat the problem when it was discovered in 2009.7

Miss Stretton's kidney failure was discovered in 2009 when she suffered a miscarriage, but doctors failed to investigate it any further

'The events that followed were unthinkable - the next day she wasn't answering her phone so we went to the flat and had to break down the door.

'Danielle was just lying on the floor by her bed.

Dr Keith Girling, Deputy Medical Director at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, said: 'We extend our condolences to Danielle’s family.

'Our investigation into the care provided to Danielle when she was treated as an emergency patient in 2009 found that important test results weren’t followed up when they should have been, leading to a delayed diagnosis of renal failure.

'We shared the findings of our investigation in full with Danielle’s mother and have completed a financial settlement with the family.

Source: dailymail

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Halesowen cyclist Emily Holland may never ride again after horror car smash
Halesowen cyclist Emily Holland may never ride again after horror car smash
Published 8th Oct 2015

A racing cyclist’s dreams of becoming a world champion were shattered when a hit and run driver left the Halesowen woman with a badly broken leg.

Four months later, Emily Holland who is still not back at work and undergoing physiotherapy, fears she may never ride again.

Jamie Irshad whose van smashed into the 21-year-old cyclist at an island on Woodgate Lane, Bartley Green, was banned from driving for a year by Birmingham magistrates last Friday.

He pleaded guilty to driving without due care and attention and failing to stop after the accident on June 23.

Miss Holland said two witnesses had chased after him in their cars and passed his registration number to police.

The 23-year-old driver, of Swinford Road, Selly Oak, was also sentenced to 12 weeks in prison suspended for 12 months, ordered to pay £873 to Miss Holland, £150 criminal court charge, £80 victim surcharge and £80 costs.

But Miss Holland, of Grange Crescent, who was flung 7ft into the air when she was hit by the front of the van, will live with the physical and mental scars for the rest of her life.

Her shattered left shin bone was repaired with the aid of two permanent titanium pins and she is still in pain.

Four years of intensive cycle training were destroyed in seconds, her racing season “trashed”, and her £5,000 custom-built bike wrecked.

Even if she can overcome the mental impact of the accident, she reckons it will put her racing career back two years, but at present she cannot face riding a bike – not even an exercise bike.

She has panic attacks even as a passenger in a car and struggles to make herself cross roads while walking her dog.

“Cycling was my life, it was my reason for getting up and I was training six days a week,” said Miss Holland, adding: “I feel that risking my health and life again is not worth it – it has put me into a bit of a corner of depression.”

Source: Kidderminster Shuttle

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Footballer left in pain for three years following hospital blunders
Footballer left in pain for three years following hospital blunders
Published 8th Oct 2015

A Worcester footballer has spoken about how she was left in pain for three years after a fracture she suffered while playing was not properly treated.

Sally Marsh of Diglis was playing with KGV Women’s team in August 2012 when she landed awkwardly, fracturing two bones in her right leg. But a series of errors by staff at Worcestershire Royal Hospital left the leg deformed and nerves damaged.

When Miss Marsh was taken to the Royal her leg was put into a cast and was told she would be able to put weight on it. The cast remained on for eight weeks before she was given a half leg cast for a further six weeks and then an airboot leg brace.

When the cast was removed Miss Marsh – who had continued to experience serious pain while it was on – noticed her leg looked bent and went to see an orthopaedic specialist at the Royal, who told her the bones had not healed properly and had set at a painful 19 degree angle. Although she was told she would need an operation to realign the bones within a few weeks, the procedure was not carried out until November 2013 – nine months later.

A metal cage was fitted to her leg to help it heal, but developed a number of infections. Although it was removed in March 2014 Miss Marsh continued to experience pain and still has to wear the airboot. In August this year she was referred for more surgery to fix screws and bolts in her leg to stabilise the fractures.

The 25-year-old said the past three years had been “incredibly difficult” and she had been unable to play football since the accident.

“I am still in a great amount of pain on a daily basis, which affects my mobility and has also forced me to have a significant amount of time off work,” she said.

She added she was particularly annoyed she was being forced to have further surgery, which could delay her recovery yet further.

“I am desperate to get my life back to normal,” she said.

“I should have been given the correct treatment to start with which would have avoided the past three years’ worth of hospital visits, surgeries and ongoing pain and I would have made a full recovery.”

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust – which runs the Royal as well as Kidderminster Hospital and Redditch’s Alexandra Hospital – has since admitted Miss Marsh should not have been told she could put weight on her leg after being discharged the first time.

The organisation has also conceded it failed to recognise she needed surgery to fix the fracture and her recovery had been delayed as a result.

Source: Kidderminster Shuttle

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Sevenoaks family awarded compensation after seven-year-old suffers brain damage
Sevenoaks family awarded compensation after seven-year-old suffers brain damage
Published 8th Oct 2015

A Sevenoaks couple have been awarded compensation from a hospital trust after their son was left severely brain damaged. 

Christian Corion has severe whole body dykentic cerebral palsy, significant learning difficulties and visual impairment. The seven-year-old also has limited mobility and is fed through a tube.

After being born in 2007 he was discharged from Lewisham Hospital fit and well, but developed jaundice. 

His parents, Chris and Kay, took him back to hospital when he was five days old but there was substandard care in his treatment for jaundice, including a delay in giving him phototherapy and transfusions. 

As a result, Christian suffered severe brain damage. 

A spokesman for the Lewisham and Greenwhich NHS Trust said: "We have apologised to Christian Corion and his family for the shortcomings in his care at Lewisham Hospital in 2007. 

"We are deeply saddened by this case and following a full investigation we took a number of steps, including introducing new equipment in A&E and community midwifery services to detect and treat jaundice in babies, to do all we can to prevent tragedies such as this happening again.”

Source: kentonline

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A Preston family have won their 14-year battle to secure life changing compensation for their severely disabled son.
A Preston family have won their 14-year battle to secure life changing compensation for their severely disabled son.
Published 8th Oct 2015

A High Court judge approved the terms of a settlement worth £3.9million, which will now be paid to Amos Mason as a £2.1million lump followed by annual periodical payments of £100,000 for the rest of his life.

Mum Ruth said: “We’re extremely relieved and very thankful. It’s been a really long, hard battle, but it’s been worth it.”

Amos, now 25, of Ingol, Preston, was born with a serious thyroid condition which went undiagnosed and untreated for much of his childhood. This was despite repeated visits to local medics.

A top judge praised the courage and resilience of the couple as she approved the payout, which means the family can proceed with the purchase of a property ideally located for Amos, which will require minimal adaptation to suit his specialist medical needs. The annual payments will also provide additional security for Amos’s future as they will allow them to obtain help with caring for him and buying specialist equipment for the rest of his life.

Ruth added: “We have a great team of people around us and they’ve kept us going through all of this. Hopefully now we can have a more normal life.

“At first it seemed like a dream, like it was never going to happen, but then when we knew it was coming it seemed to take forever.

“It’s taken a lot of hardwork, but it’s all been for Amos, and he’s a happy boy.”

Source: lep

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Gross negligence by hospital staff caused six-year-old's death
Gross negligence by hospital staff caused six-year-old's death
Published 7th Oct 2015
A six-year-old boy died because of neglect by hospital staff who failed to realise he was seriously ill, a court has heard.
 
Jack Adcock died in Leicester Royal Infirmary after a series of failings, including a doctor mistakenly believing he was under a “do not resuscitate” order.
 
Medical staff were stopped from giving life-saving treatment to the youngster by Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba before the error was picked up by a junior doctor.
 
Nottingham crown court heard that Bawa-Garba had confused Jack for another patient she had treated earlier in the day, in what prosecutor Andrew Thomas QC called a “remarkable error”.
 
He added that while Jack, of Glen Parva, Leicester, was “beyond the point of no return” and that resuscitation was futile, it suggests Bawa-Garba had not given the youngster “sufficient care”.
 
When Jack was admitted staff did not monitor Jack’s condition effectively, and failed to recognise high levels of blood gas and lactate as concerning.
 
Jack collapsed at 7.45pm, with prosecutors saying his lips had started to turn blue, and a paediatric arrest team was summoned.
 
“During this critical period an event occurred which you may think is powerful evidence of Dr Bawa-Garba’s performance that day.
 
“When she came into the bay, almost immediately she called the resuscitation off.
 
“She told the other doctors Jack had been marked down as do not resuscitate earlier in the day.”
 
A first-year doctor then re-read the notes and said she could not see a DNR entry.
 
“It was a remarkable error for a doctor to make. Dr Bawa-Garba was later to explain she had mixed Jack up with another child she had been treating on the children’s assessment unit.”
 
“There was of course an underlying natural illness – the lung infection – which had led to sepsis and septic shock. But the lack of care contributed to Jack’s death. It was a needless death.”
 
Source:  theguardian
 
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I saw a blast, then agony: Woman describes pain as pacemaker explodes in her chest
I saw a blast, then agony: Woman describes pain as pacemaker explodes in her chest
Published 7th Oct 2015
A former dance instructor has told how she was rushed to hospital after a heart implant "exploded" in her chest.
 
Ms McAndrew, a mother of two and former fitness and dance instructor, had an electrical heart implant in April 2006 after suffering serious heart and breathing problems for the previous months.
 
Tests showed she had been born with an irregular heartbeat and her surgeon told her the heart was like a "time bomb waiting to go off."
 
After the fitting Ms McAndrew became strong again and continued to teach fitness until one night in February 2009 as she "reached to put out the light in my bedroom" she felt "a great big bang".
 
"I saw a blast. I thought it was an electric shock from the light. I slumped on the stairs and felt an awful pain in my chest," she recalled.
 
Her partner drove her to hospital where Ms McAndrew was admitted to the critical care unit. Doctors discovered that the lead to her device had suddenly fractured and Ms McAndrew had to undergo another operation to have a second device fitted.
 
However since then Ms McAndrew says she has never felt well again. She believes the incident damaged her heart and she is taking legal action against the manufacturers of the device for her suffering.
 
"I can only potter about now. I cannot walk far as I get so breathless and tired. I cannot even get to the top of the stairs without struggling and getting out of breath," she said.
 
She is now registered disabled and believes she has "lost years" of her life since the device failed.
 
Source: express
 
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Mum demands hospital apology for ‘negligent’ treatment in son’s death
Mum demands hospital apology for ‘negligent’ treatment in son’s death
Published 7th Oct 2015
The parents of a disabled man who died in Barnsley Hospital more than two years ago have demanded an apology after their medical negligence claim was settled out of court.
 
Glen Bonson was aged 26 when he died in January 2013, after medics failed to recognise the life-saving ‘shunt’ he was fitted with as a child was not working properly and causing him to be severely ill.
 
The shunt – a small hole or passage – had been installed to help Glen’s cerebral palsy and hydrocephalus, a condition where there is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the brain.
 
However, doctors failed to give Glen a CT scan days before his death, a procedure which could have shown his shunt was blocked.
 
“Given his history, altered state of consciousness and the lack of evidence of an infection, they should have prioritised investigations to rule out a shunt blockage and they failed to perform a CT scan as scheduled.
 
A hospital spokesman said: “We offer our sincere condolences to the family and loved ones of Mr Bonson.
 
“We apologise for the distress and upset that the events surrounding Mr Bonson’s death have caused.”
 
Source: thestar
 
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Mothers of two teenage girls killed in a car crash say £13,000 payout for a dead child is a 'pathetic' insult
Mothers of two teenage girls killed in a car crash say £13,000 payout for a dead child is a 'pathetic' insult
Published 6th Oct 2015
The mothers of two teenage girls killed in a car crash in Conisbrough, South Yorkshire, have described the £13,000 bereavement compensation provided for a dead child as 'pathetic', and launched an e-petition to change the law governing bereavement damages.
 
Megan Storey and Jordanna Goodwin, both 16, died alongside Blake Cairns, 16, Arpad Kore, 18, and Bartosz Bortniczak, 18, in a two-car accident last year during a Saturday night trip to McDonalds.
 
The group of friends from Doncaster were killed when the blue Toyota Corolla they were travelling in  ‘lost control’ heading downhill on a bend and collided with a grey Seat Leon coming in the opposite direction. 
 
They were driving along a 60mph stretch of the A630 Doncaster to Rotherham road – known as an accident black spot – when the Toyota slid sideways into the opposite carriageway and was hit by the Seat Leon, causing extensive damage.
 
After the crash police arrested a 21-year-old man who was driving a third vehicle, a black Vauxhall Corsa, in front of the two other vehicles when they crashed. No charges were brought against the driver of the third vehicle. 
 
Tracey Storey, Megan's mother, and Vicki McCarthy, Jordanna's mother, received bereavement damages of £12,980 following the accident.
 
Source: Daily Mail
 
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Communication problem with foreign doctor leads to Hull Royal Infirmary operation mix-up
Communication problem with foreign doctor leads to Hull Royal Infirmary operation mix-up
Published 6th Oct 2015

A man was forced to undergo surgery twice after a foreign doctor operated on the wrong part of his body.

Peter Ross, 68, had surgery on his spine twice because there had been communication problems between the surgeon in charge and the foreign locum doctor.

Mr Ross, a retired taxi company owner, said he had learned the foreign doctor working as a locum at Hull Royal Infirmary had also failed to check an X-ray properly before carrying out the operation.

Now, Mr Ross is taking legal action against Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust.

"This should never have happened to me. You go into hospital expecting them to know what they are doing and to at least be able to communicate properly. That was what shocked me."

Mr Ross woke up with 75 per cent paralysis caused by an agonising back condition known as discitis, an inflammation of the discs, in December and was rushed to Hull Royal Infirmary from his caravan in Sand-le-Mere near Withernsea.

He was told he needed surgery known as spinal decompression between two vertebrae to relieve the pressure.

A surgeon marked the correct position for his surgery before he was taken to the operating theatre.

As he came round from the anaesthetic, Mr Ross remembers the same surgeon apologising because a second operation was necessary.

After the second operation, Mr Ross was transferred to Pinderfields Hospital in Wakefield, where he spent six weeks recuperating.

He still has to use two sticks to get about and is trying to establish if he has suffered lasting damage.

Source: hulldailymail

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Tragic baby death 'could have been prevented'
Tragic baby death 'could have been prevented'
Published 6th Oct 2015
Epsom-based family was "devastated beyond words" after little Micah Smith died just a month after he was born. He could have been saved if medical staff spotted and treated his brain haemorrhage.
 
Micah Smith was born on June 13, 2013, at East Surrey Hospital in Redhill by emergency caesarean - along with his brother - before being discharged a few days later.
 
Upon having problems feeding, a midwife recommended a tongue tie separation procedure, which was carried out on June 25 heard a two-day inquest at Surrey Coroner's Court in Woking.
 
Micah became increasingly unwell and spent weeks in and out of Epsom General Hospital where he was treated for reflux and infection, despite symptoms pointing towards a neurological cause.
 
On July 13, Micah collapsed and required resuscitation whereby it became clear he was suffering a brain haemorrhage and hydrocephalus - fluid on the brain.
 
He was transferred to St George's Hospital in Tooting where scans showed he had suffered irreversible brain damage.
 
Intensive care was withdrawn and Micah died on July 15.
 
Source: getsurrey
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Patient of suspended surgeon Manu Nair was left infertile after treatment
Patient of suspended surgeon Manu Nair was left infertile after treatment
Published 5th Oct 2015
A Birmingham hospital patient has claimed he was left infertile after receiving treatment from prostrate cancer surgeon Manu Nair.
 
Around 170 patients have been recalled by the Heart of England NHS Trust after concerns were raised about the medic, who has appeared on TV’s Embarrassing Bodies.
 
The surgeon was suspended last year and has now resigned.
 
Now a former patient has spoken out after he was given a new laser treatment advised by Mr Nair
in 2012 - which was not then approved by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence.
 
The man, who does not want to be named, claims he was later left in excruciating pain and is now infertile and unable to start a family with his wife of 23 years.
 
“My whole way of life has changed. Being told that I can no longer have children is just soul-destroying,” he said.
 
Another patient who was diagnosed with cancer, also alleges he underwent surgery to remove his prostate by Dr Manu Nair in 2009.
 
The 63-year-old was later be told by an independent medical expert that his prostate gland was pre-malignant, that he did not have cancer, and that he did not need the operation.
 
Earlier this week the Heart of England NHS Trust and Spire apologised to patients for any distress or uncertainty caused.
 
Source: birminghammail
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Family 'to launch civil action' after inquest into Down's syndrome sufferer's death in Gloucester
Family 'to launch civil action' after inquest into Down's syndrome sufferer's death in Gloucester
Published 5th Oct 2015

A family are to launch a civil lawsuit against Gloucestershire Royal Hospital because they claim a Down's syndrome sufferer's death there was preceded by neglect in his care.

Austin, 63, died on June 29, 2012, after being admitted to the hospital with a chest infection.

It took three years for an inquest into his death to take place, with the hearing in Barnwood finding Austin died of bronchopneumonia.

But Austin's sister Christine Hopkin remains upset by the treatment she claims her brother received and said she will take civil action against Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Gloucestershire Coroner's Court was told Austin was discharged back to his care home after being sent to the hospital on June 7, 2012, only to be re-admitted later the same day after his condition worsened.

Austin, who was diagnosed with dementia and epilepsy earlier that year, was also taken to Gloucestershire Royal Hospital in May 2012 with a similar chest infection.

"We offer our sincere condolences to the family of Mr Smith and remain fully committed to understanding and supporting the needs of patients with learning disabilities."

Source: gloucestercitizen

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter. 

Family accuse Devon hospital of 'negligence' after death of Navy veteran who died from head injury
Family accuse Devon hospital of 'negligence' after death of Navy veteran who died from head injury
Published 5th Oct 2015

The family of a retired Royal Navy officer who died after wandering out of a hospital ward and hitting his head, have accused a Devon hospital of "negligence".

Geoffrey Billinghurst was admitted to Plymouth's Derriford Hospital in January with what medical experts believed was a suspected urine infection.

The 78-year-old went missing, and was found on the floor outside by security guards with a severe head injury.

Trust bosses have admitted failures in Mr Billinghurst's care, apologised to his family and insisted lessons have been learned.

"This is a very, very sad case and we would like to reiterate our deepest sympathy and apologies to Mr Billinghurst's family."

Source: northdevonjournal

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Coventry bus crash: Two dead after double-decker hits supermarket
Coventry bus crash: Two dead after double-decker hits supermarket
Published 5th Oct 2015
An eight-year-old boy and a woman thought to be in her 70s have died after a double-decker bus crashed into a supermarket in Coventry city centre, West Midlands Police have said.
 
The boy, a passenger on the top deck of the bus, and the woman, a pedestrian, both died at the scene.
 
A nine-year-old girl is also seriously ill in hospital, while six others, including the bus driver, were hurt.
 
The bus collided with stationary cars before hitting the Sainsbury's store.
 
A number of people were trapped on the bus's top deck, police added.
 
Specialist officers are supporting the families of the boy, from Leamington, and the woman, from Nuneaton.
 
Source: BBC
 
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Hospital negligence case wins payout for grieving family
Hospital negligence case wins payout for grieving family
Published 1st Oct 2015

A grieving son received a clinical negligence settlement from Luton & Dunstable Hospital after accusations they failed to care for his 92-year-old mother.


Barry Holland, 65, took legal action against the hospital after his mum was permanently paralysed during her stay there. 


Barry said: “The way my mother was treated was terrible and it should never have happened.


“She didn’t deserve to be treated like that and I hope it never happens to anyone else.”


Barry’s mum, Joan Holland, had spent six weeks in hospital after being admitted in October 2011 with an infection.


Within just two days, Joan suffered a catastrophic spinal injury after falling from a commode, leaving her permanently paralysed.


She then endured five days of agony as nurses attempted to get her to walk, before the spinal injury was detected by an MRI scan.


Mrs Holland was later moved to a care home on December 12, 2011, where she developed horrific bedsores and a fractured upper arm after falling from her bed. She later moved to another care home, 

where she died on April 21 2012.


Source: leightonbuzzardonline

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Girl born with brain damage at Heatherwood Hospital awarded £9.6m compensation
Girl born with brain damage at Heatherwood Hospital awarded £9.6m compensation
Published 1st Oct 2015
The girl, now 13-years old, was awarded a £9.6m compensation package by London’s High Court.

The 13-year-old, who cannot be named, suffers from acute cerebral palsy.

“It is plain to see just how devoted her parents have been to do all they can for their much-loved daughter,”

The incident was caused through negligence by medics in delaying an emergency caesarean section at the Ascot hospital.

“We hope the agreed compensation will make her life easier.”

The settlement includes a £2.5 million lump sum, plus index-linked and tax-free annual payments to cover the costs of her care for life.

Source: getreading
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter. 
Mother of three left incontinent for two years after botched operation by surgeon is awarded compensation
Mother of three left incontinent for two years after botched operation by surgeon is awarded compensation
Published 1st Oct 2015
A woman who was left in agony for years after a botched operation has been awarded more than £50,000 in compensation.

Mrs Hill, of Tywardreath, Cornwall, was left in agony after a mistake by Mr Jones, a former consultant in gynaecology at the Royal Cornwall Hospital, during a hysterectomy.

The operation caused a hole near her bladder which was not diagnosed by Mr Jones and was only discovered when she saw another doctor five months later.

She had to undergo two rounds of surgery and only regained control of her bladder two years after the initial botched operation. 

The mother of three did not disclose the full amount of her award from the local hospital trust but said it was between £50,000 and £100,000.

She said: ‘After months of being told that nothing was wrong with me and then having to endure two operations and have lots of other help to put right what went wrong, I feel a bit numb by it all.

‘Being incontinent was the hardest thing for me. I just felt disgusting. 

'I felt so unattractive and worthless. I was only 34 and had three young children.

Source: dailymail
 
C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter. 
Mother-of-two awarded £925,000 compensation after NHS blunder left her with life-changing condition
Mother-of-two awarded £925,000 compensation after NHS blunder left her with life-changing condition
Published 29th Sep 2015

A mother-of-two has been awarded £925,000 compensation after an NHS blunder which left her with a devastating and life-changing condition.

Claire Thornber now lives with constant pain because a prolapsed disc which was pressing on nerves at the base of her spine was not treated fast enough.

The 42-year-old said the pay-out would help her and her children but said no amount would compensate for the trauma and the lasting condition, known as cauda equina syndrome.

She said: “The impact of the errors has been huge and I was just being dismissed with back pain but it was more serious.

“I lost everything to cauda equina syndrome but the tragedy is that if there had been greater awareness of the need for urgency things would have been so different.”

Because of the negligence, Claire lost her established cleaning business Scrubbers & Co and has permanent pain in her legs which makes walking difficult.

“The money is for the future, for my children and to highlight cauda equina syndrome.”

Source: lancashiretelegraph

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£10,000 - payout awarded after Hospital doctors misdiagnosed patient's cancer
£10,000 - payout awarded after Hospital doctors misdiagnosed patient's cancer
Published 29th Sep 2015

A women has won a £10,000 pay out from the NHS following claims her husband was misdiagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome when he had cancer.

Robert Whitfield had been suffering pain for more than a year before he was diagnosed with bowel cancer in 2008, despite tests being carried out the previous year which could have diagnosed his tumour.

Mr Whitfield died at his home in Wolsingham, County Durham, in March 2010.

He first fell ill while on holiday in Scotland in 2006 and was diagnosed at Darlington Memorial Hospital with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but he continued to experience pain and his family became increasingly worried about his health.

His wife Margaret Whitfield, who now lives in Crook, said: “He couldn’t get up or eat anything. I was really worried about it because he was a strong man. I’ve never known a pain to knock him out before.

“We went to hospital on June 13, 2008 and they told us he was three days off dying.

"The doctor said he had a tumour the size of a grapefruit in his bowel and it had spread to his liver. I just got up and walked out. I felt like screaming.”

The couple started legal action in 2008, when a report of his medical care was produced which found a colonic tumour had been missed when tests were carried out in September 2007.

Mrs Whitfield added: “I’ve had to wait and wait for seven years and I still feel as though I’ve let him down because I didn’t get to go to court. I wanted them to stand up and say what has been done and for someone to be accountable.”

Source: thenorthernecho

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£1.5 million awarded for child left severely disabled after birth
£1.5 million awarded for child left severely disabled after birth
Published 21st Sep 2015

A child left disabled for life after suffering brain damage at birth in Tunbridge Wells Hospital has been awarded a £1.5million damages pay-out.

The six-year-old boy, who cannot be identified, was left quadriplegic, with cerebral palsy and was plagued by terrible seizures for the early years of his life after being born at the Pembury hospital in 2009.

His parents sued the Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust for damages, alleging clinical negligence.

Although the Trust denied liability for his injuries, it agreed to a £1.5m settlement of the claim.

"He is in a very suitable school and is living a lovely life. We very much hope the settlement sum will secure the very best possible future for him."

Source: courier

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Hospital fined £100k over death of disabled girl who fell from hospital bed and suffocated on plastic sheeting
Hospital fined £100k over death of disabled girl who fell from hospital bed and suffocated on plastic sheeting
Published 21st Sep 2015

A hospital has been fined £110,000 after a severely disabled girl fell from a faulty hospital bed and suffocated on plastic sheeting despite repeated warnings from her parents that the bed was broken.

Jade Norton, 10, who suffered from the rare disorder Rett syndrome and could not walk or talk, suffered a suspected epileptic seizure at her home in June 2011.

Her father found her on her bedroom floor on June 5 in an unresponsive state after becoming trapped between the mattress and the vinyl sheeting when a faulty side rail gave way.

Her parents, support worker Amanda, 42, and self-employed Lee, 41, from Blackpool, Lancashire, had reported the bed broken on five separate occasions in the three months prior to her death.

However no remedial action was ever taken and risk assessments of the bed were not carried out despite Jade being found in a similar position twice before and seizures getting increasingly worse.

The family have now been awarded compensation.

Source: Daily Mail

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Optician is first in Britain to be charged with negligent manslaughter after death of boy, eight
Optician is first in Britain to be charged with negligent manslaughter after death of boy, eight
Published 14th Sep 2015

A high street optician is facing trial accused of manslaughter by gross negligence after a young patient died following a routine check-up.

Honey Rose, 34, was charged with the offence after eight-year-old Vincent Barker suffered a fatal build-up of fluid on the brain.

She should have spotted he had papilledema, a swelling of the optic nerve due to increased pressure in the skull which can be picked up by the internal examination of the eye that is a feature of every sight test.

Shortly after his death, the Reverend Andrew Dotchin, then rector of Whitton with Thurleston and Akenham, said: ‘There have been lots of tears shed, immense sadness and great shock.

‘This has reverberated throughout the community. Everyone has been touched by how terribly tragic it is.

‘Parents have been hugging their children close and sending their thoughts and prayers to Vincent’s family at this awful time.’

Source: Daily Mail

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Woman knocked down by drunk driver handed £10,000 in compensation after being left for dead
Woman knocked down by drunk driver handed £10,000 in compensation after being left for dead
Published 14th Sep 2015

A woman knocked down by a drunk driver who left her for dead has been handed £10,000 in compensation.

Necole Stewart and her friend Ailsa Howden were knocked down by Neil Wylie after the motorist had been drink driving.

Delivery driver Wylie, 52, was so drunk that he carried on driving, leaving the two friends for dead in the street.

He was sent to prison for 22 months and banned from driving for four years.

Necole has now been awarded £10,000 for the injuries sustained in the crash.

Necole said at the time: “I’m just so grateful Ailsa and I are OK and thankful to everyone who helped us.”

Source: Mirror

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims, and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Preston Sharoe Green Hospital negligence siblings awarded £13m
Preston Sharoe Green Hospital negligence siblings awarded £13m
Published 11th Sep 2015

Two siblings left brain damaged from birth have been awarded multimillion-pound payouts in "unprecedented" clinical negligence cases.

Natasha Jackson, now 23, has been awarded £7m after errors at Sharoe Green Hospital, Preston, resulted in her developing cerebral palsy.

It follows a £6m payout for her brother Patrick, 22, who also has the condition, awarded in 2010.

Both Natasha and Patrick were left severely disabled after errors during their deliveries at the hospital, which closed in 2004.

Their mother, Paula McKay, fought lengthy legal battles to secure compensation for her children, who both require specialised accommodation and equipment.

Ms McKay said the settlements had reassured her both children would be taken care of after she died.

The NHS Litigation Authority said: "Compensation has been agreed with the family, which will assist in meeting the claimant's current and future care needs for life."

Source: bbc.co.uk

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Recycling firm admit safety failing after death of father of six
Recycling firm admit safety failing after death of father of six
Published 11th Sep 2015

A waste recycling firm has admitted safety failings related to a worker being killed at its premises in Batley.

Simon Brook, an employee of Gwynn Davies-McTiffin Ltd was found lying seriously injured at the bottom of a horizontal baling machine.

His legs had been partially severed inside the machine and had to be amputated by a doctor at the scene. The 50-year-old father of six died two days later.

The machine was operational at the time, and it is likely that Mr Brook falling into the hopper cleared the blockage, causing the machine to automatically restart.

Health and safety management systems fell far short of what was required with management failing to ensure that long standing actions from risk assessments were implemented or that safe working practices for clearing blockages were put in place.

The widow of Mr Brook, Diane confirmed in her Victim Personal Statement that “The lives of myself and our children have been ruined.

Source: hse.gov.uk

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Mum left with plastic tube in her stomach for a year after gastric surgery leaves her in agony
Mum left with plastic tube in her stomach for a year after gastric surgery leaves her in agony
Published 9th Sep 2015

A Midland mum was left in agony for more than a year after a two and a half inch tube of plastic was left in her body after gastric surgery.

Helen Reynolds, from Rugeley, was admitted to Manchester Spire Hospital for gastric bypass surgery in January 2014 following unsuccessful gastric band surgery the previous year.

Two months after the operation the 50-year-old started to suffer from excruciating pain in her abdomen, which left her practically house bound.

After months of debilitating pain Helen was left shocked after scans at Spire Hospital in Little Aston revealed that a foreign object had been left inside her.

“I am flabbergasted at how this has happened to me.”

“I suffered for months and months with excruciating pain in my stomach, which I can only describe as like labour pains.’’ said Helen.

Surgeon Professor Basil Ammori, at Manchester Spire Hospital, has since admitted his mistake and apologised for leaving the foreign body inside.

Source: birminghammail

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Mother whose son suffered brain damage wins £5.25m in landmark court battle
Mother whose son suffered brain damage wins £5.25m in landmark court battle
Published 9th Sep 2015

Below is a claim which has changed the way in which clinical negligence claims are assessed:

A mother whose son suffered brain damage during birth has been awarded damages of £5.25 million in a landmark ruling that is set to change doctor-patient relationships throughout the UK.

Nadine Montgomery, 40, said medics failed to give her important advice that would probably have resulted in her choosing to have a caesarean section.

Instead, the diabetes sufferer went ahead with a natural birth without knowing of the risks associated with her condition, and her baby was born with cerebral palsy.

Her damages claim against Lanarkshire Health Board was previously rejected twice by Scottish courts, but has been upheld by seven judges at the Supreme Court in London.

Mrs Montgomery’s son Sam suffered oxygen deprivation during a 12-minute delay in his birth during which his shoulder became stuck - a condition known as shoulder dystocia - after the delivery of his head.

She added: "I believe that I had the right to know of all the risks surrounding Sam's birth, and I am pleased the Supreme Court has recognised that.

Source: telegraph

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
South Derbyshire woman awarded five-figure payout after horrific injuries caused by A38 crash
South Derbyshire woman awarded five-figure payout after horrific injuries caused by A38 crash
Published 9th Sep 2015

A woman left with multiple fractures to her pelvis after a car was shunted onto a grass verge at the side of a dual carriageway, where she was stood helping her daughter, whose car had broken down, has spoken out for the first time as she receives a settlement to help with her recovery.

Anna Harrison, from Egginton, had pulled over just past the slip road to Littleover on the A38 northbound carriageway on 17th December 2012 after receiving a call from her daughter, Jane, who had broken down at the side of the road.

After helping her daughter, the nursing assistant was stood on the verge with her partner when suddenly a van being driven along the carriageway crashed into the back of her car shunting it into them

Anna was taken to Royal Derby Hospital where she had scans and x-rays which confirmed she had fractured her pelvis and needed surgery. She was transferred to Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham in excruciating pain and had an operation a few days later to fix metal bars into her pelvis to help it heal.

Anna has now secured a five-figure settlement to cover her loss of earnings after having five months off work while she was injured and also to help cover the costs of future medical treatment she needs.

Source: burtonmail

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims, and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Peckham crash: Woman dies after being hit by a lorry in south-east London
Peckham crash: Woman dies after being hit by a lorry in south-east London
Published 8th Sep 2015

A woman has died after being hit by a lorry in Peckham.

The 76-year-old pedestrian was struck by the truck on Peckham High Street.

Police, paramedics, and London Air Ambulance attended, but the woman was pronounced dead at the scene.

Those at the scene also said the driver was left visibly shaken by the accident

People took to Twitter to pay their condolences, with many saying the stretch of road is notoriously dangerous.

Source: Standard

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Construction worker injured in crane fall
Construction worker injured in crane fall
Published 8th Sep 2015

A construction worker was injured by boards which fell from a crane.

The man was knocked unconscious and suffered a broken leg and fractured ribs during the incident, which occurred at a Balfour Beatty building site in St Aldhelms Road, Branksome, on May 6 last year.

15 plaster boards, weighing a total of 544 kilograms, were being lifted by crane from the fourth floor of the building under construction to a lift loading bay at the front of the building.

As the load descended into the bay it snagged on scaffolding which caused the boards to fall out of the retaining slings.

The worker was struck by a number of the boards as he stood in the loading bay.

Source: bournemouthecho

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims, and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Photographer awarded £2.4m damages payout from the NHS after hospital negligence wrecked her career
Photographer awarded £2.4m damages payout from the NHS after hospital negligence wrecked her career
Published 8th Sep 2015

A mother-of-three who had a negligent delay in spinal surgery has won £2.4million in damages from the NHS.

Heather Tait was in tears yesterday when the award was announced at London’s High Court.

She was the boss of her own company and winning respect as a professional photographer before she went into Cheltenham General Hospital in July 2009, suffering from severe back pain.
Athough it was suspected she had a prolapsed disc, she was sent home without an MRI scan.

By the next day, Mrs Tait’s condition had deteriorated. She returned to hospital and a scan revealed a massive prolapsed disc. 

She had emergency spinal surgery at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham on July 8, 2009.

If she had had the scan and surgery earlier, she would not have developed the severe injuries she now suffers from.

She has now been paid £2.4million in damages.

Source: Daily Mail

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Cancer patient 'wrongly told she had weeks to live' - 2 years later she's dying after stopping treatment
Cancer patient 'wrongly told she had weeks to live' - 2 years later she's dying after stopping treatment
Published 7th Sep 2015

Margaret Lowbridge, 74, said she was told to plan her funeral before being told she should have continued treatment 18 months on.

Margaret said she was told by a doctor at Russells Hall Hospital in West Midlands her bowel cancer was terminal and to prepare for the end of her life.

But after 18 months she was asked to attend a follow-up meeting where she says she was told by Dudley Group NHS trust the diagnosis was wrong and she should have been offered more treatment.

Now Margaret, of Oldbury, West Midlands, is dying after her cancer spread.

She believes stopping treatment prevented her from having a chance of beating the disease.

Margaret was diagnosed in June 2013 and was told her cancer had not been terminal in December last year.

The doctor was employed by Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals Trust but had left the organisation by the time of the follow-up appointment.

Source: Mirror

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Brain injury leads to compensation for 21-year-old Bognor Regis man
Brain injury leads to compensation for 21-year-old Bognor Regis man
Published 7th Sep 2015

Damages have been awarded to a Bognor Regis man to compensate for the catastrophic brain injuries he suffered in a road accident.

The large lump sum, which has not been disclosed, was awarded to Josh Humphrey in the High Court on Monday.

It was in settlement of his claim for the catastrophic injuries he inclined in the collision five years ago. The damages also include payments for the care he will need for the rest of his life.

Josh’s mother, Steph Humphrey, said after the hearing: “We are grateful this aspect is now over.

“Nothing will take away Josh’s terrible difficulties but at least we no longer have the huge financial worries that arise as a result of brain injury.”Josh was just 16 when he was one of the passengers in a friend’s car on their way out for a day trip.

A collision with a lorry in Wisborough Green led to one passenger dying and Josh suffered what was described by doctors as a very severe traumatic brain injury.

In the months that followed, Josh spent time at various hospitals and rehabilitation units until he was finally fit to return to a specially adapted bungalow.

Source: bognor.co.uk

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims, and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.
Family of pensioner who died after hospital fall take action against Royal Infirmary
Family of pensioner who died after hospital fall take action against Royal Infirmary
Published 7th Sep 2015

Family of pensioner who died after hospital fall take action against Royal Infirmary

The family of a Dalton woman who died after a fall in Huddersfield Royal Infirmary are taking action against the hospital.

It was revealed last week the infirmary had been warned that the death of Jeanne Summers, 78, could have been prevented.

Frail Jeanne, from Dalton, slipped and fell in a hospital toilet cubicle in 2013, badly breaking her ankle.

An official inquiry concluded the fall contributed to her death ten days later.

It said Jeanne could have been avoided if she had been assisted all the way to the toilet and changed into more suitable footwear than the socks she was wearing.

Now Jeanne’s family have come forward to reveal they are making a negligence claim against the trust.

Source: Examiner

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Contaminated blood victim says scandal means he’s unable to pay bills
Contaminated blood victim says scandal means he’s unable to pay bills
Published 7th Sep 2015

A Norwich man made sick because of contaminated blood given to him by the NHS faced bailiff action over an unpaid council tax bill - which he claims he can’t pay because of his illness.

The married dad, who contracted hepatitis C in the 1980s from blood products given to him for mild haemophilia, was summonsed to court after being unable to pay his latest Norwich City Council tax bill.

However, he claims to be unable to meet the costs because his sickness means he can’t regularly work, he is being refused benefits and the government continues to stall on providing proper compensation for him and the thousands of others affected by the scandal.

He is one of thousands nationally, who were infected with hep C or HIV after being given poisoned blood products that were imported in the 1970s and 1980s without proper safety checks.

The victim, whose only support from the state is to receive £291 a month from the Caxton Foundation, set up to help victims but facing accusations of being unfair and poorly run, believes that proper compensation would give him and his family more financial security.

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Hospital pay compensation to widow after sending ill man home
Hospital pay compensation to widow after sending ill man home
Published 7th Sep 2015

Grieving widow Julia Withers has been awarded a 'five figure' compensation deal after hospital bosses admitted misdiagnosing her husband.

The 77-year-old took legal advice after husband David Withers died of an aneurysm at Crewe's Leighton Hospital – the day after he was sent home with 'a muscle strain'.

Now Mrs Withers, of Sandbach, has hit out at the hospital after a legal investigation revealed a scan may have saved him.

The father-of three first became unwell on December 10, 2011 after suffering serious abdominal pain.

Mr Withers, who had four grandchildren, underwent blood and urine tests at Leighton that came back normal. He was diagnosed with a muscle strain and at 11pm – two-and-half-hours after first seeing a doctor he was sent home.

But the 72-year-old deteriorated overnight and collapsed at 7am the next day.

He was taken back to the Crewe hospital where he died at 9am of a ruptured aortic aneurysm.

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

'We waited 13 years for NHS to admit blame for our son's brain damage
'We waited 13 years for NHS to admit blame for our son's brain damage
Published 3rd Sep 2015

Ben Harman's parents awarded £20million negligence payout - one of biggest in medical history - after he was sent home with low blood sugar levels when he was born.

A hospital responsible for causing severe brain damage to a newborn baby has finally apologised after 13-years.

Ben Harman’s parents were led to believe their son’s condition was their own fault and only discovered the truth when an independent doctor revealed the hospital’s error was in his medical notes all along.

The trust has admitted it “failed to follow its own protocol” in the hours following his birth in April 2002. They also admit that had Ben not been discharged prematurely he “would not have sustained his subsequent brain injury”.

He is now in line for damages, expected to be over £20million, to fund the lifetime of care he will need.

Source: mirror

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Hospital pays out £7m over medical negligence claim
Hospital pays out £7m over medical negligence claim
Published 3rd Sep 2015

Kettering General Hospital has agreed to pay out more than £7m to the family of a baby who was the victim of medical negligence.

The case related to a negligent delay in childbirth after the baby showed signs of foetal distress. This led to a lack of oxygen, causing brain damage and the child was diagnosed with cerebral palsy.

The hospital has accepted that 90 per cent of the child’s brain damage was caused by their negligence.

The claim, which has been ongoing for several years, has now been resolved with Kettering General Hospital agreeing to pay £7.1m.

Source: northamptonchron

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Nuneaton hospital surgery error scars patient
Nuneaton hospital surgery error scars patient
Published 3rd Sep 2015

Stephanie Austin from Nuneaton suffered third degree burns on her breast in an operation at the Trust.

Not only did the doctor, who has not been identified, set a piece of electrical medical equipment incorrectly, he then allowed it to come into contact with her skin, causing the permanent scarring.

The 31-year-old said: "When I came out of surgery, I was told by the surgeon that there had been a slight accident and I had a little burn. I didn't really take this in at first as I was still coming round from the anaesthetic.

"It wasn't until I left the hospital and I removed the dressings that I realised the full extent of the burn. I was absolutely mortified when I took off the gauze and just burst into tears. I think the surgeon must have rested the device on me instead of putting it back in its holder when he was not using it.

Bosses at the hospital admitted breach of duty on February 13 of this year and then settled her claim.

Source: nuneaton-news

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.



Driver wins compensation after horror A38 crash
Driver wins compensation after horror A38 crash
Published 2nd Sep 2015
A driver who was injured in a head-on collision has been awarded compensation.
 
Nick Brancher, aged 37, was driving along the A38 in Glynn Valley near Bodmin when he was struck by a car which had swerved from the other side of the road.
 
Mr Brancher, from Saltash, had dropped his nine-year-old daughter off just minutes before the crash, which left him with extensive bruising to his ribs, neck pain and a fracture to his right elbow.
 
He said: “The other driver had lost control and hit two other cars before we collided head-on.
 
“It took around two weeks for the soft tissue injuries to fully manifest themselves and fortunately my employer allowed me to work flexible hours and on light duties until I’d recovered enough to resume my normal role.”
 
Mr Brancher was able to return to work two days after the accident but could not enjoy his hobbies of Ju Jitsu, climbing, kayaking and cycling for months.
 
“Even though my accident wasn’t work-related I was still able to claim for compensation, which is very reassuring and proved a big help to me and my family.”
 
Source: plymouthherald
 
C&S Solicitors are a specialist firm dealing with personal injury and clinical negligence claims.

Boy left disabled during birth could receive record £15m compensation
Boy left disabled during birth could receive record £15m compensation
Published 2nd Sep 2015

A 12-year-old boy, left catastrophically disabled by being starved of oxygen during his birth, is expected to receive almost £15 million in damages from the NHS.

A High Court judge said it was agreed by all sides that James Robshaw’s birth at Lincoln County Hospital in December 2002 had been "negligently mishandled" leaving him facing a lifetime of dependence and requiring a multi-million payout to support him.

The final figure has yet to be settled but is expected to be around £14.6 million, making it one of the highest awards ever made by a British court in a medical negligence case.

The court heard that avoidable complications in James’s birth had left him with cerebral palsy, affecting his movement in all four limbs. He communicates using a machine which he controls with his eyes.

“James is a bright 12 year old lad with a wicked sense of humour and perhaps the most distressing aspect of this case is the loss of the life James could have had if he had not been injured.”

Source: telegraph

C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Family of terminally ill mum who died after hospital trolley fall receive compensation
Family of terminally ill mum who died after hospital trolley fall receive compensation
Published 1st Sep 2015
Christine Carpenter was left for more than seven hours in Hull Royal Infirmary’s emergency department and fractured her left hip in the fall.
 
The family of a mum-of-seven with terminal cancer who died falling off a hospital trolley in an overstretched A&E ward have received a five figure sum in compensation.
 
Christine Carpenter was left for more than seven hours in Hull Royal Infirmary’s emergency department and fractured her left hip in the fall.
 
The 61-year-old became severely dehydrated after she was abandoned by staff on a ward which was understaffed by 25 per cent below recommended levels.
 
Husband Paul warned medics when they first arrived his wife was disorientated and should not be left, but his advice was ignored.
 
After surgery for the broken hip in October, an infection took hold, which led to septicaemia and caused her death in December.
 
Source: mirror.co.uk
 
C&S Solicitors offer our condolences to the family involved in this tragic event. C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Family's fight for justice after disabled man was burnt alive in his wheelchair
Family's fight for justice after disabled man was burnt alive in his wheelchair
Published 1st Sep 2015
The Health and Safety Executive ruled that a wheelchair malfunction was to blame after the manufacturer failed to recall a faulty batch.
 
A family are still fighting for justice seven years after a disabled man burnt to death when his wheelchair malfunctioned.
 
Denis McKenna, 55, who had spinal muscular atrophy, a degenerative disease, called his brother for help as his chair went up in flames.
 
But his desperate pleas only reached the answer phone and by the time his brother Charlie, 59, heard the harrowing message, Denis had already died.
 
Now, seven years after the horrific accident, Charlie is still demanding answers after it emerged the electric wheelchair had been fitted with a sub-standard component.
 
Retired teacher Charlie says the horror of the night his brother died on May 8, 2008, will never leave him.
 
Source: mirror.co.uk
 
C&S Solicitors are a specialist firm of Clinical Negligence Solicitors; we extend our sympathy to this family following these tragic events.  If you or anyone you know has suffered an injury or negligence we are available to discuss any possible help our firm could help you and your family with.

Biker awarded £10,000 in compensation after skidding on muddy road
Biker awarded £10,000 in compensation after skidding on muddy road
Published 1st Sep 2015
A farmer’s insurance company has paid out £10,000 in compensation to a teenage biker who broke her collarbone after losing control on a muddy, rural road.
 
Carrie Dickinson was 16 when she was riding her motorbike along a country lane close to her home in Doncaster. She lost control driving over mud on the road near a farmer’s field.
 
She was discovered by her father who was travelling in a car minutes behind her. He took photographs of the scene to help build a case against the farmer.
 
“I had been riding for about a month and I was always a safe driver. I’m disgusted the farmer didn’t clear up the road, or put some signs up. If the mud wasn’t there, it wouldn’t have happened.
 
“The accident happened mid-corner and I ended up about 20 metres down the road. It’s a bit of a blur. It was pure shock.”
 
The farmer’s insurance company agreed and admitted liability, awarding a £10,000 payout in compensation.
 
Source: motoringresearch.com
 
C&S Solicitors are a specialist firm that deal with personal injury and clinical negligence claims.

Man awarded £8,500 over dodgy dentistry
Man awarded £8,500 over dodgy dentistry
Published 1st Sep 2015

A Shefford pensioner has been awarded £8,500 after having dental surgery which left him in pain for three years.

Philip Long, 65, had his two front teeth replaced with implants, only to need one of them surgically removing again and requiring a bone graft and crowns.

“I saw Dr Spyridon Galatas who confirmed my previous dentist’s diagnosis but never offered me an alternative other than implants, nor did he explain the risks associated with implant treatment.’’

“I paid a deposit and the treatment was scheduled to take place in early November 2010 at a cost of £4,500.”

On the day of the appointment, Mr Long travelled to see Dr Galatas who, 10 minutes before his treatment was due, gave him paperwork to sign which stated that the success of the treatment was not guaranteed.

Mr Long commented: “I was shocked, this was the first time that anyone had told me this! I was worried but I felt obliged to undergo the treatment as everything had been prepared and I had already paid a deposit. 

The procedure was carried out and Mr Long’s two front teeth were removed and implants fitted. However, during the operation there was another lady present who looked concerned.

Mr Long explained: “Throughout the treatment, her face said it all, she was obviously concerned with Dr Galatas’ technique. Following the procedure, she told me that this was a new type of implant and this was the first time it had been fitted in the UK.

Mr Long’s troubles were far from over though as he suffered a number of complications over recent years. After a long battle in February this year Mr Long was awarded £8,500 in an out-of-court settlement. Dr Galatas did not admit liability for his actions.

Source: biggleswadetoday.co.uk

C&S Solicitors are a specialist firm that deal with clinical negligence claims.


Groom awarded £20,000 compensation after kicked at work by horse
Groom awarded £20,000 compensation after kicked at work by horse
Published 1st Sep 2015

A teenage part-time groom has been awarded more than £20,000 in compensation after being kicked while at work.

Jess Rawnsley was 16 when she was kicked by a horse on 1 April 2014.

She was working as a part-time groom at a riding school in West Yorkshire when she was asked to turn out one of the horses.

The horse spun round kicked her in the face, breaking her jaw in two places and causing her briefly to lose consciousness.

Miss Rawnsley said she was not aware that one of the horses had a history of temperament issues.

Miss Rawnsley is expected to make a “good functional recovery” from her injuries, although she was likely to suffer from altered sensation and mild paraesthesia of her lip indefinitely, in addition to suffering from mild permanent swelling of the left side of her jaw.

She was awarded £20,750 compensation on 15 July this year.

Source: horseandhound.co.uk

C&S Solicitors specialise in personal injury and clinical negligence claims.

Former warehouse worker injured in horror fall awarded more than £500,000 in compensation
Former warehouse worker injured in horror fall awarded more than £500,000 in compensation
Published 27th Aug 2015
A former warehouse worker from Plymouth has been awarded more than £500,000 in compensation following a horror fall which led to the amputation of his leg.

Mark Jeffery, 47, fell from a height while cleaning out the guttering at his employer's premises in Plymouth in 2005, shattering his leg, ankle and foot in the process.
After 13 operations and eight years later, Mark had his lower left leg amputated.
He has now been awarded £530,000 in compensation for the life-changing incident, and is set to become a counsellor to help others who go through similar experiences.
 
The loss of his limb and ability to play sports caused him physical and psychological trauma, for which he took pain management sessions, counselling and physiotherapy.

The dispute, which involved disagreements about the equipment used to carry out the work, was settled between the parties and Mark's employers agreed to compensate him.

A settlement was secured from the insurance company of the firm to compensate for the pain and suffering he went through, as well as loss of earnings and help towards his retraining in a non-manual career.
Source: plymouthherald.co.uk
C&S Solicitors are a specialist firm that deal with clinical negligence and personal injury claims. If you or your family has encountered an accident similar to this we are available to discuss any help that our firm could offer you.

Rider receives £30,000 compensation after being hit by lorry
Rider receives £30,000 compensation after being hit by lorry
Published 25th Aug 2015

A rider was awarded £30,000 compensation last month (15 July) after her horse was hit by a lorry.

Claire Macmanomy was hacking her friend’s horse, Red, in Gospel End, W Mids, on 7 February 2014 when the accident happened.

The mare’s owner, Kay Hill-Sayce, was on foot alongside them when they saw a skip lorry approaching. Due to the speed at which the truck was travelling and how close it was, Mrs Hill-Sayce took hold of the reins and signalled for the driver to slow down.

The horse reared up, throwing Ms Macmanomy into the side of the lorry before they both fell on to the road.

Ms Macmanomy was taken to Russells Hall Hospital in nearby Dudley. She was X-rayed and was found to have broken three lumbar vertebrae.

She remained in hospital for a month and had to wear a back brace until mid-May 2014.

The lorry driver stopped further along the road but left before the police arrived. He was later found and fined £255, and had five points added to his licence after admitting to failing to report an accident. The rider later received £30,000 in July 2015.    

Source:  horseandhound.co.uk

C&S Solicitors are a specialist firm that deal with clinical negligence and personal injury claims. If you or your family has encountered an event similar to this we are available to discuss any help that our firm could offer you.


Chest pain clinic failed to diagnose a man's heart disease
Chest pain clinic failed to diagnose a man's heart disease
Published 25th Aug 2015
The family of a man who died from a heart attack after a specialist chest pain clinic failed to diagnose his heart disease has received compensation.
 
The man, known only as D was a highly respected member of his community who began to suffer new chest pains in summer 2010.
 
He attended his GP who referred him to the Rapid Access Chest Pain Clinic at his local hospital.  Following assessment, D was informed that his chest pains were nothing more than musculoskeletal aches and pains caused by arthritis.
 
However, the doctor who assessed D at the clinic failed to recognise key indicators of heart disease and, as a consequence, the diagnosis was missed.   D left the clinic reassured that he did not have problems with his heart.
 
In the absence of treatment, D’s chest pain persisted until he suffered a massive heart attack and sadly died.
 
If the doctors had informed D and his GP, D would have received the necessary urgent treatment that he required which would have prevented his heart attack and death.
 
In response to those allegations, the hospital admitted liability in full and the case was settled.
 
Source: lexology.com
 
C&S Solicitors offer our condolences to the family involved in this event. C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

Hospital admits liability over death of new born baby
Hospital admits liability over death of new born baby
Published 24th Aug 2015

The Royal Oldham Hospital has admitted causing the death of newborn baby Thomas Beaty, following a failed forceps delivery.

Thomas Beaty survived for just 26 hours after being born by emergency Caesarean section after five failed attempts to deliver him using forceps.

An inquest  held earlier this year concluded that he had died from serious head injuries. This inquest also found that the hospital had acted outside national guidelines which state that, if unsuccessful, the surgical instrument should be abandoned after the third attempt.

“We are saddened and hurt at this inevitable admission of failings but we can now start to grieve for Thomas properly.’’ - Martin and Hannah Beaty

C&S Solicitors are a specialist firm of Clinical Negligence Solicitors; we extend our sympathy to this family following these tragic events.  If you or anyone you know has suffered a similar tragedy we are available to discuss any possible help our firm could help you and your family with.

(Source - manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
Widower wins thousands in compensation after wife's cancer was misdiagnosed as swimmer's ear
Widower wins thousands in compensation after wife's cancer was misdiagnosed as swimmer's ear
Published 24th Aug 2015

A widower has won thousands of compensation after his wife's cancer was initially misdiagnosed as a swimmer's ear infection.

Kathleen Howe, 67, died after an NHS consultant spent two years saying the tumour in her head was “swimmer’s ear” - and she was given drops to treat it.

An investigation found Mrs. Howe would have had a "90 to 100%" chance of survival if she was diagnosed in time but died because of the medical negligence.

Health chiefs admitted negligence and gave her husband Alan an out-of-court settlement with an apology for her death.

C&S Solicitors offer our condolences to the Howe family. C&S Solicitors specialise in clinical negligence claims (also known as medical negligence claims) and our specialist lawyers are available to discuss any events similar to this that you or your family may encounter.

(Source - mirror.co.uk)

 

 

 

Tributes paid to young woman killed in horror car smash in Woodthorpe
Tributes paid to young woman killed in horror car smash in Woodthorpe
Published 24th Aug 2015

Passers-by paid their respects at the scene of a fatal crash that led to the death of a young woman.

The woman was taken to the Queen's Medical Centre but died a short time later and a male pedestrian, who was seriously injured, remains in hospital after a car ploughed into the two pedestrians.

A man is currently being held on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol following the crash on Friday, which happened around 12.30pm.

Witnesses said they saw a white Mercedes mount the pavement, hit the two pedestrians and crash into a lamppost.

C&S Solicitors are a specialist firm that deal with clinical negligence and personal injury claims. If you or your family has encountered an event similar to this we are available to discuss any help that our firm could offer you.


(Source - nottinghampost.com)



Kidderminster Harriers boasts the most expensive pies
Kidderminster Harriers boasts the most expensive pies
Published 16th Oct 2014

In an annual 'Price of Football' report published on Wednesday 15th October 2014, it was revealed that Kidderminster Harriers have the most expensive half-time pies out of any club in the Football League.

Fans of the club have to pay £4.50 to enjoy the tasty snack, which is a stark contrast to the £1 pies that you can purchase at some other clubs in the same division. 

The annual report documents the price of many football essentials, from tickets to shirts, programmes, and even cups of tea. 

One thing is for sure, Kidderminster Harriers' pies are not to be missed!

Source: Daily Mirror, Daily Mail 

7 year old girl dies after being misdiagnosed three times
7 year old girl dies after being misdiagnosed three times
Published 15th Sep 2014

A 7 year old girl has died from a bacterial infection after being sent home from A&E three times, in three days.

Evelyn Smith was rushed to A&E, in September 2013, with a high temperature and vomiting, but was sent home with advice on how to reduce her temperature. The next day, Evelyn’s parents took her to her GP, who prescribed antibiotics for inflamed tonsils. After the third attempt at seeing a Doctor, Evelyn was sent home again but died at home, in Warwick, 2 hours later.

An inquest into her death found that she had died from a rare bacterial infection – Bacterial Trachetis – as a result of croup. Although a Doctor had diagnosed Evelyn with croup, they missed the deadly bacterial signs that Evelyn was displaying and if these had been noticed and treated properly, Evelyn’s death could have been prevented.

The Director of NHS England has accepted that opportunities were missed in identifying the seriousness of Evelyn’s condition.

Information sourced from The Mirror

C&S Solicitors, based in Worcestershire, deal with all types of Personal Injury claims and Clinical Negligence (Medical Negligence) claims, from road traffic accidents and accidents at work through to medical issues such as misdiagnosis and poor standards of care. For an initial assessment, without obligation, please contact us on 01562 752199.

Kidderminster Harriers Non League Day
Kidderminster Harriers Non League Day
Published 5th Sep 2014

C&S Solicitors are proud to sponsor the